Referees overshadow Syracuse ice hockey’s season-opening loss to Bemidji State

first_img Published on October 1, 2016 at 12:37 am Contact Andrew: aegraham@syr.edu | @A_E_Graham Facebook Twitter Google+ First a Bemidji State fan yelled, “Ah, you suck. You didn’t have trouble blowing that whistle earlier,” in the direction of the referees. About a minute later, a Syracuse fan chimed in, “Hey, blow the whistle. Call that.”And it all culminated with a Bemidji State fan screaming, “Swallow your whistle, a**hole!”The referees were the story of the night Friday at Tennity Ice Pavilion as 14 penalties overshadowed Bemidji State’s (1-0) 2-1 victory over Syracuse (0-1). The two teams accumulated 28 minutes of penalties and more than 22 minutes on the power play. Syracuse’s only goal came on the power play. SU’s penalty kill shut out Bemidji State’s power play in six tries.“The girls might as well wear skirts out there,” Syracuse head coach Paul Flanagan said. “I’ve never seen anything like it. Seventeen penalties last Saturday night … probably about 15 penalties (tonight). It’s just ridiculous. They call everything so it’s really hard to get a flow going for the girls.”It started less than five minutes into the first period when SU’s Heather Schwarz was called for tripping. A little more than two minutes later, the Orange got whistled for another penalty trip, this time on Dakota Derrer.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThen Bemidji State took four penalties in a row, which led to a 5-on-3 and SU’s lone goal scored by Jessica Sibley. It was the only bright spot on the power play unit for SU, which finished 1-for-5.“We just need to win those battles, get to the puck first and make smarter plays.” Sibley said. “We need to come back tomorrow with a lot more energy. I think penalties like that, they wreck the flow of the game but there’s nothing we can control about that.”By the end of the first period, eight penalties had been called. SU was the beneficiary with only six penalty minutes and a one-goal lead. But the tide reversed in the second period.The Orange took three penalties in the first three minutes. Those penalties shifted momentum in favor of the Beavers and a little more than four minutes into the second, they knotted the score at one off the stick of Emily Bergland. Then Bemidji state successfully killed off three SU power plays in a row.“You try not to worry about the refs, but for sure they were calling a lot on both ends,” Orange defender Allie Munroe said. SU’s Karleigh Scully and Bemidji State’s Alexis Joyce had to sit on the bench for an extra 10 minutes after their penalties in the second period for “abuse of officials” infractions.Syracuse’s Savannah Rennie ended the second by getting called for tripping. She picked up the only penalty of the third period — interference. When the game ended, the coaches from both teams met on the ice and the first thing mentioned was the referees.“The first thing out of those (Bemidji State) coaches, from the different league (WCHA), ‘Are these the refs you have?’” Flanagan said. “I said, ‘Yeah these are two guys were going to see all the time.’ What are we going to do? We see those guys all year so I can’t bark at them. If you guys look at the WCHA, and look at how many power plays in their games tonight … I’d bet there are two, three, maybe four power plays total. (Bemidji State’s) kid stepped on a puck and we got called for tripping. There are two referees out there. They’ve got to call that. It’s mind boggling.” Commentslast_img read more

Crocs could leave teeth marks

first_img“I came home and typed in ‘Croc’ and ‘escalator,’ and all these stories came up,” said Jodi McDermott, of Vienna, Va. “If I had known, those would never have been worn.” According to reports appearing across the United States and as far away as Singapore and Japan, entrapments occur because of two of the biggest selling points of shoes like Crocs: their flexibility and grip. Some report the shoes get caught in the “teeth” at the bottom or top of the escalator, or in the crack between the steps and the side of the escalator. The reports of serious injuries have all involved young children. Crocs are commonly worn by children as young as 2. The company introduced shoes in its smallest size, 4/5, this past spring. Niwot, Colo.-based Crocs Inc. said it does not keep records of the reasons for customer-service calls. But the company said it is aware of “very few” problems relating to accidents involving the shoes, which are made of a soft, synthetic resin. “Thankfully, escalator accidents like the one in Virginia are rare,” the company said in a statement. In Japan, the government warned consumers last week that it has received 39 reports of sandals – mostly Crocs or similar products – getting stuck in escalators from late August through early September. Most of the reports appear to have involved small children, some as young as two years old. Kazuo Motoya of Japan’s National Institute of Technology and Evaluation said children may have more escalator accidents in part because they “bounce around when they stand on escalators, instead of watching where they place their feet.” In Singapore, a 2-year-old girl wearing rubber clogs – it’s unclear what brand – had her big toe completely ripped off in an escalator accident last year, according to local media reports. And at the Atlanta airport, a 3-year-old boy wearing Crocs suffered a deep gash across the top of his toes in June. That was one of seven shoe entrapments at the airport since May 1, and all but two of them involved Crocs, said Roy Springer, operations manager for the company that runs the airport terminal. One U.S. retailer that caters to children, Mattel subsidiary American Girl, has posted signs in three locations directing customers wearing Crocs or flip-flop sandals to use elevators instead of escalators. During the past two years, so-called “shoe entrapments” in the Washington subway have gone from being relatively rare to happening four or five times a week in the summer, though none has caused serious injuries, said Dave Lacosse, who oversees the subway’s 588 escalators, the most of any U.S. transit system. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said escalator accidents caused more than 10,000 injuries last year, but the agency has few records of specific shoe problems. Only two shoe entrapments have been reported by consumers since the beginning of 2006. One reported in May involved “rubber footwear.” Agency spokesman Ed Kang urged people who have had problems to report them on the commission’s Web site. Crocs officials said they were working with the Elevator Escalator Safety Foundation on public education initiatives. But the group’s executive director, Barbara Allen, said that’s not true. Allen said a Crocs official called her in September 2006 about possible cooperation, even suggesting the company might put a tag in its shoes with the foundation’s Web address. But since that first contact, Crocs has not called, and nobody from the company will return Allen’s calls, she said. Washington Metro’s Lacosse and other escalator experts say the best way to prevent shoe entrapments is to face the direction the stairs are moving, keep feet away from the sides and step over the teeth at the end. Lacosse, of the Washington subway system, said he is personally skittish of Crocs and other soft-soled shoes. “Would I wear them? No,” he said. “And I tell my children not to wear them either.” .160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON _ At rail stations and shopping malls around the world, reports are popping up of people, particularly young children, getting their toes caught in escalators. The one common theme seems to be the clunky soft-soled clogs known by the name of the most popular brand, Crocs. One of the nation’s largest subway systems – the Washington Metro – has even posted ads warning riders about wearing such shoes on its moving stairways. The ads feature a photo of a crocodile, though they don’t mention Crocs by name. Four-year-old Rory McDermott got a Croc-clad foot caught in an escalator last month at a mall in northern Virginia. His mother managed to yank him free, but the nail on his big toe was almost completely ripped off, causing heavy bleeding. At first, Rory’s mother had no idea what caused the boy’s foot to get caught. It was only later, when someone at the hospital remarked on Rory’s shoes, that she began to suspect the Crocs and did an Internet search. last_img read more