Saint Mary’s student panel discusses mental health

first_imgA panel of Saint Mary’s students shared their experiences with mental illness Monday as part of the College’s Support a Belle, Love a Belle (SABLAB) week.Sophomore Alicia Twisselmann started off the panel talking about about her struggle with anxiety and depression. She said the combination of her anxiety and depression with attention deficit disorder (ADD) makes it difficult for her to stay motivated.Chris Collins | The Observer “I have such high goals and aspirations, and I’m a perfectionist,” she said.“Yet at the same time, I still can’t quite bring myself to do what I know I need to.” She said she has been affected by her mental illnesses for as long as she can remember, and was first put on medication in second grade. “I’m thankful that at this point it’s just sort of at the background, but it still definitely continues to have an impact,” she said.Twisselmann said small acts of kindness matter the most to her and will help encourage her to open up to others about how she’s feeling.  Chris Collins | The Observer Sophomore Meredith Mackowicz spoke about her experience living with generalized anxiety disorder and clinical depression. She said while she was able to self-diagnose her mental disorders, she finally opened up to a doctor two summers ago.“I feel like there’s such a stigma, especially on college campuses, about mental illnesses. And while it is a part of me, it’s not the biggest part of me and it’s not the most important part of me,” Mackowicz said. “There’s so many other things that I take pride in like music and theatre and art and there’s so many aspects to a person.”Mackowicz said once she was able to open up about her mental illness, she found other students on campus who had the same issues and background as her.“I think the best way to beat the stigma is to just not worry about it and to realize some people are going to have issues that you won’t understand and that they can’t explain to you,” she said. “I think we just have to be patient, we have to be open to people and realize that if you just do one small thing you can make a complete difference in someone else’s life.”Sophomore Ashley Coates opened up about her struggle with anxiety and clinical depression. She said she knew there was a problem when she would wake up anxious and unable to get out of bed.“Although it is 100 percent mental — as in it’s [your head] that’s making you feel that way — it does affect your body physically,” Coates said. “For example, if I become anxious, I can’t eat.” Coates said while there are difficult patches, she was able to get a better grasp on her mental illnesses with the help of the Saint Mary’s psychiatrist.“There’s an end,” she said. “There’s a point where it stops where you’re okay again, and you’ll be okay. I just want everyone to know that there is that point — whether you’re dealing with anxiety or dealing with depression or whatever you’re dealing with — there is a point where you will be okay again and that’s where I’m trying to be.”Junior Taylor Thomas shared her struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Thomas said she is a perfectionist and had difficulty opening up about the side effects of her mental illnesses with others.“I did really well in school freshman year and then things started going downhill, especially my sophomore year,” she said. “I didn’t care about tests, I didn’t care about anything, I didn’t even want to get out of bed most days. It was really rough.”Thomas said Saint Mary’s staff and faculty have been supportive and helpful on her journey towards learning to cope with PTSD and depression.“It has been rough, it has not been easy at all,” Thomas said. “So if you’re going into therapy thinking one session is it — no. It’s going to be a long haul, and I’m still dealing with it today.”Junior Alyssa Richards spoke about her struggles with depression. She said her depression comes and goes, but is manageable now.“It got to the point where I felt like a zombie just watching myself go through my day-to-day tasks,” she said. “I lost interest in things that were really important to me.”Richards said she has been able to find peace and solace in nature. “I am a very strong-minded person, even though I do have depression, so I was determined to find out the things that make me happy,” she said. “I’m doing a lot better, and I’ve figured out how to deal with it on my own.”Mackowicz said seeking help is important even if someone is unsure if they have a diagnosable disorder.“Disorders manifest themselves in many different ways and in many different forms, and I think it’s important to know that because if you think you might have one aspect of a disorder that’s okay,” Mackowicz said. “It’s still good to get help, it’s still good to talk to somebody about that one aspect.”Tags: Mental health, SABLAB, support a belle love a bellelast_img read more

You Can’t Take It With You Will Extend on Broadway

first_imgWe can’t get enough of this tricky family dinner! The acclaimed Broadway revival of Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman’s You Can’t Take It With You will extend through February 22, 2015 at the Longacre Theatre. The limited run had previously been set to shutter on January 4 after officially opening on September 28. You Can’t Take It With You View Comments Directed by Scott Ellis, the Pulitzer Prize-winning You Can’t Take It With You centers on the freethinking Sycamore family and the mayhem that ensues when their daughter’s fiancé brings his conservative, straight-laced parents to dinner on the wrong night. The show debuted at the Booth Theatre in 1936 and was last revived on Broadway in 1983. Related Shows The starry cast includes James Earl Jones, Rose Byrne, Elizabeth Ashley, Annaleigh Ashford, Kristine Nielsen, Byron Jennings, Johanna Day, Mark Linn-Baker, Reg Rogers, Crystal A. Dickinson, Marc Damon Johnson, Patrick Kerr, Will Brill, Fran Kranz, Nick Corley, Austin Durant and Joe Tapper. Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 22, 2015last_img read more

Vermont ranked 2nd in nation in impact of poverty relief program 3SquaresVT

first_imgPoverty increased in Vermont and across the nation in 2010: according to the US Census Bureau, over 76,000 Vermonters (including 1 in 6 children) are living below the poverty level ($22,314 for a family of four), with nearly 165,000 Vermonters (1 in 3 children) considered low-income (below 185% of poverty).  Almost 93,000 Vermonters currently receive 3SquaresVT benefits (known nationally as SNAP), which, when added to income, lifted 26% of 3SquaresVT households out of poverty, ranking Vermont second in the nation for its program impact. 3SquaresVT continues to see rising participation as well as all-time high benefits, bringing over $11 million into the Vermont economy each month. ‘Whether it is the Great Recession or Tropical Storm Irene, 3SquaresVT is the most responsive safety net program in tough times,’ says Angela Smith-Dieng, 3SquaresVT Advocacy Manager at Hunger Free Vermont. ‘The extra money for food makes a critical difference for families ‘ it means more fruits and vegetables, lean meats and dairy on Vermonters’ tables, helping them stay healthy and better able to work and learn.’The Vermont Department for Children and Families (DCF) and the anti-hunger community have worked hard in recent years to ensure that more Vermonters needing access to healthy food are able to receive 3SquaresVT and that benefits are an adequate supplement for families on a tight budget.  The USDA has consistently recognized Vermont for its hard work by awarding the State with performance bonuses for its success in reaching many of those eligible for benefits.  ‘Since I started with the program in 2001 we have worked diligently to partner with anti-hunger organizations to do outreach on this program to remove participation barriers and stigma,’ says Reneé Richardson, Director of Food and Nutrition Programs at DCF. ‘Thanks to this collaboration we have almost tripled our enrollment in the last ten years.’With so many Vermonters relying on 3SquaresVT and many more newly eligible, Congress must work to protect this critical nutrition program that combats hunger and poverty so well.  As the Select Committee on Deficit Reduction meets this fall to consider ways to reduce spending, cuts to 3SquaresVT and other anti-hunger programs should not be part of the deal. About Hunger Free Vermont: Hunger Free Vermont (formerly the Vermont Campaign to End Childhood Hunger) is a statewide nonprofit organization that works with state agencies and community groups to end the injustice of hunger and malnutrition for all Vermonters. Since 1993 Hunger Free Vermont’s outreach programs have substantially enhanced Vermont’s nutrition safety net and increased access to nutritious foods. www.hungerfreevt.org(link is external)September 28, 2011 (Vermont) ‘last_img read more

Equinor taps new CEO, sets sights on quicker green energy transition

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Equinor ASA appointed its head of technology and projects, Anders Opedal, to lead the company as Eldar Saetre retires after running the Norwegian state-controlled oil major for six years.Opedal, 52, will take over in November with a mandate to accelerate Equinor’s transformation into a broader energy company as pressure grows on the industry to act on climate change. Saetre already oversaw a step-change in focus on emissions and cleaner energy, and even changed its name from Statoil to articulate the promise of a more sustainable course.“Equinor is entering a phase of significant change as the world needs to take more forceful action to combat climate change,” Chairman Jon Erik Reinhardsen said Monday in a statement. “Anders is the right person to further develop Equinor as a force in the green shift.”Opedal’s promotion comes at a challenging time for the industry, which is struggling with the immediate impact of the Covid-19 crisis and the longer-term uncertainty weighing on energy. He will also need to address criticism at home over investments in U.S. shale oil by Saetre’s predecessor Helge Lund, which have led to impairments of more than $10 billion.Equinor earlier this year boosted its climate ambitions, saying it will cut the net carbon intensity of the energy it produces by at least half by 2050, through a sharp increase in renewables output and changes in its oil and gas portfolio. Since then, rival BP Plc has upped the ante, indicating pressure on oil companies from investors and society isn’t about to abate.“We have a great starting point for what will be a massive transition,” Opedal said. “Together, we will accelerate the development of Equinor as a broad energy company and our growth within renewables.”[Mikael Holter and Lars Erik Taraldsen]More: Equinor promotes technology chief to CEO to lead clean-energy push Equinor taps new CEO, sets sights on quicker green energy transitionlast_img read more

Interview with Mr. Denzil L. Douglas, Prime Minister of St. Kitts and Nevis

first_img The Prime Minister of Saint Kitts and Nevis, Mr. Denzil L. Douglas, gave one of the most passionate presentations during the 2012 Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC), hosted and sponsored by that Caribbean nation with co-sponsorship of the United States Southern Command, in December 2011. Diálogo had the opportunity to talk to Prime Minister Douglas right after his opening remarks about some of the topics referenced in his speech, such as regional security, information sharing, and disaster relief. Diálogo: What is the importance of a conference like CANSEC? Prime Minister Denzil L. Douglas: Because everybody here has a shared interest in protecting the region, and this conference calls for in-depth analysis and planning of our way forward. Transnational organized crime is not what it used to be. It is ever more sophisticated, ever more complex in its operations, ever more covert, and ever more resolute, and that is why CANSEC 2012 is so important to us. Diálogo: What are the main security concerns for Saint Kitts & Nevis today? Prime Minister Douglas: Whether one is the world’s leading superpower like the United States of America, or the Western Hemisphere’s smallest nation like St. Kitts and Nevis, national security is the pivot on which all else turns. We battle criminality because, regardless of size or stature, the fight against crime is key to social stability. [We] battle criminality because without such a fight, the gears of our economic engines become completely jammed. And we battle criminality because criminality unchecked is a threat to the political system on which any credible, legitimate government stands. Diálogo: Why is it so important that countries in the region share information with the U.S.? Prime Minister Douglas: Whether we, in this hemisphere, institute systems to expedite secure sharing of actionable intelligence or not, will, without a doubt, determine whether we tip the balance in this hemisphere in favor of transnational organized crime, or in favor of the democratic law-and-order values that we are responsible for protecting. The time for high and sustained levels of intraregional collaboration is now. The U.S. Department of Justice states that the primary threat of drug smuggling to the United States on aircraft will continue to be composed of criminals using commercial airlines from South America and the Caribbean to smuggle heroin and cocaine. Caribbean governments, at the same time, know that the seminal threat to Caribbean societies remains in the unrestricted flow of conventional arms, including small arms, light weapons, and ammunition, from the United States into several of our countries. The juxtaposition of these two facts makes it abundantly clear just how pressing the need is for dramatically improved and fully reciprocal information-sharing amongst all states represented here at CANSEC. Diálogo: What is the framework for crime and security instituted in the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) recently? Prime Minister Douglas: A critical component of the management framework for crime and security instituted by the CARICOM heads of the joint crime-fighting mechanism is information-sharing, and this is implemented through our principal agencies that are tasked to work collaboratively at the regional and national levels in addressing our security interests. Indeed, we have seen the positive outcome of this collaborative approach in various areas of operations, whether it is in border security, where movement of individuals across our borders must be closely monitored, or whether it is spatial and aerial surveillance, as our officers work strategically to stem illicit trafficking in firearms, drugs, or humans in our waters, or to give humanitarian assistance in times of national disaster. The platform for information-sharing [is] provided for in the regional security architecture as an integral part of our plan of action and will continue to be pivotal to the success of the work of our military and our law-enforcement and intelligence officers as they work collaboratively within the region and with their colleagues of the United States Southern Command on this all-important area of national security. Diálogo: Is it necessary to develop stronger links between the Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF-S), in Key West, and the Caribbean? Prime Minister Douglas: Yes, absolutely. Developing stronger links between JIATF-S and Caribbean law enforcement and core staff authorities would benefit all involved, and so, seeing this, we must now explore the logistical and other details that would go into having a Caribbean on-site liaison at the Interagency Task Force to help anticipate, to help expedite facilities and initiatives on a range of matters, from transnational criminality to humanitarian disaster assistance. Diálogo: What can be done to improve a regional response for disaster relief? Prime Minister Douglas: There is an urgent need for a truly hemispheric disaster-response mechanism, both in terms of access to assets as well as in terms of an early-warning and response system, as Hurricane Ivan’s devastation to Grenada back in 2004 illustrated in such a stark, graphic, and tragic way. We now find ourselves in an era of increasingly deadly climate-change-triggered storms, and small vessels are simply incapable of handling the rapid-response humanitarian assistance that these crises call for. This region’s low-cost advantages compared to other regions and nations would permit off-the-shelf large vessels like trampers, outfitted with the best equipment and painted gray, to take the lead in both pressing humanitarian-assistance operations as well as drug-interdiction operations on our open seas, and all at a fraction of the cost elsewhere. Diálogo: What is the importance of the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative? Prime Minister Douglas: The Caribbean Basin Security Initiative provides that platform from which the United States and the Caribbean can collaboratively advance the national-security interests of our beloved region, and in that initiative, we committed ourselves to pursuing a coordinated approach in engaging development partners in implementing all important social-development and crime-prevention initiatives. By Dialogo February 22, 2012last_img read more

NCUA Board approves $1.3M budget reduction

first_imgby: Heather AndersonThe NCUA board approved a net decrease of $1.3 million to the 2015 operating budget during its monthly board meeting. The net reduction was a result of a reduction of the operating fund budget by $2.9 million for a revised total budget of $276,532,779; however,the capital budget was increased by $1.6 million for a revised budget of $10,482,500.According to the Board Action Memorandum, the majority of capital budget increases were the result of increased cybersecurity capabitilities. An investment of $1.3 million will “leverage commercially available data center facility services” to put the NCUA on par with government security standards. An additional $150,000 will pay for safety upgrades to the NCUA’s headquarters office and  another $160,000 will upgrade equipment used by remote employees. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Losinj Hotels & Villas introduces direct flights to Losinj

first_imgThis summer, the hotel brand Lošinj Hotels & Villas offers its guests a faster and easier arrival to the island of vitality with a special offer of flights.Namely, from June 25 to September 16, LH&V, in cooperation with the Czech airline Silver Air, is organizing return flights from Zagreb, Split, Pula and Lugano to Lošinj at a price of as little as 235 euros. Thus, the arrival on the island of Lošinj becomes more accessible, and Lošinj will additionally confirm its deserved place on the map of unavoidable tourist destinations in the Mediterranean.Thanks to the new flight schedule, domestic and foreign guests can travel to Lošinj this summer with return flights from Zagreb three times a week, from Pula and Split twice a week, and from Lugano, Switzerland once a week. For example, the journey from Zagreb to Lošinj on the new Silver Air flight takes only 45 minutes. A total of 14 passengers can leave for their extended weekend on the island of vitality on Thursday or Friday at 17 pm and return to Zagreb on Monday at 9 am after a sunny weekend. In addition, LH&V provides guests who arrive on the island by plane with transportation to the hotel, as well as return to Mali Lošinj Airport.”By introducing new flights, we continue the mission of planned development of Lošinj as an elite tourist destination, and by realizing a better connection between the island of Lošinj and the mainland, we make all its beauties more accessible to our guests. The islands, with their unique beauty and perfectly preserved nature, are at the same time a travel challenge, but with the introduction of new flights, we have reduced the trip to Lošinj to the shortest possible time.. ”, Said the member of the Management Board of the Jadranka Group Goran Filipović and adds that better traffic connection and easier communication of the island with the mainland is one of the strategic goals of the Lošinj Jadranka Group, which has been working for 70 years to position Lošinj and the entire Cres archipelago on the tourist map of this part of the Mediterranean.”The planned reconstruction and expansion of the Mali Lošinj Airport will also contribute to the achievement of these goals, which in the future will enable easier access to the destination for all visitors, because then aircraft with a capacity of up to 180 passengers will be able to land on Lošinj.”Concludes Filipović.Find out all the details about the flight schedule, accommodation offer and reservations on the website  losinj-hotels.com i silverairtravels.com.last_img read more

66,000 ha waits for development

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Governor Wolf Signs Criminal History Sealing Expansion Bill into Law

first_img February 16, 2016 Governor Wolf Signs Criminal History Sealing Expansion Bill into Law Bill Signing,  Criminal Justice Reform,  Government That Works,  Press Release,  Public Safety,  Results Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today signed Senate Bill 166, sponsored by Senator Stewart Greenleaf, into law, which expands criminal record sealing in Pennsylvania in order to reduce recidivism, relieve the pardon system, and provide ex-offenders greater opportunity to join the workforce. Governor Wolf was joined today at a bill signing ceremony by Sen. Greenleaf, Rep. Jordan Harris, chairs of Judiciary committees and various criminal justice organizations.“The United States is the world leader in incarceration and a criminal record often carries a lifetime of consequences that often lead to poverty or re-incarceration,” Governor Wolf said. “This law is a commonsense, positive and unprecedented step to help Pennsylvanians with minor or dated criminal records have a fighting chance at opportunities for gainful employment.“Too many first-time and low-level offenders are serving their time and unable to improve their lives after leaving the system because they have a criminal record. And, they are too likely then to return to the system. We must do everything we can to break this cycle; it is robbing too many of their lives and it is costing taxpayers far too much.”SB 166 amends Title 18 (Crimes and Offenses) to allow individuals who have served their punishment and remained free of arrest or prosecution for seven to ten years, for nonviolent misdemeanors, to petition the court for their record to be sealed from public view.Between 70 and 100 million Americans, or as many as one in three American adults, have some type of criminal record. A recent report estimated that between 33 and 36.5 million children in the United States—nearly half of all U.S. children—have at least one parent with a criminal record.A criminal record often carries a lifetime of consequences, and even a minor criminal record can be a serious impediment to employment, housing, education and training, public assistance, financial empowerment, and more.More than half of U.S. states (27) allow some misdemeanor and even felony convictions to be expunged or sealed. This Act allows certain criminal records to be sealed, meaning that law enforcement and state licensing agencies will continue to have access to those records – but those records will no longer be an impediment for employment or housing.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Southern states to sap Qld’s GST revenue gains: Moody’s

first_imgHome values dropped across the country in 2018. Picture: Penny Stephens.Earlier this month, CoreLogic data revealed national home values dropped 4.8 per cent in 2018, marking the weakest housing market since 2008.Brisbane bucked the trend, with values rising 1.2 per cent for the year. Moody’s says state governments are feeling pressure from the housing correction. Image: AAP/Troy Snook.The report singles out Queensland as being vulnerable to rising health and education costs because of its recent “rapid population growth”.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours agoIt forecasts an increase in capital spending in the state as a result, which would erode cash reserves and prompt the state government to issue additional debt.“Debt levels remain elevated, and we expect debt will continue to rise more rapidly than revenue as most states embark on record capital spending programs,” Moody’s senior credit officer John Manning said. Moody’s says GST reform has added revenue to Queensland, but it will not enough to offset the fall in stamp duty. Image: AAP/Darren England.In its most recent budget update, the Queensland government also marked down stamp duties by $240 million.But NSW and Victoria are expected to be hit the hardest.“Despite already projecting lower property-related revenue in their fiscal year 2019 budgets, the larger states of NSW and Victoria now forecast further declines in transfer duty and land tax revenue as a result of weakening residential property market prices and falling sales volumes,” Mr Manning said in the report.“Concurrently, Queensland projects a marginal decrease in average revenue growth over the forecast period, reflecting lower income from GST and dividends, more than offsetting increased royalties in FY2019, largely on higher coal prices.”center_img Moody’s says state governments are feeling pressure from the housing correction.THE property downturn led by the country’s two biggest housing markets is partly eroding Queensland’s revenue gains from reforms to GST funding, a new report warns.While the sunshine state is weathering the correction better than most states, Moody’s Investor Services says government debt levels remain high and could outpace revenue growth on capital spending programs.And while the recent GST reform has given Queensland an extra $518 million over the next eight years, the rating agency says it may not enough to offset the fall in stamp duty.last_img read more