Pep rallies refocused on students

first_img A priority for the pep rallies should be bringing the team and the student body together before the game, Oliver said. Bell said pep rallies should to be a time for the students and the football team to share their enthusiasm about the upcoming game. The student body will help launch a new era of pep rallies when it marches down Notre Dame Avenue and into the Irish Green tonight in preparation for the Michigan game Saturday, student body president Catherine Soler said. Soler said the student walkover will begin at 5:45 p.m. from Main Circle. Seamon said Kelly was excited about the new attitude about pep rallies from the start of the discussions between the football team, Game Day Operations and the Athletics Department. Seamon said the walkover could be the “newest Notre Dame student tradition.” “We made sure pep rallies will have no lag time now,” Doyle said. “When the students arrive the pep rally will start.” The University will close Notre Dame Avenue for 15 minutes while the student body follows a procession consisting of the Notre Dame Security Police, the Notre Dame Fire Department, the cheerleading and pom squads, the leprechaun and the marching band into a designated student section next to the stage at Irish Green, Seamon said. “This is the year where students can prove which pep rally locations they like the most so we hope students embrace this chance,” Bell said. “It will be hard to persuade those involved in planning the pep rally to go to a certain location if there was not a huge student showing.” “We wanted to make students a bigger focus of the pep rallies,” Seamon said. “What a better way to do that than announce their arrival and have them march down the avenue into a huge reserved space for them?” Kelly will host each pep rally in order to deliver his message from the week of practice, and to take the entire team before the student body to introduce the captains to the fans, Seamon said. The first pep rallies of the year will be hosted in a number of different locations including Irish Green, the Purcell Pavilion and Stepan Center to test the benefits and drawbacks of different campus venues, Bell said. Seamon said 25 to 30 thousand fans are expected for the Michigan pep rally. “We were very pleased with the opportunity given to us by the athletic department in hearing our ideas for restructuring,” Bell said. “We appreciate their openness.” Soler and Bell approached Game Day Operations last spring to present the idea of a student walkover and to emphasize the need for more student-oriented pep rallies, Mike Seamon, director of Game Day Operations said. “We are trying to reinforce the relationship between students and the football program that makes Notre Dame so special,” Soler said. “Coach Kelly totally gets Notre Dame,” he said. “His enthusiasm is contagious, and it rubs off on everybody.” This year’s pep rallies will be “short but with high intensity and lots of spirit,” Soler said. “Residence halls have a huge role in the success of the pep rally because of the walkovers when they coordinate students going to the pep rallies,” Bell said. “The groups that are our biggest focus are the team and the student body,” Seamon said. “With a new coach and a new era starting, we thought it was a perfect time to reengage the student body.” “The morale and student perception of pep rallies last year was low and negative,” Soler said. “All of us in student government knew that pep rallies were an important part of life here and wanted to make that a priority this year.”  “When the team comes to the pep rally and see thousands of students there, they will be electrified,” Oliver said. “They will see how much the students are behind them.” Student government teamed up with the Athletic Department, Game Day Operations and Hall Presidents’ Council (HPC) to coordinate pep rally changes, Soler said. “We are very excited about the idea of the walkover,” Bell said. “It will eliminate dorms just standing around with a huge group of alumni waiting for the pep rally to start.” HPC co-chairs Alexa Doyle and Mike Oliver said the student body powers the football team’s spirit during the season. HPC arranged a competition for the most spirited residence hall during each pep rally. As an extra incentive, the winning hall will win a visit from head coach Brian Kelly.last_img read more

LIGHTS donates to high schools

first_imgUsed science equipment has found new life in needy high schools thanks to the year-old Notre Dame Laboratory Instrumentation Giving Hope to Students (ND LIGHTS) initiative. The program has successfully donated 12 pieces of campus equipment valued at more than $275,000 to six schools participating in the Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) program, ND LIGHTS Director Dr. Michelle Viglietta Joyce said. “This program has evolved into a place for a second life for equipment,” she said. “We take care of all of the paperwork. All the professor has to do is say, ‘I have this machine and want it to be donated.’ All the schools have to do is pay for the transportation … It’s a win-win for everyone.” The program finds high schools in need across the country and prepares the donation, Joyce said. “Everyone is very supportive of this project,” she said. “I’m so appreciative of the department, the dean of the College of Science and the Office of Sustainability. They helped me turn this idea into a reality.” The origin of ND LIGHTS lies in West Virginia, Joyce said. Joyce’s father, a retired principal at a West Virginia high school, spent 40 years encouraging students to grow and explore with education, she said. Joyce, an assistant professional specialist in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, took these teachings to heart when she founded ND LIGHTS last year to give old scientific equipment from Notre Dame science labs to resource-limited schools across the United States. “I always watched him provide the best for his students, especially in the sciences,” she said. “It was my high school chemistry lab that got me interested in chemistry. That’s where you can get kids interested in making this into a career.” Joyce creates experiments for teachers to perform with their students at the recipient schools. “What sets this program apart is the fact that we develop these experiments,” she said. “VWR, the preferred campus supplier of lab supplies, has partnered with us to donate all of the accessories and chemicals. They’re donating cases and cases so whole classes can do the experiment.” Joyce said she used journal articles to develop the experiments during the program’s first year, which she then taught to ACE teachers over the summer to use in their curriculum this fall. Next year, she will look to local schools as possible recipients for program equipment. In the future, Joyce said she hopes more Notre Dame students can get involved with the project. One way they can do so is enrolling in a class this spring semester to assist with donations. The class, called “Instrumentation in Scientific Education,” will have two to three students working with the equipment to create experiments for high school classes. Beyond the instruments donated to needy high schools, four highly specialized machines were also donated to Saint Mary’s, Joyce said. The machines are already being used in Saint Mary’s science curriculum. Contact Joyce at [email protected] if you would like to donate or learn more about the spring semester class.last_img read more

Inn at Saint Mary’s holds student photography contest

first_imgPhotography by three Saint Mary’s seniors will decorate the walls of the Inn at Saint Mary’s even after they graduate from the College on Saturday. Seniors Julie McGrail, Elizabeth Munger and Guadalupe Quintana are the winners of a photography contest hosted by the Inn, and their work will decorate the walls of its guest rooms. The Inn at Saint Mary’s was renovating 11 guest rooms last fall when one of its owners decided to replace the existing photos with new images, general manager Kim Kudelka said. The contest opened in December. The owners of The Inn selected the three students’ photographs from over 150 photos submitted to the contest. The Inn announced the contest winners in March. “At The Inn, we felt that we needed to get back our strong relationship with the College,” Kim Kudelka said. “I have been working here for 10 years, and we all thought it was time to rebuild the relationship. This photo contest was a great way for us to begin.” The new photos capture scenes from the College campus, she said. “The old photos were pretty conservative and dated,” Kudelka said. “The ones that we have chosen bring light to the new rooms, and add more of the Saint Mary’s charm to each room.” Munger said she had already taken pictures of campus when she received the email about entering the photo contest. “My dad takes pictures, and I was given a big, professional camera for my high school graduation, so I also really enjoy taking pictures,” Munger said. “When I received the email, I already knew which pictures I wanted to send in.” Munger’s chosen photo, titled “Reflection on Lake Marian,” depicts Haggar Hall reflected on the lake on the Saint Mary’s campus. During a walk from Notre Dame to Saint Mary’s campus, Quintana said she decided to take a snapshot of the trees lining the Avenue. “I just happened to have my camera, a small digital one, and saw a perfect picture to capture of the fall leaves and trees,” Quintana said. “My photo is titled, ‘A Belle’s Walk Home.’” McGrail said she had a folder of photos taken on a walk from Saint Mary’s to Notre Dame last spring. “I sent in about five different pictures, and two of them were chosen to be displayed,” McGrail said. “They are titled ‘Spring at Lake Marian’ and ‘Spring at the Grotto.’” The seniors said they were all equally surprised to find out they won the contest. “I was excited because the Inn is so pretty and so many people stay there when they are in town,” Munger said. Quintana said she was surprised the Inn chose her photo out of from 150 submissions. “This was really nice because I am a senior and it is something that I can leave behind at Saint Mary’s,” Quintana said. The Inn honored the winners in April for their achievement. “There was a reception held at The Inn for each of the winners where we were able to see our photos blown up, framed and hanging up in the renovated rooms,” McGrail said. “There is a suite that holds all of the photos that won the contest. It was really amazing to see our work hanging up at The Inn.” So far, the Inn has received tremendous feedback on the new rooms with the new photographs, Kudelka said. “We plan on holding another contest for more photos to be displayed in more renovated rooms,” Kudelka said. “We really want the relationship between The Inn and the College to get back to the way it was.” As they prepare for Commencement on Saturday, the three seniors said they were glad to leave a lasting mark on Saint Mary’s. “This contest was such a great way to have a student’s perspective of their home they have lived in for the past four years,” McGrail said. “It is truly a wonderful collaboration.”last_img read more

College obtains science grant

first_imgOver a dozen science, engineering and math students from Saint Mary’s will receive additional financial and academic support as the result of a grant recently awarded to the College. Chemistry professor Toni Barstis and math professor Joanne Snow served as co-principal investigators of the grant, awarded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Biology professor Ryan Dombkowski is the faculty principal investigator of the grant and also served as co-author. The grant will begin distribution to eligible students starting in the 2013-14 school year. The grant awards $600,000 to Saint Mary’s to sponsor the advancement of women in engineering, math and science. The grant is through the NSF PRISM Women Scholars Program and provides scholarships for up to 20 students. The grant will provide roughly $26,500 of support to each student. Distribution of funds is spread throughout their sophomore, junior and senior years. “[The scholarships] are wonderful opportunities for Saint Mary’s to provide financial and developmental support to women interested in ‘STEM’ [Science, Technology, Engineering and Math] field,” Dombkowski said. The school will award the scholarships to students based on their high school and first semester grades, along with recommendations from first-year professors and advisors. In addition to academia and references, Dombkowski said scholarship recipients must demonstrate an “exceptional motivation and enthusiasm for STEM disciplines.” “In the end, we want to see our students go off into successful and exciting careers in STEM fields and this scholarship program should provide us with support to do that at a higher level,” Dombkowski said. Once a student is given a scholarship, she will have to complete a list of requirements as part of her award, Drombkowski said. The student will have to participate in some community outreach, such as math or science tutoring at local schools, partake in some on-campus educational events and various field trips to pharmaceutical companies, research labs and other STEM places, he said. The scholarship recipient will also have to apply for summer research opportunities and as seniors, will attend a national conference where they will present their research from the summer or their senior comps, Drombkowski said. Dombkowski said  being awarded the grant is an accomplishment itself because of the number of applications the NSF receives every year. “I want to say that the NSF is only funding about 6 to 8 percent of their current grant applications, which means Saint Mary’s has been awarded this opportunity amongst a lot of competition,” he said. “We are certainly honored to be recognized by the NSF and excited to get started.” Dombkowksi said the College science and math departments have high hopes for the grant and are eager to see the impact of it on students, school and community. “I think that I can speak for my other [co-principle investigators] when I say that we hope the grant will help us to advertise the wonderful work Saint Mary’s women all already doing in STEM fields; to promote STEM careers and research for Saint Mary’s students; to attract, interest and retain the best and brightest students towards the STEM disciplines and to financially support exceptionally motivated STEM students throughout their studies,” he said. Contact Bridget Feeney at [email protected]last_img read more

ND ranks fifth in study abroad participation

first_imgThe opportunity to spend a semester of college taking classes in a foreign country, visiting new places and forming strong relationships with other students to many seems too good to pass up, and Notre Dame students are taking advantage of study abroad opportunities at higher rates than ever before. According to the Open Doors report released by the Institute of International Education (IIE), Notre Dame ranks fifth nationwide in percentage of undergraduate students participating in study abroad programs among U.S. doctoral and research institutions. The story focused on the 2011 to 2012 academic year. The United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, France and China ranked as the top five destinations for American students, and the IIE reported a steady increase in students pursuing academic semesters in foreign countries over the past decade. According to the report, 65.9 percent of Notre Dame students participate in study abroad, a 6.2 percent increase from 2012. Last year, the University ranked ninth in the survey. The Notre Dame International website states that the mission of International Studies is “to enable international learning and research experiences that enhance the academic, intercultural and spiritual formation of our students; enrich their global and cultural awareness and help to develop engaged citizens in our increasingly interconnected and interdependent world.” Junior Kate Friedli said she chose to study abroad in the United Kingdom during the past summer for a variety of reasons. “I think more and more people are going abroad for two reasons,” she said. “First, it’s incredibly fun. Second, you have the opportunity to learn things you wouldn’t in a normal, domestic class.” Friedli said her favorite part of the experience was forming friendships with the other Notre Dame students in her program. “What I found most rewarding about studying abroad was the people,” Friedli said. “The people from Notre Dame who I went abroad to London with will be my lifelong friends, and my interactions with true Londoners were very rewarding and fun.” Junior Sara Reyes also said studying abroad offered an opportunity to branch out and meet Notre Dame students she has yet to interact with on campus. “Studying abroad is the perfect medium to get out of your comfort zone,” Reyes said. “It was a great experience for me because I met a lot of Notre Dame students that I may never have had the pleasure of being friends with had I not met them during my time abroad.” Junior Katharine Maheras said she valued the opportunity to experience new cultures with other Notre Dame students who share a similar background to hers. “I not only got to have a new cultural experience but also was able to strengthen friendships with Notre Dame students through doing so,” Maheras said. Junior Kevin McMannis said by offering study abroad programs over the summer, Notre Dame International allows even more students to take advantage of the opportunity to study in a foreign country. “The summer abroad let me experience new and different parts of my Notre Dame and college career without missing a semester on this amazing campus,” he said. “I got to branch out of my dorm, live with six guys I didn’t know before and meet other amazing people.” Living in a metropolitan city and absorbing the culture were highlights of the summer program, McMannis said. “London’s city life and culture was one of the most amazing experiences I’ve had so far, and I am super blessed to have been able to spend it with my college friends, new and old,” he said.  Notre Dame boasts more than 40 international study programs in more than 20 nations, including Australia, Brazil, Chile, China, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, Russia, Senegal, South Korea, Singapore, Switzerland, Uganda and the U.K., along with a domestic program in Washington, D.C. Contact Meg Handelman at [email protected]last_img read more

SMC hosts foreign language celebration

first_imgSaint Mary’s students shared in the native languages of six women from five different countries Monday through “Writing Across the World,” an event sponsored by the Saint Mary’s English Language School. At the event, which also marked the beginning of International Week, the women translated and transcribed students’ names into their native languages. She designed the event to promote dialogue – in English or otherwise –  between students, Terra Cowham, assistant director for International Student Scholar Services at the English Language School, said.  “During International Week, we want to highlight all the diversity in the international students on our campus,” Cowham said. “We thought it’d be really awesome if they wrote some themes or sayings while sharing their native language with us.”  “This event begins a cultural festival,” Ethiopian student Neima Mohammed said. Mohammed’s ability to speak English fluently is a result of five months of language classes from Saint Mary’s, she said. The Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership offers a rigorous program in the English Language School to non-native speakers, and Cowham said the four-week program is open to anyone. “We have a program for anyone, [from] adult women [to] students just out of high school, if they want to come and learn English they come here, live on campus and they take classes that are non-degree but focused on learning the English language,” she said. Cowham said many women come for additional practice or instruction before they enter another college. “I am extremely passionate about making students global citizens and connecting the world every day,” Cowham said. “I want to help all of campus see what wonderful resources we have, all the wonderful students that come here from across the world.” Noemy Siles-Alvarado, a Costa Rican student, said she feels the strong sense of community that Cowham has tried to foster for international students at Saint Mary’s. “The professors are really, really good. All the girls are friendly,” she said. “I have enjoyed it, it feels like family.” Siles-Alvarado said she found her role at the writing event amusing. “It’s interesting for me because I’m from Costa Rica. It’s not that amazing and for most people it’s the same name in English as it is in Spanish,” she said. “For the other girls, I think it’s really cool because they can write in their own language.” Siles-Alvarado said she chose to attend the English Language School to improve her grammar before she begins pursuing a pre-medicine degree at Goshen College. Maha Alshahrani, a student from Saudi Arabia, said she chose Saint Mary’s to study among pupils of her own gender and aspires to receive a Master’s degree from Notre Dame. Mayumi Oda and Misa Inaba are both studying abroad from the same college in Japan, which Inaba said was “kind of a sister school to Saint Mary’s.” This semester they live with two American roommates in Le Mans Hall. Oda said as much as they miss home now, when they leave they will miss Saint Mary’s as well. “It’s beautiful to communicate with another country’s people,” Oda said. Contact Rebecca O’Neil at [email protected]last_img read more

Saint Mary’s student panel discusses mental health

first_imgA panel of Saint Mary’s students shared their experiences with mental illness Monday as part of the College’s Support a Belle, Love a Belle (SABLAB) week.Sophomore Alicia Twisselmann started off the panel talking about about her struggle with anxiety and depression. She said the combination of her anxiety and depression with attention deficit disorder (ADD) makes it difficult for her to stay motivated.Chris Collins | The Observer “I have such high goals and aspirations, and I’m a perfectionist,” she said.“Yet at the same time, I still can’t quite bring myself to do what I know I need to.” She said she has been affected by her mental illnesses for as long as she can remember, and was first put on medication in second grade. “I’m thankful that at this point it’s just sort of at the background, but it still definitely continues to have an impact,” she said.Twisselmann said small acts of kindness matter the most to her and will help encourage her to open up to others about how she’s feeling.  Chris Collins | The Observer Sophomore Meredith Mackowicz spoke about her experience living with generalized anxiety disorder and clinical depression. She said while she was able to self-diagnose her mental disorders, she finally opened up to a doctor two summers ago.“I feel like there’s such a stigma, especially on college campuses, about mental illnesses. And while it is a part of me, it’s not the biggest part of me and it’s not the most important part of me,” Mackowicz said. “There’s so many other things that I take pride in like music and theatre and art and there’s so many aspects to a person.”Mackowicz said once she was able to open up about her mental illness, she found other students on campus who had the same issues and background as her.“I think the best way to beat the stigma is to just not worry about it and to realize some people are going to have issues that you won’t understand and that they can’t explain to you,” she said. “I think we just have to be patient, we have to be open to people and realize that if you just do one small thing you can make a complete difference in someone else’s life.”Sophomore Ashley Coates opened up about her struggle with anxiety and clinical depression. She said she knew there was a problem when she would wake up anxious and unable to get out of bed.“Although it is 100 percent mental — as in it’s [your head] that’s making you feel that way — it does affect your body physically,” Coates said. “For example, if I become anxious, I can’t eat.” Coates said while there are difficult patches, she was able to get a better grasp on her mental illnesses with the help of the Saint Mary’s psychiatrist.“There’s an end,” she said. “There’s a point where it stops where you’re okay again, and you’ll be okay. I just want everyone to know that there is that point — whether you’re dealing with anxiety or dealing with depression or whatever you’re dealing with — there is a point where you will be okay again and that’s where I’m trying to be.”Junior Taylor Thomas shared her struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Thomas said she is a perfectionist and had difficulty opening up about the side effects of her mental illnesses with others.“I did really well in school freshman year and then things started going downhill, especially my sophomore year,” she said. “I didn’t care about tests, I didn’t care about anything, I didn’t even want to get out of bed most days. It was really rough.”Thomas said Saint Mary’s staff and faculty have been supportive and helpful on her journey towards learning to cope with PTSD and depression.“It has been rough, it has not been easy at all,” Thomas said. “So if you’re going into therapy thinking one session is it — no. It’s going to be a long haul, and I’m still dealing with it today.”Junior Alyssa Richards spoke about her struggles with depression. She said her depression comes and goes, but is manageable now.“It got to the point where I felt like a zombie just watching myself go through my day-to-day tasks,” she said. “I lost interest in things that were really important to me.”Richards said she has been able to find peace and solace in nature. “I am a very strong-minded person, even though I do have depression, so I was determined to find out the things that make me happy,” she said. “I’m doing a lot better, and I’ve figured out how to deal with it on my own.”Mackowicz said seeking help is important even if someone is unsure if they have a diagnosable disorder.“Disorders manifest themselves in many different ways and in many different forms, and I think it’s important to know that because if you think you might have one aspect of a disorder that’s okay,” Mackowicz said. “It’s still good to get help, it’s still good to talk to somebody about that one aspect.”Tags: Mental health, SABLAB, support a belle love a bellelast_img read more

Saint Mary’s students reflect on Semester at Sea

first_imgSaint Mary’s seniors Madison Marshall and Clare Theisen, along with junior Maura Newell, made waves when they participated in the Semester at Sea program, which is not directly offered through Saint Mary’s, but which the students managed to incorporate into their experiences at the College.Semester at Sea is a 100-day program that allows students to experience the cultures of ten or more countries in only one semester of school. Students travel on a boat that is slightly smaller than a cruise ship to get from international destination to destination — the destinations change slightly each semester. Newell, who studied abroad last semester, said she attended classes with fellow students from around the world while on the boat. “We would have class every day we were at sea, so we didn’t really didn’t have weekends,” she said. “The longest we were sailing was 12 days when we went from Hawaii to Japan, and the shortest was two days when we went from Japan to China.”Newell said as long as students discuss their plans to study abroad with the Registrar Office, their classes can count toward Saint Mary’s credits. Classes cover a range of topics, such as economics, art history, world diplomacy, photography, literature, anthropology, oceanography and religion, she said.“When we’re on the ship, we study what country we’re going to,” she said. “So in my business economics class, we would talk about the economy of whichever country we were traveling to.”Students have the option to either pay extra to take classes once the boat docks in a country or to travel independently. However, even if the students opt to travel independently, they must attend at least one field lab while they’re visiting a country. Newell said her art history class met with an artist in Vietnam. Professors, like students, must also apply to teach for a semester on the ship. Marshall, a marketing major who studied abroad in the fall of 2015, said most of the professors were from the U.S., but some were from other countries. “All of the professors were from prestigious schools,” she said. “I had professors from Yale and Harvard, which is something I wouldn’t be able to experience anywhere else.”Newell said the community feeling on the ship was unique because of how close the students live to the faculty.“When you’re living in close quarters with everyone, you get to know everyone really well,”  Newell said. “You don’t just see your teachers in a professional setting. You see them all over the ship, even walking down the hall in their PJs.”The ship was equipped with a gym, pool, a theater where students could attend talks or performances and multiple dining halls. Marshall said the ship was similar to the one in the movie Titanic.“We were lucky that our boat was a new boat,” Marshall said. “It had a Titanic vibe. Everything was elegant and decorative and kind of old-fashioned.”The ship also had no phone service and no internet for the students. Theisen, who studied abroad with Marshall, said this aspect of the ship made the experience more authentic.“Because you couldn’t rely on your phone, you were forced to listen and learn.” Theisen said. “When we went abroad, it was around the time of the Paris attacks, so it was interesting to see people’s perspectives from around the world. I grew and learned so much from the people around me.”Marshall said she made some of her best friends on the ship. “The relationships I made with other students on the ship aren’t even comparable with any of my other relationships,” Marshall said. “You build this inseparable bond with the people you travel with, even though they start out to be complete strangers.”Newell was the only Saint Mary’s student on her voyage, but she said it was worth pushing herself outside of her comfort zone for the experience. One of the greatest experiences she had was on her trip to Myanmar, she said. “We took a hot air balloon and flew over a bunch of pagodas and temples at sunrise,” Newell said. “I went to a little town that most tourists don’t go to. We met a family while we were there, and we stayed with them over night. It was such a different experience.”Students are able to travel to places such as the United Kingdom, Italy, Croatia, Greece, Spain, Morocco, Senegal, Brazil, Panama, Costa Rica, Japan, Hawaii, Vietnam, Burma, India, Malaysia and Myanmar, Marshall said.Marshall said one of the highlights from her trip was riding on camels in the Sahara Desert and sleeping in hammocks on the Amazon River. “Semester at Sea offers you the option to explore so many different places,” Marshall said. “I would have never chosen to go to Senegal, but that was probably one of my favorite places to go to. Every country was so amazing.” Theisen said one of the biggest advantages of studying abroad on the ship was the personal growth it offered.“It was a huge learning experience,” Theisen said. “In some places, you were surrounded by poverty, and a lot of people chose not to get off the ship. “There were times when people would swarm you begging for money, and I had never experienced anything like that. Those situations can be uncomfortable, but that’s when you grow.”Marshall said she would recommend Semester at Sea to anyone. “It pushes you to go outside of your comfort zone by spending time on a boat with a bunch of strangers and traveling to different parts of the world I could have never imagined going to,” Marshall said. “It has definitely helped to shape me into the better person I am today.”Tags: center for women’s intercultural leadership, semester at sea, study abroadlast_img read more

Hunger Banquet depicts economic diversity, food security

first_imgParticipants at Saint Mary’s Hunger Banquet on Tuesday quickly discovered they were not eating a typical dinner. The event separated students, faculty and staff into one of three different groups representing social classes: upper, middle and lower. The lower economic classes had the largest number of participants, while the upper class was small. Participants sat and ate with their assigned class, and their class determined how much and what they ate.The upper class participants received a full, three-course meal served to them by staff while sitting at elaborately decorated tables. Meanwhile, middle class participants ate rice and lentils, and lower class participants only ate rice. This dinner simulated the differences between how and what different classes eat.Senior Olivia Burnett said the experience was eye-opening.“Most people eat to survive, whereas in our culture, we eat for pleasure,” she said.The Student Diversity Board (SDB) hosted the dinner with help from the Office of Civic and Social Engagement.SDB’s goal was to show how diverse America is in terms of economic status and that not everyone has the same resources students are accustomed to, senior and SDB President Victoria Ernsberger said.“The first year I went [to the banquet], it was truly an eye-opening experience to me, and the statistics provided during the event were heart-wrenching,” she said. “I think that it is important to understand that we are so privileged at Saint Mary’s. It is important to help those who are less fortunate.”Throughout the meal, participants heard testimonies about poverty and watched a video about food security in the United States. Ernsberger said 805 million people worldwide suffer from chronic hunger and about half of the world’s population, or 3 billion people, live in poverty.Burnett said the event highlighted the privilege of food security.“We don’t always recognize or appreciate that there are others out there who do not get the same privilege,” she said.The event is largely shaped by the participants and their personal experiences with food security, Ernsberger said.“Each year is different due to the individuals that partake in the event and their own individual stories and feelings that they are willing to share,” she said before the banquet. “We encourage participants to share their feelings regarding their placement during the banquet.” This year’s Hunger Banquet is part of a series of events geared towards food justice. Other events include a canned food drive, a campus ministry cooking class and a panel discussing food access. Ernsberger said she believes all of these events can help College community members be better informed about poverty and access.“I hope that students, faculty, and staff are able to walk away from the event feeling called to act and help with this injustice,” Ernsberger said. Tags: food insecurity, food justice week, hunger banquet, saint mary’s, Student Diversity Boardlast_img read more

NDSP arrests two men with guns near campus

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) arrested two men in possession of “two loaded handguns” near campus Wednesday evening, the University announced in a press release Friday. Troyon Scott, 18, and his brother Troyae, 20, both South Bend residents, were arrested while driving a silver Pontiac G6 that matched the description of an automobile involved in a previous incident, the release said. The two were charged with possession of weapons and possession of marijuana. Troyon Scott was also charged for driving a vehicle without a license. The handguns, which were Glock 19 and Glock 45 semi-automatic pistols, were found under the car seats and had “fully-loaded magazines of 17 rounds and 10 rounds, respectively,” the release said.Officer Jim Buchmann of NDSP led the arrest in response to a report he heard while monitoring the South Bend Police Department’s radio traffic, the release said. A woman had called the police to report a vehicle stopped on a bridge on Angela Boulevard.“The passer-by tapped on the driver’s side window, prompting the driver to speed away, eastbound toward the Notre Dame campus,” the release said. “The vehicle passed Buchmann at Angela Boulevard and Notre Dame Avenue, changing lanes near Eddy Street without a turn signal being employed.”Buchmann apprehended the Scotts near Edison Road and Harrington Drive with the help of Officer Tim Reiter and Lt. Andre Bridges. The brothers were taken to NDSP headquarters in Hammes Mowbray Hall “without incident” and were subsequently taken into custody by the South Bend Police Strategic Focus Unit, the release said.An investigation by local and federal police is ongoing.Tags: Arrest, guns, NDSP, Notre Dame Security Policelast_img read more