Guyanese youths share opinions on climate change

first_imgThe Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) in Guyana on Wednesday hosted a youth perspective conference on climate change and clean energy, with the aim of getting today’s generation involved in ideas that can mitigate this ongoing issue.The National Library was filled to capacity with representatives of CYEN in Guyana, the United Nations, local institutions and most importantly, students of several secondary schools.United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Resident Coordinator Mikiko Tanaka underscored the importance of Guyana’s natural resources to finding solutions to end climate change. One of the alarming things that were mentioned about climate change is the continuous rise in sea levels owing to melting icecaps. This is caused by increased atmospheric temperature, but industrial emissions also pose a threat.While a majority of Guyana’s people reside on the coastland where the land is meters below sea level, global warming poses as a threat not only to the people but to rare species of animals as well.“Climate change became a major world problem and something that requires us all to unite together to urgently find solutions and to stop this global warming,” saidUNDP Resident Coordinator Mikiko TanakaTanaka.“By 2100, we will be another 65 centimetres below the sea. Storms around the world are worsening…” she added.Shanomae Rose of the Faculty of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Guyana was also among the list of speakers, who noted that talk on environmentalism should come from concern about what is happening and protection of our surroundings against degradation.“It is not only our concern but also our action. As youths, we need you to express your concerns, ask questions and take actions. In today’s society, we need to be a little more bold, because in order for us to create a Guyana that will be resilient, we need more actions,” said Rose.One of the topics that were discussed is the way forward, and sustainability is one of the directions that favoured the Earth. Another issue is the fact that the youths of today are not aware of what is happening in their communities because of the impact of social media and technology.“The only way we can get you engaged is if you remain informed … There are many ways for our young people to get involved,” she said.In the first half of this year, the Office of Climate Change (OCC) had pledged to continue its work to improve sustainability by executing projects, which were articulated in the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS).The LCDS is a national strategy launched under the previous Administration in 2009 and seeks to create a low-deforestation, low-carbon, climate-resilient economy with the objective of transforming the country while combating climate change. This is mainly through the projects to prevent deforestation and preserve forest resources.last_img

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