Nick Mariano shines, but not bright enough for Syracuse in loss to Cornell

first_img Published on April 12, 2016 at 11:06 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories Syracuse suffers 10-9 defeat to Cornell in overtimecenter_img ITHACA, N.Y. — The game was tied, and then it wasn’t. Then it was tied again and Syracuse regained its lead. Cornell answered. This time, the tie only lasted 40 seconds.On three occasions, Nick Mariano broke the deadlock. In a game notable for the back-and-forth battle between the two teams, Mariano was the one who allowed the Orange to keep poking its head above water.As the overtime bout hung in the balance, the most crucial tiebreak didn’t go to the junior midfielder. Instead, the Big Red broke the final tie and Cornell celebrated the goal which ended the extra frame and led to its 10-9 win.“We wanted a bigger lead and that’s what we were trying to do offensively,” Mariano said. “But that didn’t happen.”And Mariano’s not to blame. All four of his goals extended No. 9 Syracuse’s (6-4, 1-2 Atlantic Coast) lead in the eventual one-goal loss to Cornell (5-5, 1-3 Ivy) at Schoellkopf Field. The four scores were a season-high for Mariano who previously hadn’t played midfield since he was in sixth grade. He’s used to taking on defenders with long poles and exploited the favorable matchup on Tuesday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn two previous overtime games this season, the Orange’s offense never touched the ball. This time, Ben Williams won the opening faceoff and SU quickly called timeout to set up a play.After cycling the ball around for nearly a minute and a half, Derek DeJoe sprinted toward the goal from the right wing. He nearly got to the goal-line and unleashed a low-angle shot that flew beyond the opposite sideline.Syracuse head coach John Desko said Mariano’s defender had a short stick.“I wanted the ball definitely,” Mariano said.“I wanted him to have the ball at the end also,” Desko said.Mariano never took a shot on the Orange’s only possession in the extra period and Cornell scored on its first chance with the ball.What he did during the first 60 minutes, though, was enough to leave one of the biggest imprints in a game that teetered from one side to the other.“Nick had the hot hand,” Desko said.Mariano’s second goal came when he caught a pass from Jordan Evans about 10 yards in front of the net. The lefty wound up with his dominant hand and fired a sidearm shot toward the center of the goal, but it snuck just under the crossbar. Syracuse, 4-3.His next came off a roll dodge from the left side of the field. As Mariano switched his stick into his left hand, he leapt off the ground to generate power and scored his third goal to record his fifth hat trick of the season. Syracuse, 8-7.After Cornell tied it up at eight, Mariano had the answer again 40 seconds later. Another lefty rip. Another broken tie. Except this time, Mariano barely celebrated. He kept his arms at his sides and simply started walking toward the sideline. It was becoming routine. Syracuse, 9-8.“He was shooting the ball extremely well,” Desko said. “He had the opportunities he was put in, he was dodging hard, he was playing with a lot of confidence.”For the past eight years, Mariano had played attack. In two years at Massachusetts, he often drew opponents’ best defenders. He switched to midfield before the season and 10 games into his career, he’s still occasionally drawing short sticks even as the Orange’s leading goal scorer.That’s what helped open him up several times against the Big Red.“When I get a shortie on me, I get a little red in the eye,” Mariano said.After the game, a father and son stood near reporters and watched as Syracuse packed up its truck for the 53-mile drive back to SU. The son, wearing an orange jersey, posed for a photo with Desko as his dad captured the moment with his phone.Moments later, Mariano finished fielding questions from the media just a few yards away from the field he had his best game at Syracuse on.“He played great,” the father said to his son.But then Mariano turned around, the lights on top of reporters’ cameras turned off and he walked back to the Orange’s locker room. It didn’t matter how great Mariano played. Commentslast_img read more

Friday is deadline for requesting absentee ballot for Primary

first_imgDES MOINES — Almost 400,000 Iowans have asked for an absentee ballot for the June 2nd Primary and early voting is likely to set an all-time record for a primary.“People have listened and they heard. They got the message: let’s vote safe, let’s vote from home right now,” says Secretary of State Paul Pate, the state’s commissioner of elections.His office mailed absentee ballot request forms to every registered Iowa voter, encouraging Iowans to ask their county auditor for the vote-by-mail option rather than in-person voting on Primary Day.“I think the pandemic has put a much stronger emphasis on voting,” Pate says. “People are at home. They’re paying attention to what the government’s doing.”The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot is Friday at 5 p.m. and officials suggest any request sent through the U.S. Postal Service be mailed today to ensure it gets to the county auditor on time. Polk County Auditor Jamie Fitzgerald says in Iowa’s largest county, an average of about 9000 people typically ask for an absentee ballot for a Primary. His office has already processed 10,000 “and we still have 54,000 requests,” Fitzgerald says.While there will be in-person voting available on Primary day, election officials like Fitzgerald are encouraging Iowans to use this vote-at-home option.“We are in the pandemic,” Fitzgerald says. “You have people now that are voting safely, making sure they don’t spread the virus.”Pate says Iowa National Guard soldiers distributed personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies to county auditors last week that will be used by poll workers at precinct voting sites on June 2nd. Each voting booth will be cleaned between uses. Some counties plan to offer voters gloves. In Polk County, each Primary Day voter will be given their own pen to use and take with them after they cast their ballot.“We want Iowans to be able to vote,” Pate says. “We want them to be able to vote safely and we want our poll workers to be safe.”Fitzgerald says in Polk County — and most others — the number of precincts have been reduced, to ensure there’s enough space inside for social distancing and to make sure there are enough poll workers.“I don’t want to wake up like they did in Wisconsin and find out that 400 people have quit, so we’re constantly training,” Fitzgerald says. “We’re constantly talking to our poll workers.”Pate predicts as many as 70 percent of ballots cast in the June Primary, however, will be absentee ballots. He says Iowans can track their absentee ballots on www.voterready.iowa.gov.“When the auditor’s office receives your request i’ll show that. It’ll show when the auditor sends (the absentee ballot) out. It’ll show when it got back to the auditor’s office, Pate says, “so you know it got there.”The two election officials made their comments this weekend on the “Iowa Press” program on Iowa PBS. They both are urging Iowans voting by mail to avoid a common mistake — and remember to sign and date the ballot.last_img read more