Inn at Saint Mary’s holds student photography contest

first_imgPhotography by three Saint Mary’s seniors will decorate the walls of the Inn at Saint Mary’s even after they graduate from the College on Saturday. Seniors Julie McGrail, Elizabeth Munger and Guadalupe Quintana are the winners of a photography contest hosted by the Inn, and their work will decorate the walls of its guest rooms. The Inn at Saint Mary’s was renovating 11 guest rooms last fall when one of its owners decided to replace the existing photos with new images, general manager Kim Kudelka said. The contest opened in December. The owners of The Inn selected the three students’ photographs from over 150 photos submitted to the contest. The Inn announced the contest winners in March. “At The Inn, we felt that we needed to get back our strong relationship with the College,” Kim Kudelka said. “I have been working here for 10 years, and we all thought it was time to rebuild the relationship. This photo contest was a great way for us to begin.” The new photos capture scenes from the College campus, she said. “The old photos were pretty conservative and dated,” Kudelka said. “The ones that we have chosen bring light to the new rooms, and add more of the Saint Mary’s charm to each room.” Munger said she had already taken pictures of campus when she received the email about entering the photo contest. “My dad takes pictures, and I was given a big, professional camera for my high school graduation, so I also really enjoy taking pictures,” Munger said. “When I received the email, I already knew which pictures I wanted to send in.” Munger’s chosen photo, titled “Reflection on Lake Marian,” depicts Haggar Hall reflected on the lake on the Saint Mary’s campus. During a walk from Notre Dame to Saint Mary’s campus, Quintana said she decided to take a snapshot of the trees lining the Avenue. “I just happened to have my camera, a small digital one, and saw a perfect picture to capture of the fall leaves and trees,” Quintana said. “My photo is titled, ‘A Belle’s Walk Home.’” McGrail said she had a folder of photos taken on a walk from Saint Mary’s to Notre Dame last spring. “I sent in about five different pictures, and two of them were chosen to be displayed,” McGrail said. “They are titled ‘Spring at Lake Marian’ and ‘Spring at the Grotto.’” The seniors said they were all equally surprised to find out they won the contest. “I was excited because the Inn is so pretty and so many people stay there when they are in town,” Munger said. Quintana said she was surprised the Inn chose her photo out of from 150 submissions. “This was really nice because I am a senior and it is something that I can leave behind at Saint Mary’s,” Quintana said. The Inn honored the winners in April for their achievement. “There was a reception held at The Inn for each of the winners where we were able to see our photos blown up, framed and hanging up in the renovated rooms,” McGrail said. “There is a suite that holds all of the photos that won the contest. It was really amazing to see our work hanging up at The Inn.” So far, the Inn has received tremendous feedback on the new rooms with the new photographs, Kudelka said. “We plan on holding another contest for more photos to be displayed in more renovated rooms,” Kudelka said. “We really want the relationship between The Inn and the College to get back to the way it was.” As they prepare for Commencement on Saturday, the three seniors said they were glad to leave a lasting mark on Saint Mary’s. “This contest was such a great way to have a student’s perspective of their home they have lived in for the past four years,” McGrail said. “It is truly a wonderful collaboration.”last_img read more

Morning fuel

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaBacon, eggs, biscuits, fruit, omelets, pancakes, turkey-and-cheese sandwich — one of those items doesn’t make the typical breakfast list. But a University of Georgia nutrition expert says it’s not necessarily the normal that makes the best breakfast.When it comes to starting the day off, the best breakfast is the one that gets eaten.“People who skip breakfast miss out on vitamins, minerals and fiber that they need,” said Kelly Bryant, a UGA Cooperative Extension nutrition education specialist. “Breakfast is an easy way to get nutrients such as calcium and vitamin C in your diet. Pick foods from three to five food groups. They don’t have to be traditional breakfast foods.”A turkey-and-cheese sandwich on whole wheat bread with a half-cup of 100-percent juice provides items from four food groups. An English muffin minipizza with a piece of fruit or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole wheat bread with a glass of milk covers three food groups.“Leftovers from the night before are fine,” Bryant said. “Even cold pizza is fine, although it would probably be good to have fruit or juice with it.”Breakfast is about putting fuel into the body, she said. After eight to 12 hours of fasting while asleep, you need breakfast to help prepare for the day’s activities, especially when you’re a child.“While nothing can take the place of studying hard, eating a healthful breakfast daily will help give you the edge you need to do these things,” she said. “Research shows that people who eat breakfast daily tend to be better nourished overall than those who do not.”Breakfast is important for people of all ages. But as children get older, they tend to eat breakfast less often.“The main reason given for this is that many older children and adolescents feel like they don’t have enough time,” Bryant said. “The second is that many students are concerned about their weight. And sometimes they don’t eat because they’re not hungry.”Recent research has shown that eating breakfast may help prevent children from becoming overweight. But while eating breakfast is better than going without, Bryant says some foods should be limited.“Limit foods with increased amounts of added sugar and fats like donuts, pastries and soft drinks,” she said. “Soft drinks, especially for children, crowds out important nutrients they should be getting from milk and juice.“Look for 100-percent juice,” she said. “If the carton says ‘fruit drink’ or ‘fruit beverage,’ it has little to no juice in it and has added sugar.”For parents and adults with crazy schedules, Bryant said, it’s best to have easy breakfast foods available.She suggests keeping whole grain cereal, peanut butter, string cheese, 100-percent juice, bagels, English muffins, yogurt, fruit and low-fat milk on hand.Add fruit and milk or cheese to a pop tart or toaster strudel, she said. Or try these quick and easy breakfasts:* Waffle sandwich: Put peanut butter and honey or syrup between two waffles. Add fruit.* Tortilla roll-ups: Spread peanut butter on a tortilla, top with banana slices and roll it up.* Bagel minipizza: Top a whole wheat bagel or English muffin with tomato sauce and cheese and pop it in the microwave or toaster oven.Other quick, healthy options are a bowl of instant oatmeal or some dry cereal paired with yogurt and fruit.If a drive-through restaurant provides breakfast, choose an egg-and-cheese English muffin over a fried chicken or sausage biscuit. Some places may offer a fruit and yogurt cup, and most offer low-fat milk. And that carton of fruit juice “is a good way to add fruit,” Bryant said.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

IHS Markit says green hydrogen will be cost competitive by 2030

first_imgIHS Markit says green hydrogen will be cost competitive by 2030 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:The price penalty the industry pays on green hydrogen is set to fall over the next decade, according to a new study on hydrogen economics by IHS Markit.This year will likely be remembered as a turning point for hydrogen. Policymakers have prioritized a range of project announcements, reports, and legislative packages to give impetus to the development of this new energy carrier. Rapidly falling costs for hydrogen are also driving this wave of announcements.“Costs for producing green hydrogen have fallen 50% since 2015 and could be reduced by an additional 30% by 2025 due to the benefits of increased scale and more standardized manufacturing, among other factors,” said Simon Blakey, a senior adviser for global gas at IHS Markit.Green hydrogen produced via renewables-powered electrolysis is the preferred hydrogen fuel, as the splitting of water does not release any carbon into the atmosphere. The International Energy Agency (IEA) states that 1 kilogram of green hydrogen, containing about 33.3 kWh, comes in at €3.50 to €5, which is anywhere between €0.10/kWh and 0.15/kWh.Reforming methane from natural gas, meanwhile, releases carbon into the atmosphere, but is considerably cheaper. The IEA says that the natural gas-based form of hydrogen, grey hydrogen, costs €1.5/kg or €0.045/kWh. According to IHS Markit’s analysts that price delta is set to close over the next 10 years, due to economies of scale and renewable energy deployment.The rapidly falling costs of wind and solar have already had a considerable impact on the price development of green hydrogen. With mammoth projects underway or in development, additional price reductions in all required technologies can be expected. Australian renewable energy producer Austrom Hydrogen announced plans just a few weeks ago for a 3.6 GW solar-powered hydrogen facility in Queensland.[Marian Willuhn]More: Green hydrogen to reach price parity with grey hydrogen in 2030last_img read more

48 Hours in Morganton, NC

first_imgDriving along I-40 across North Carolina, many BRO readers may be apt to cruise past one of the most perfect hubs of outdoor adventure in the Blue Ridge and not even realize their unfortunate mistake.  At the eastern gateway to the North Carolina mountains and situated at the midway point between Asheville and Charlotte, the foothills town of Morganton (population: 17,000+) possesses a charming and buzzing downtown that serves as the perfect base camp for exploration. In addition to great restaurants, breweries, parks, shops, and greenways within the town itself, only a drive of a few minutes will place you in the midst of a dizzying array of mountains, cliffs, waterfalls, lakes, rivers, swimming holes, and more multisport options than you can ever imagine. So let’s get started….Day One:Hike Linville Gorge’s Shortoff Mountain Established as one of the first wilderness areas in the U.S. and also reigning as the deepest canyon in the east, the nearly 12,000-acre Linville Gorge Wilderness Area could itself alone provide for a lifetime of adventures. Craggy peaks, cliffs, caves, and the rugged and wild Linville River in the bottom of the gorge offer all levels of challenge to would-be explorers. One of the best and closest gorge hikes from town that also provides constant and epic views is Shortoff Mountain. Pick up a good map at the local outfitter CBS Sports before striking out and head to the end of Wolfpit Rd. off of Hwy.126 to find the trailhead. If you are seeking a guide company for partial-day or multiple-day treks in the gorge, call the good folks at Hike More Adventures.Paddling and mountain biking in Lake James State ParkVery close to the trailhead for Shortoff Mountain along Hwy 126, you will find the Paddy’s Creek area of Lake James State Park. This 6,812 acre lake with over 150 miles of shoreline is a refreshing jewel that offers a perfect sandy beach for swimming, kayak rentals for only $5 and $3 per hour as well as 15 miles of recently designed flowing singletrack perfect for beginner and intermediate mountain bikers. Click here for more info.IMG_2448.JPGLake James State Park – photo by Justin CostnerGreenways, disc golf, adventure playgrounds…and a life-size Ewok village?Back in town the 4.8 mile Catawba River Greenway is a smooth paved trail that hugs the river and eventually terminates in the beautiful 230-acre Catawba Meadows Park. Here you have a range of options including a forested 18-hole disc golf course, a wild adventure ropes playground for the kiddos and best of all…The Beanstalk Journey, an exhilarating blend of ziplines, canopy tour, and ropes course designed and owned by the local and legendary Outward Bound pioneer Mike Fischesser. This amazing and elaborate adventure complex is breathtaking just to look at much less to experience firsthand. Find out more details on the greenway, park, and Beanstalk Journey here.DSC_0078Cycling the Catawba River Greenway – photo courtesy of the City of MorgantonDay Two:Fishing, swimming and hiking in the wild Wilson Creek drainageWilson Creek is born on the high slopes of 5,920 ft. Grandfather Mountain and 20 miles later rushes through a gorgeous granite bedrock gorge. With 25 plus miles of trails and 39,000 acres this wild and rugged playground is a haven for kayakers, anglers, and swimming hole enthusiasts. Although you could easily spend all day here, an 8 mile out and back trip to Harper Creek Falls and Bard Falls will lead you to two of our favorite waterfalls and provide a good taste of what makes this area so special. For more detailed local fishing beta, check out Upper Creek Angler.11304402_10153423756618120_220780415_nBard Falls – photo by Brandon ThrowerBiking and running in the largest State Park in North CarolinaWith over 18,000 acres and 45 miles of trails, South Mountains State Park is the state’s largest in the system and offers a grueling 17-mile mountain biking loop that provides great views from a lot of gnarly forest roads. If you are more interested in exploring on foot, run or hike a nice 3 mile loop to witness one of the park’s gems: the 80 foot High Shoal Falls and the beautifully rock-strewn corridor of Jacob’s Fork River.11091224_10153423758178120_1618443394_nSouth Mountains – photo by Brandon ThrowerFood:Downtown Morganton has the great fortune of possessing two outstanding craft breweries only mere blocks from one another and a number of great dining options that span all budgets. Here are some of our favorites:The Grind Café – The place where all the locals know to go before their big day outdoors. Located downtown on Union St., this café/wine bar/coffee shop offers pastries, quiche, breakfast burritos, smoothies, strong coffee, and much more. Judge’s Riverside – Right off the greenway, hit this place up at lunch for some of the best BBQ and down home cooking around. Even better than the food itself is the setting…expansive patios and decks that offer outside dining while overlooking the Catawba River.Wisteria Southern Gastropub: Fantastic locally-grown, sustainable, and fresh farm-to-table cuisine blending classic Southern fare with new and exciting flavors.Root and Vine: Some of the finest dining in town. You will find French-influenced dishes incorporating seasonal local produce, fresh seafood, and a vast array of beer, wine and cocktails.MoonDog Pizza: The best pie in town! You will find delicious and creative toppings and combinations here at a great value.Libations and Nightlife:Catawba Brewing Company – Although this well-loved operation now has 2 outposts in Asheville, Morganton is where it all began. Their head facility and taproom are still located right in downtown on South Green St. Here you can find their classic line of canned beers of course, but also you can try some of their other excellent and unique offerings like the Mother Trucker Pale and Black Dome Stout.Fonta Flora Brewing – Only a couple of blocks away, this small regional brewery has been causing quite the buzz lately on the craft beer scene. Fonta offers visitors adventurous and delicious rustic ales and saisons while using as many local ingredients as possible.Brown Mountain Bottleworks – A newer community gathering spot. As a hybrid bottle shop, beer, and wine bar, and music venue, this is the kind of place that is perfect for an after-dinner hangout and nightcap.brownmtBrown Mountain Bottleworks: photo by John S. PayneLodging: A wide range of lodging options exist, including private and state park camping, lakeside cabins, and in-town hotels & inns. The Burke County TDA is the best clearinghouse of choices, but here are two different options on opposite ends of the spectrum:Camp Lake James – An exclusive lakeside community and adventure center that offers 2 unique cabins with all the amenities and privileges of the community.Steele Creek Park – A family campground complete with a camp store and a natural swimming beach with water slides and diving boards.Upcoming Events Not To Miss:State of Origin Craft Beer Festival: An extremely unique beer festival focusing on the flora and fauna of the state. All 23 of the participating North Carolina breweries are required to bring a beer that was brewed using ingredients grown in North Carolina. June 13 in the Courthouse SquareRed, White, and Bluegrass Festival: This much loved multi-day event is in its 12th year and features a holiday packed with some of the most acclaimed bluegrass acts in the business. A sampling of this year includes The Del McCoury Band, Blue Highway, Town Mountain, Seldom Scene, Balsam Range, Mountain Heart, and many more. July 1st–4th at Catawba Meadows Park.Native Knowledge:“Morganton is amazing because it is such a good jumping off point to access a plethora of outdoor activities. It offers something for almost all outdoor pursuits and those offerings are top of the class experiences.  Combine that with two amazing breweries a few blocks from each other and great grub and it is no wonder that most of my adventures begin and end here.”  – Brandon Thrower,  BRO trail running athlete and educator“Morganton combines all the comforts of a small mountain town with truly world-class outdoor opportunities and a unique cultural collision of various ethnic and social groups… it is the most fascinating place I’ve ever lived, and its appeal continues to grow every year I’m here.” Seth Hawkins, Owner of Hawk Ventures and Vertical Medicine ResourcesRelated:last_img read more

Easter cheer continues on in the City of Norwich

first_imgBut due to the coronavirus’ impact and mandates about large gatherings, the egg hunt was off the table for Easter 2020. CITY OF NORWICH, N.Y. (WBNG) — On previous Easter Sundays, the Norwich Fire Department typically hosts an Easter egg hunt for their community to get outside and enjoy. “You look around, and everyone has been doing their thing to help everybody,” Ford said. “First responders, they’re getting free food from the merchants, it’s a great thing.” The fire department’s Assistant Chief Patrick Ford teamed up with the Easter Bunny to drive all over town, waving to folks as they zipped by. Ford told 12 News he and the Easter Bunny were hoping to hit every street in the city.center_img However, that didn’t stop the department from spreading some Easter cheer. Ford was just happy to do his part for the community. For more coronavirus coverage, click here.last_img read more

Indonesia to test more people for COVID-19

first_imgThe Health Ministry has said it will now assign its regional labs to test people suspected of carrying the novel coronavirus amid concerns that it has not been proactive enough in detecting infected people to prevent its spread.The ministry, which is spearheading the battle against the lethal virus, previously insisted that only its Jakarta-based Health Research and Development Agency (Balitbangkes) be authorized to conduct throat swab tests and announce the result.The policy change was made after President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo announced on Monday that two Indonesians, known as Case 1 and Case 2, had been diagnosed with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The patients, a mother and her daughter, are believed to have contracted the virus after the latter interacted with a Japanese COVID-19 patient who visited Jakarta last month.“With the first confirmed cases, we need to be able to respond faster. The tests will no longer be done in Balitbangkes only,” said the Health Ministry’s disease control and prevention directorate general secretary, Achmad Yurianto, who has been appointed as the spokesman for the handling of the virus outbreak.Read also: COVID-19: ‘People don’t need to stockpile everyday items’, Jokowi says amid panic buying spreeEnvironmental, health and technology centers (BTKL) in 10 cities — Batam, Medan, Palembang, Makassar, Manado, Ambon, Jakarta, Yogyakarta, Surabaya and Banjarmasin — have been chosen to conduct the tests. The labs will only conduct a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, which is used to determine whether someone has contracted Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19, Achmad said. Only Balitbangkes, he added, had the capability to conduct a gene sequencing analysys to identify the virus infecting a suspected patient if they were declared negative for coronavirus.“We will send supervisors to these centers. Now a specimen from Ambon no longer needs to be sent to Jakarta,” Achmad said.Officials will now test not only those showing COVID-19 symptoms and having recently traveled to countries affected by the virus outbreak such as China, South Korea and Iran but also those having had contact with coronavirus-positive people even though they show no symptoms.Many parties, including scientists and foreign governments, have cited the lack of tests as the primary reason Indonesia, one of the top tourist destinations for people in Wuhan, the Chinese city from which the animal virus first infected humans, could have been underreporting cases.The government has only tested samples of 155 suspected patients across the country, two of which have come back positive. For comparison, as of March 2, South Korea, which has the most COVID-19 patients outside China, has performed 109,591 tests.While it has decided to change its testing policy, the government has refused to establish a special independent committee to handle the health crisis, as demanded by a number of health experts.“There is no need for a new organization. Too much structure is confusing,” Achmad said.Doubts linger over whether the Health Ministry alone is capable of handling the crisis, or is proactive enough to detect patients, which is crucial to prevent the virus from spreading.Critics have questioned whether the ministry had been proactive in tracing people who have had contact with foreign nationals who tested positive for coronavirus and are known to have traveled to Indonesia.Health Minister Terawan Agus Putranto initially claimed that the government had proactively traced Case 1, a 31-year-old woman, after being notified by Malaysia that a Japanese COVID-19 patient had visited Indonesia. He then clarified that it was the woman herself who came to the hospital to have herself checked after being informed by her friend about the Japanese woman.Achmad has dismissed such concerns, saying the government was now tracing 50 people of different nationalities who went to a restaurant where Case 1 met with the Japanese patient. “We’ve got three names. It’s not easy because the patient did not have a close relation to these people.”On Tuesday, President Jokowi called on the Indonesian people to remain calm and respect the COVID-19 patients’ privacy following his announcement of the first two confirmed cases of the disease.“The fact is that most of the patients — including those in China, Japan, Italy and Iran — have been able to recover from the disease. So we don’t have to fret but we should remain vigilant,” he said, adding that hospitals treating the patients should avoid disclosing their private information.Bayu Krisnamurthi, who headed the National Committee for Avian Flu Control and Pandemic Preparedness (Komnas Flu Burung), said the country must work together to contain the virus.“We are no longer preventing the novel coronavirus from entering the country. We should now focus on containing its spread. There must be a special authority to handle this,” Bayu told The Jakarta Post on Monday.The special committee will have the authority to coordinate between related institutions. “The core issue is national health, but that’s not the only one. It involves many things: transportation, industries, scientific institutions, regional administrations and more. We need to have an authority that is specifically assigned to this, working full time to handle this because coronavirus is not a usual thing,” he said. (aly)Editor’s note:The article has been updated to clarify Achmad Yurianto’s statement on the authority of Balitbangkes.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Only 70 flights of 79,000 prior to pandemic now operating in Indonesia: Sri Mulyani

first_imgThe COVID-19 pandemic has hit Indonesia’s aviation industry hard as domestic and international flight numbers have dropped significantly amid social restrictions and a slump in foreign tourist arrivals.Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati has said only 70 flights are still operating of a total of around 79,000 before the virus outbreak.“All the airlines are currently under immense pressure,” Sri Mulyani told House of Representatives Commission XI overseeing financial affairs in a virtual meeting on Monday. “The airline industry lost income of Rp 207 billion [US$13.65 million] between January and February alone.” She said 240,000 flights were canceled globally between Jan. 23 and Feb. 18, adding that 12,703 domestic and international flights in the country were canceled in the January-February period.The global airline industry is expected to lose up to $314 billion because of the pandemic, according to estimates by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), as people choose to stay at home.Read also: Explainer: What’s allowed and what’s not in Indonesia’s ‘mudik’ banStatistics Indonesia (BPS) data showed on Monday that domestic passenger traffic dropped 24 percent in March from the corresponding period last year.This was the fewest foreign tourist arrivals since February 2009 as the coronavirus pandemic led to a slump in travel demand in March.There were 470,900 foreign visitors in March, down 64.11 percent from the same month last year, with tourist numbers from both China and Hong Kong falling more than 96 percent.Foreign arrivals have continued to decline since January, with 1.27 million arrivals in that month, and only 864,000 tourist arrivals in February.Topics :last_img read more

When does the Premier League start? Opening day fixtures and which are on TV

first_imgWhen does the Premier League start? Opening day fixtures and which are on TV Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 9 Jul 2019 3:26 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link70Shares Manchester begin the defence of their title on Saturday 10 August (Picture: REUTERS)The Premier League season is right around the corner, with less than five weeks before the action starts all over again in England’s top flight.It has been a packed summer of football since the end of last season, with the Europa and Champions League finals, followed by the Women’s World Cup and Copa America, keeping football fans very busy.But attention is turning back to league action with Premier League fixtures beginning on Friday 9 August and five games being televised across the opening weekend as a whole.The highest profile clash of the opening weekend is the last fixture on the Sunday as Frank Lampard takes charge of Chelsea for the first time in the Premier League, away to Manchester United.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTOpening weekend FixturesFriday 9 August8pm Liverpool v Norwich CitySaturday 10 August12.30pm West Ham United v Manchester City3pm Bournemouth v Sheffield United3pm Burnley v Southampton3pm Crystal Palace v Everton3pm Leicester City v Wolverhampton3pm Watford v Brighton5.30pm Tottenham Hotspur v Aston VillaSunday 11 August2pm Newcastle United v Arsenal4.30pm Manchester United v ChelseaMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityOpening weekend televised fixturesFri 9 Aug – Liverpool v Norwich – Sky SportsSat 10 Aug – West Ham v Man City – BT SportSat 10 Aug – Tottenham v Aston Villa – Sky SportsSun 11 Aug – Newcastle v Arsenal – Sky SportsSun 11 Aug – Man Utd v Chelsea – Sky SportsMORE: Jurgen Klopp tells Liverpool’s players they have unfinished business in the Premier LeagueMORE: Bayern Munich chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge hints at move for Man City’s Leroy Sanecenter_img Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

BCEF honoring school employees through campaign

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. — The Batesville Community Education Foundation is sponsoring a “You’ve Made a Difference” spring campaign to honor Batesville Community School Corporation employees.As the end of the school year approaches, the foundation wants to recognize those individuals who are having a positive impact in the lives of Batesville Community School Corporation students.For a minimum donation of $10, any Batesville Schools employee – past or present – can be thanked for a job well done.The deadline is Friday, April 21 in order to have a sign with the employee’s name placed outside the school in early May during National Teacher Appreciation Week.Paper forms, which are available at every school building, can be mailed in, dropped off at the administration building, or returned to school.You can also donate online.last_img read more

Margaret Henson

first_imgMargaret J. Henson, 92, of Moores Hill passed away Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at her home. Margaret was born Wednesday, February 3, 1926 in Cincinnati, Ohio the daughter of Frank and Jane (Millward) Etzel.  She was a member of Christ Church in Cincinnati, a past member of the Milan Legion Auxiliary and worked for Dearborn County Hospital in central supplies department.  She enjoyed crocheting, baking cookies and candies for the military around Christmas, loved watching westerns and WWE on TV.Margaret is survived by son Raymond (Sharon) Rodmaker of Moores Hill, 7 grandchildren, many great grandchildren and 1 great great grandchild.  She was preceded in death by her parents, son Frank Rodmaker, daughter Sandy McFarland and brothers Frank and Tom Etzel.A service celebrating her life will be at 4 PM January 5, 2019 at Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home in Moores Hill.  Memorials may be given in her honor to the American Breast Cancer Society.  Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, 16717 Manchester Street, P.O. Box 156, Moores Hill, IN 47032, (812) 744-3280.  You may go to www.sibbettmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more