Over $500,000 worth of heavy equipment reported stolen

first_imgIt’s alleged that over $500,000 worth of heavy equipment has been stolen in Tumbler Ridge.Tumbler Ridge RCMP said they received a report on July 15 saying that the equipment was missing from a local drilling company’s lay-down site on the South Grizzly Forest Service Road near Tumbler Ridge.The company had stored the vehicles there since September 2014.- Advertisement -The reported vehicles stolen include a dozer, excavator, two trailers, two water pumps and an unknown amount of tools. It’s estimated that the total value of the stolen equipment is estimated to be over half a million dollars.Photos of the missing equipment can be found above in the slideshow.If anyone has any information the Tumbler Ridge RCMP ask you to contact their Detachment at 250-242-5252 or call Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477Advertisementlast_img read more

Rice University experts available to comment on looming sequestration and potential impacts

first_imgShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduJeff Falk713-348-6775jfalk@rice.eduRice University experts available to comment on looming sequestration and potential impactsHOUSTON – (Feb. 26, 2013) – Just a few days remain before new government spending cuts take effect March 1, pending any 11th-hour action by President Barack Obama and Congress. Regardless of full or partial sequestration, what will the impacts be nationally and locally here in Texas?The following Rice University experts are available to comment:Mark Jones, professor and chair of political science and a fellow at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, can comment on the politics of the sequestration debate and the role Obama and Congress play in navigating the crisis.Bob Stein, the Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and a fellow in urban politics at the Baker Institute, can discuss sequestration impacts on a local level and the surrounding public opinion and public-policy issues.John Diamond, an economist and the Edward A. and Hermena Hancock Kelly Fellow in Public Finance at the Baker Institute, can discuss federal tax and expenditure policy issues related to the current sequestration debate.Christopher Bronk, the Baker Institute’s fellow in information technology policy, can discuss the impact sequestration cuts may have on the nation’s efforts to improve government and private-sector cybersecurity measures.Vicki Colvin, vice provost for research, can discuss how research at Rice could be affected by cutbacks in federal funding. Colvin is also Rice’s Kenneth S. Pitzer-Schlumberger Professor of Chemistry and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.The Baker Institute has a radio and television studio available for media who want to schedule an interview with one of these experts. For more information, contact Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at jfalk@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Bronk biography: http://bakerinstitute.org/personnel/fellows-scholars/cbronk.Jones biography: http://bakerinstitute.org/personnel/fellows-scholars/mjones.Stein biography: http://bakerinstitute.org/personnel/fellows-scholars/rstein.Diamond biography: http://bakerinstitute.org/personnel/fellows-scholars/jdiamond.Colvin biography: http://chemistry.rice.edu/FacultyDetail.aspx?RiceID=602Founded in 1993, the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston ranks among the top 20 university-affiliated think tanks globally and top 30 think tanks in the United States. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows and Rice University scholars. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog. AddThislast_img read more

Students monitor will help moms in labor

first_img A puck-like device with a pressure-sensitive membrane is the central component in a system to monitor the contractions of women in labor. The device developed by Rice University bioengineering students is intended to help medical personnel in low-resource settings keep track of their patients. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Rice University bioengineering student Catherine Schult mounts a puck-like sensor to a beach ball, which served as a stand-in for women in labor who will benefit from the contraction monitor device. Rice students built the monitor to help medical personnel in low-resource settings keep track of their patients. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionA puck-like device with a pressure-sensitive membrane is the central component in a system to monitor the contractions of women in labor. Photo by Jeff FitlowThe heart of the Rice device is a puck-like sensor that presses against the patient’s abdomen and is held in place by a robust, washable rubber and nylon belt designed by the team to lessen the need for disposable supplies and cut the risk of infection. Contracting muscles move a membrane on the sensor, which in turn moves an LED on the inside closer to a photoresistor that measures the intensity of the light and determines the voltage output to a microcontroller. That sends information about the contractions to the user interface in real time.When contractions become more frequent or indicate a risk to the patient, a box attached to the computer will light up and sound an alarm, Antwi-Nsiah said. “When they’re outside of a safe physiological range for more than 10 minutes, the audible and visual cues will become more intense,” she said. Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University bioengineering student Catherine Schult mounts a puck-like sensor to a beach ball, which served as a stand-in for women in labor who will benefit from the contraction monitor device. Photo by Jeff FitlowEventually, the monitor will likely be tested in maternity wards at hospitals in Malawi, where the Rice 360˚ Institute for Global Health is working to solve the challenges they and other low-resource hospitals face.“Maternal mortality is a large problem in Malawi,” said Leah Sherman, one of two team members who has spent time there with Rice 360˚. “We’ve seen the wards, which isn’t something you can easily forget, and we all have a passion for bringing the maternal mortality rate down. Of all of the bioengineering projects we were offered, this one seemed the most powerful and impactful for a community that is in dire need.”Sherman and Mildred Antwi-Nsiah, who has also worked in Malawi, were joined in the effort by teammates Aniket Tolpadi, Patricia DaSilva, Shannon Fei and Catherine Schult. All spent long days this school year at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen (OEDK), where some designed and programmed the sensor and monitoring algorithm and others pieced together a method to test their invention.“In Malawi, nurses are supposed to perform a partograph, in which they manually measure contractions every 30 minutes for 10 minutes, but the patient-to-nurse ratio is 15-to-1, so it’s not physically possible to adequately monitor all the patients,” Sherman said. “Most mothers there go unmonitored for the majority of their labor.” ShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to video and high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduStudents’ monitor will help moms in laborRice U. seniors design and build a contraction monitor for mothers-to-be in low-resource settingsHOUSTON – (April 2, 2018) – Rice University seniors are developing an efficient and inexpensive uterine contraction monitor to help save the lives of mothers in labor and their newborns in resource-poor settings.A team of bioengineering students who call themselves Contractionally Obligated designed, built and programmed not only a sensor to monitor women in labor but also a unique test rig. They plan to validate the monitor’s accuracy with the help of faculty at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and their patients. Return to article. Long DescriptionThe Contractionally Obligated team, from left: Shannon Fei, Aniket Tolpadi, Leah Sherman, Patricia DaSilva, Mildred Antwi-Nsiah and Catherine Schult. Photo by Jeff FitlowValidation will be done in parallel with devices used by UTHealth faculty in their practices, though the Rice team won’t hook up its graphical interface so attending physicians will only have access to their own monitors, Schult said. “Also, for some women who have higher-risk pregnancies, they often monitor them with an intrauterine pressure catheter (IUPC), which is the gold standard and very accurate.“If our device detects 70 percent of contractions relative to those detected by that (IUPC) technology, it will be equivalent to the tocodynamometer used in the United States, which is our base goal.”Contractionally Obligated will demonstrate its device at the annual George R. Brown School of Engineering Design Showcase April 12 at Rice’s Tudor Fieldhouse. The event opens to the public at 4:30 p.m., with the winners of cash prizes announced at 7. More than 80 teams are expected to compete this year.-30-Read about the project at http://oedk.rice.edu/Sys/PublicProfile/41443332/4330110Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsVideo: http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/03/0402_CONTRACTION-1-WEB-yxkose.jpgRice University seniors adjust their prototype to monitor the contractions of women in labor. Their device is intended to help nurses monitor their patients in low-resource settings, such as hospitals in Malawi. From left: Patricia DaSilva, Aniket Tolpadi, Mildred Antwi-Nsiah and Shannon Fei. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) https://youtu.be/lw2de-6x3GkVideo produced by Brandon Martin/Rice UniversityRelated materials:George R. Brown School of Engineering: https://engineering.rice.eduRice Department of Bioengineering: https://bioengineering.rice.eduImages for download:Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University bioengineering student Patricia DaSilva wires up her team’s contraction monitor at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen. Photo by Jeff FitlowBecause contractions can last between 30 seconds and three minutes, the team’s test device had to deliver a gradual increase and decrease in pressure to the sensor. A beach ball hooked to a set of microcontroller-controlled solenoids was the answer. “We started with a hand pump, but it was hard to get the nice, smooth curves you would get in real life,” Schult said.The contraction monitor is designed to cost less than $100, according to the team.The students plan to test the monitor under the supervision of Dr. Suneet Chauhan, a professor in UTHealth’s Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences. Chauhan is co-advising the team with OEDK Director Maria Oden, a teaching professor in bioengineering; Eric Richardson, a lecturer in bioengineering, and Jennifer Carns, a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Rice 360˚ Director Rebecca Richards-Kortum. The Contractionally Obligated team of Rice University bioengineering students have developed an efficient and inexpensive uterine contraction monitor to help save the lives of mothers in labor and their newborns in resource-poor settings. From left: Shannon Fei, Aniket Tolpadi, Leah Sherman, Patricia DaSilva, Mildred Antwi-Nsiah and Catherine Schult. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Rice University bioengineering student Catherine Schult mounts a puck-like sensor to a beach ball, which served as a stand-in for women in labor who will benefit from the contraction monitor device. Rice students built the monitor to help medical personnel in low-resource settings keep track of their patients. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Rice University bioengineering student Patricia DaSilva wires up her team’s contraction monitor at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen. DaSilva is part of a team of seniors designing the monitor to help women in low-resource settings like Rice’s partner hospitals in Malawi. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)center_img http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/03/0402_CONTRACTION-2-WEB-wks43o.jpgRice University bioengineering student Catherine Schult mounts a puck-like sensor to a beach ball, which served as a stand-in for women in labor who will benefit from the contraction monitor device. Rice students built the monitor to help medical personnel in low-resource settings keep track of their patients. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/03/0402_CONTRACTION-5-WEB-1ocxnrc.jpgThe Contractionally Obligated team of Rice University bioengineering students have developed an efficient and inexpensive uterine contraction monitor to help save the lives of mothers in labor and their newborns in resource-poor settings. From left: Shannon Fei, Aniket Tolpadi, Leah Sherman, Patricia DaSilva, Mildred Antwi-Nsiah and Catherine Schult. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. A puck-like device with a pressure-sensitive membrane is the central component in a system to monitor the contractions of women in labor. The device developed by Rice University bioengineering students is intended to help medical personnel in low-resource settings keep track of their patients. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis Rice University bioengineering student Patricia DaSilva wires up her team’s contraction monitor at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen. DaSilva is part of a team of seniors designing the monitor to help women in low-resource settings like Rice’s partner hospitals in Malawi. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) The Contractionally Obligated team of Rice University bioengineering students have developed an efficient and inexpensive uterine contraction monitor to help save the lives of mothers in labor and their newborns in resource-poor settings. From left: Shannon Fei, Aniket Tolpadi, Leah Sherman, Patricia DaSilva, Mildred Antwi-Nsiah and Catherine Schult. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/03/0402_CONTRACTION-3-WEB-t0gaa2.jpgRice University bioengineering student Patricia DaSilva wires up her team’s contraction monitor at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen. DaSilva is part of a team of seniors designing the monitor to help women in low-resource settings like Rice’s partner hospitals in Malawi. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/03/0402_CONTRACTION-4-WEB-1ii4bph.jpgA puck-like device with a pressure-sensitive membrane is the central component in a system to monitor the contractions of women in labor. The device developed by Rice University bioengineering students is intended to help medical personnel in low-resource settings keep track of their patients. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Return to article. Long Descriptionlast_img read more