Budget Briefing: Schools that Teach

first_imgBudget Briefing: Schools that Teach SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Budget News,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Pennsylvania is at a crossroads. We can fund our schools and fix our deficit or we will be faced with an additional $1 billion in cuts to education funding. Governor Wolf is fighting to restore the cuts made by the previous administration, but inaction by the Republican-controlled legislature has left us with underfunded schools and a ballooning deficit. If we build on a bipartisan budget agreement by increasing school funding we can take on the status quo and finally give our students the resources they need to succeed. If we fail to invest in our schools, we will see larger class sizes, teacher layoffs, and skyrocketing property taxes.FAILURE TO ACTIt is time for the legislature to recognize the fiscal problem facing Pennsylvania and work with Governor Wolf to honestly eliminate the deficit. A failure to acknowledge our fiscal crisis will result in an additional $1 billion cut to education:Thousands of Teacher LayoffsThousands of teachers, guidance counselors, and career counselors will be laid off if the legislature fails to honestly address our deficit. In all, more than 23,000 education professionals could be forced out of Pennsylvania schools unless we take real steps to fix our unbalanced budget.Increasingly Crowded ClassroomsAcross Pennsylvania, already strained classrooms will become even more crowded. Class sizes will balloon by 30 percent as a result of teacher layoffs. Worse, the consequences will not be evenly distributed – classroom crowding will be most severe in the schools that can least afford it. But all across our commonwealth, our children will receive less attention, less instructional time, and less opportunity to gain the skills they need to succeed in the 21st century workforce.Program Cuts Technical education programs, special education programs, and Head Start programs will all face cuts if we fail to address Pennsylvania’s fiscal crisis.Eliminate Pre-K Tens of thousands of Pennsylvania children will lose access to pre-kindergarten, depriving them of early childhood education that we know is key to their future success.CHOOSING A RESPONSIBLE PATHGovernor Wolf’s 2016-2017 Budget presents a responsible path forward that will eliminate our deficit and fund our schools. We can choose this path that addresses our deficit to avoid critical program cuts and teacher layoffs and makes smart investments in schools to make sure our children are receiving the education they deserve.Significant Investments in EducationGovernor Wolf’s 2016-2017 Budget proposes that the state take its rightful share of the responsibility for funding our schools with real sources of revenue. Governor Wolf’s 2016-2017 Budget provides for:A $200 million (3.3 percent) increase in the Basic Education Subsidy. This increase above the assumed $377 million increase in 2015-­16, will be distributed using the Fair Funding Formula that was created and unanimously adopted by the bipartisan Basic Education Funding Commission in June 2015. The formula provides sufficient, predictable and equitable funding for school districts across the commonwealth, and includes student-­based factors like the number of children in the district who live in poverty or who are enrolled in charter schools, as well as district-­based factors such as the wealth of the district, the district’s current tax effort and the ability of the district to raise revenue.A $50 million (4.6 percent) increase in the Special Education Subsidy. This increase, in addition to the assumed $50 million increase in 2015-­16, will continue Pennsylvania’s transition to the funding formula enacted in 2015 to reflect the work of the bipartisan Special Education Funding Commission.A $60 million (30.5 percent) increase in high­-quality early childhood education. This funding increase builds upon the assumed $60 million investment in 2015­-16 to enroll about 14,000 children in Pennsylvania Pre-­K Counts and the Head Start Supplemental Assistance Program. In 2003, Pennsylvania joined the ranks of states that offer full-­day pre­kindergarten for 3-­ and 4-­year olds. Currently, only 30 percent of Pennsylvania children in families earning up to three times the federal poverty level – or $72,750 for a family of four – are enrolled in high ­quality pre­-k programs.Building a Bridge from High School to College and CareersPreparation for high-­skill careers must start long before most students even begin to think about college and careers. Fewer than half of Pennsylvania’s citizens have a college degree or industry-recognized certification. By 2025, roughly 60 percent of good­-paying, reliable jobs in the state will require these credentials. Across the nation, employers report difficulty finding qualified applicants and incur training costs for workers who lack necessary skills. To ensure that the next generation of Pennsylvanians ̶ those currently in middle school and high school – are prepared for the jobs of the future, we must begin to close the gap today.Over the next decade, Pennsylvania will seek to make a college degree or high-­value industry-recognized certification available to at least 650,000 additional commonwealth residents. The 2016­-17 Budget invests in programs that continue to modernize Career and Technical Education in Pennsylvania.The 2016­-17 Budget provides:$15 million in additional support for the establishment and expansion of high­-quality Career and Technical Education programs to prepare students for success in today’s economy. School districts, Career and Technology Centers, higher education institutions, employers and labor organizations can work together through public-private partnerships to train students for high ­priority occupations that pay a living wage and offer a career ladder for growth opportunities.Students will have the opportunity to earn college credit and industry credentials while participating in work-based learning.$5 million for Career and Technical Education Equipment Grants to support updating or purchasing new equipment used in the training of students. Priority will be given to Career and Technical Education grant applicants that show an in ­kind or monetary contribution from employers or other partners.$8 million to help school districts offer college and career counseling in middle and high schools to develop pathways to higher education and high-­skill careers.Reinvesting in Pennsylvania’s Institutions of Higher LearningThe 2016-­17 Budget reinvests in higher education by continuing Governor Wolf’s commitment to a four­-year restoration of the damaging cuts to our colleges and universities. In addition, the budget supports programs that help to achieve the goal of 60 percent of Pennsylvanians with a degree or high-value certificate by 2025.The combined funding increases in 2015-­16 and 2016-­17 for our higher education delivery system are as follows:Community Colleges. A $22.1 million increase for Pennsylvania’s 14 community colleges to achieve the degree, certificate or certification goals.PASSHE. A $42.3 million increase for the 14 universities that are part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.State­-Related Universities. A $59.7 million increase for Penn State University, the University of Pittsburgh, Temple University and Lincoln University. These resources will encourage innovation by helping the four public universities translate research into job creation. Read more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf February 09, 2016last_img read more

Southern states to sap Qld’s GST revenue gains: Moody’s

first_imgHome values dropped across the country in 2018. Picture: Penny Stephens.Earlier this month, CoreLogic data revealed national home values dropped 4.8 per cent in 2018, marking the weakest housing market since 2008.Brisbane bucked the trend, with values rising 1.2 per cent for the year. Moody’s says state governments are feeling pressure from the housing correction. Image: AAP/Troy Snook.The report singles out Queensland as being vulnerable to rising health and education costs because of its recent “rapid population growth”.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours agoIt forecasts an increase in capital spending in the state as a result, which would erode cash reserves and prompt the state government to issue additional debt.“Debt levels remain elevated, and we expect debt will continue to rise more rapidly than revenue as most states embark on record capital spending programs,” Moody’s senior credit officer John Manning said. Moody’s says GST reform has added revenue to Queensland, but it will not enough to offset the fall in stamp duty. Image: AAP/Darren England.In its most recent budget update, the Queensland government also marked down stamp duties by $240 million.But NSW and Victoria are expected to be hit the hardest.“Despite already projecting lower property-related revenue in their fiscal year 2019 budgets, the larger states of NSW and Victoria now forecast further declines in transfer duty and land tax revenue as a result of weakening residential property market prices and falling sales volumes,” Mr Manning said in the report.“Concurrently, Queensland projects a marginal decrease in average revenue growth over the forecast period, reflecting lower income from GST and dividends, more than offsetting increased royalties in FY2019, largely on higher coal prices.”center_img Moody’s says state governments are feeling pressure from the housing correction.THE property downturn led by the country’s two biggest housing markets is partly eroding Queensland’s revenue gains from reforms to GST funding, a new report warns.While the sunshine state is weathering the correction better than most states, Moody’s Investor Services says government debt levels remain high and could outpace revenue growth on capital spending programs.And while the recent GST reform has given Queensland an extra $518 million over the next eight years, the rating agency says it may not enough to offset the fall in stamp duty.last_img read more

Young Talent

first_imgIt is no longer a surprise when coaches bring some of their athletes to Coaches Corner.  Recently 3 young ladies from Batesville appeared with their soccer coach.  While the commercials were being run, he stated that the girls would handle the interview.  They answered the questions quickly and completed.  All the coach had to do that night was to simply summarize his season as they prepare for the sectional.These 3 girls were examples of almost every young person that the coaches bring to Coaches Corner these days.  Even though they have an idea of what I am going to ask, there is little hesitation, and even when I ask an unscripted question, there is no long pause or silence.  They simply go ahead and answer it.  They are not afraid of the mic like young people used to be.Contrast this to one of the first young people I interviewed after a regional basketball game.  This young athlete sank the winning shot in a back and forth game.  After I asked the first question, he simply nodded his head.  I had to take a commercial break so I could calm him down.  I remember telling him that this was radio and the audience couldn’t see or hear him shake his head.  Even after that, I don’t think he gave more than a 3-word answer to any of my questions.  This was typical in the old days. Thank heaven for today’s youth.last_img read more

Tim Payne, 59, Winfield: May 20, 1954 – Sept. 7, 2013

first_imgTim PayneTim D. Payne, of Winfield, died Saturday, September 7, 2013 at the William Newton Memorial Hospital in Winfield at the age of 59.Timothy was born the son of Chester D. and Billie Lee (Roth) Payne on Thursday, May 20, 1954 in Wellington. His parents preceded him in death.On July 20, 1980, Tim and Pam Cooke were united in marriage in Coffeyville. Together they celebrated 33 years of marriage.He graduated from Wellington High School with the Class of 1972. Following high school, Tim became a proud member of the United States Navy. He later went on to earn his Masters Degree and was a Special Education Teacher. Tim worked in several communities such as Winfield, Pratt, and Arkansas City and retired after 25 years of service.Survivors include his wife, Pam Payne of Winfield, brothers: Mike Payne and his wife Janice of Temple, Texas, Pat Payne of Wichita, Jeff Payne and his wife Sheila of Overbrook, sisters: Lana Glaysher and her husband Doug of Bentonville, Arkansas and Dee Graves and her husband Dick of Winfield along with several nieces and nephews.Memorial services for Tim will be held at 3:30 p.m., Thursday, September 12, 2013 at the Prairie Lawn Cemetery, Wellington. Military honors will be provided.Memorials have been established in his loving memory with Cowley County Humane Society, 7648 222nd Road, Winfield 67156. Contributions can be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellingtonlast_img read more