On the Blogs: Coal Power Risks Grow

first_imgOn the Blogs: Coal Power Risks Grow FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Hindustan Times:The economics of coal-fired power generation is incredibly vulnerable, much more so than is recognised. Coal is particularly at risk from competition from low cost renewables, volatile commodity prices, growing concerns about air pollution, worsening water availability for cooling, the increasing incidence of heat waves that reduce operating efficiencies and, of course, necessary action to tackle climate change. These factors in combination are driving the structural decline of coal, led by China. According to Wood MacKenzie, coal use in China has dropped by 40% in the last five years.According to Morgan Stanley, solar power in India has recently reached a tipping point, becoming more affordable than coal. Other Asian economies already seem to understand the dynamic of coal being highly risky. For example, South Korea’s newly elected President Moon Jae-In’s is moving to phase out coal and shift into solar and wind. Taiwan is expanding its renewable energy plans whilst reducing its reliance on coal by a third, from 45% to 30% by 2025.Analysts now argue that coal usage in India will peak in the next five to 10 years. India will join China, and other East Asian economies, in halting new coal growth. No new coal plants are set to be commissioned for the coming decade, according to the Central Electricity Authority’s draft plan. And 37GW of old coal could be shut down, while Coal India is set to close 37 mines. This is the right approach and should be futher accelerated, otherwise Indian utilities focused on coal could face significant stranded assets and financial underperformance. This is what happened to European utilities that bet big on coal.While Europe and India are at different stages of development, the European experience shows how investing in coal can go badly wrong. Between 2005 and 2008, European power companies planned to build 65 new coal-fired power plants, with 49 gigawatts (GW) of capacity, but only 12 were actually built. More cancellations are expected.In Germany alone, 20 GW has been cancelled. The economics of existing plants have deteriorated too. For example, in the UK coal use fell by over half in 2016 and the country’s power system now experiences coal-free days for the first time since the 1880s.More: Why Indian power companies must dump coal and bet big on solar, windlast_img read more

FA panel to discuss Scudamore case

first_img The FA’s inclusion advisory board (IAB), chaired by independent FA board member Heather Rabbatts, will look into Scudamore’s emails and the Premier League’s process in handling the case. Scudamore spoke of his “sincere contrition” after the clubs decided against any further disciplinary action and said he would hold a series of meetings across football’s administration to reassure them of his commitment to promote women in the game. Ouseley said: “The Prime Minister stated earlier today that he wouldn’t tolerate these types of comments in his own cabinet. A decision like this and the way it was made reflects the dominance, strength and culture at the very top of the football pyramid. Ouseley also claimed the Premier League’s process in dealing with Scudamore was “flawed”. Ouseley said: “Richard Scudamore is one of the most successful and powerful men in world football. The outcome of the proceedings into the revealed emails and their contents leaves the status quo intact. “The process adopted by the Premier League is a flawed one and there was only ever going to be one outcome. It is incumbent on the Premier League to put in place a proper, objective, fair and independent process for dealing with such important matters in future.” The row has gone to the very top of British politics, however, with Prime Minister David Cameron saying the sexist emails highlighted the need for people to treat others with respect. Cameron said he had not personally read the messages sent by Scudamore, but that high standards had to be maintained. Asked if a minister would survive in their job if they admitted sexist behaviour, he told BBC Radio 5 Live: “I don’t think they would. “I have to be careful what I say because I haven’t seen these specific emails, but…we have to set and keep high standards in politics. “I have tried to enforce that in my own party.” He added: “I haven’t actually seen the emails myself but obviously people should treat everybody else with respect.” West Ham vice-chairman Karren Brady insisted Scudamore “is categorically not sexist”, but said she was disappointed to learn of the emails. The head of anti-discrimination group Kick It Out, Lord Herman Ouseley, said Cameron’s statements showed the need for change in football. A Football Association equality panel will meet on Tuesday to discuss the Richard Scudamore sexist emails case after the Premier League chief executive received full backing from clubs. Press Associationlast_img read more