More change as Scotland name summer tour squad

first_imgSaturday 15 June v South Africa, Mbombela Stadium, Nelspruit, kick-off 4.15pmSaturday 22 June (final match to decide placings), Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria, time TBA All dark horse: Is it Blackadder over McKenzie for Scotland?So a forwards coach is opted for before a head coach, who comes in after the DOR climbs up the ladder and away from an exhausting tour. Perhaps there have been negotiations between the three men for some time, but letting the public know in this way makes it complicated to comprehend.Nevertheless, by asserting that they know their head coach but are waiting bring suggestions that it is someone currently in the club game. The season is already over for Sale Sharks so it is unlikely that an announcement around Bryan Redpath would require sitting on the hands and with Sharks unwilling to terminate his contract because of its length it is unlikely Scotland would be willing to buy him out.The chatter, then, has tended towards pushing Ewen McKenzie of the Queensland Reds to the front of the queue. However, reports from down under suggest that McKenzie has distanced himself from the job. At the same time, rumours are circulating that Canterbury Crusaders head Todd Blackadder – formerly an Edinburgh Gunner – is the hot favourite to take the job.It is a waiting game now, but with the way Scotland are flitting and fixing, improving and announcing it could be an exciting summer and beyond for those backing blue.Scotland squad for quadrangular tournament with South Africa, Samoa and Italy next month:Backs: Alex Dunbar (Glasgow Warriors), Tom Heathcote (Bath Rugby), Peter Horne, Ruaridh Jackson (both Glasgow Warriors), Greig Laidlaw (Edinburgh Rugby), Sean Lamont, Peter Murchie, Henry Pyrgos (all Glasgow Warriors), Matt Scott (Edinburgh Rugby), Tommy Seymour (Glasgow Warriors), Duncan Taylor* (Saracens), Greig Tonks and Tim Visser (both Edinburgh Rugby)Forwards: John Barclay (Glasgow Warriors), Johnnie Beattie (Montpellier), Kelly Brown (Saracens) capt., Geoff Cross, David Denton (both Edinburgh Rugby), Alasdair Dickinson (Sale Sharks), Ross Ford, Grant Gilchrist (both Edinburgh Rugby), Ryan Grant (Glasgow Warriors), Jim Hamilton (Gloucester Rugby), Alastair Kellock (Glasgow Warriors), Steven Lawrie (Edinburgh Rugby), Moray Low, Pat MacArthur (both Glasgow Warriors), Euan Murray (Worcester Warriors), Alasdair Strokosch (Perpignan), Tim Swinson and Ryan Wilson (both Glasgow Warriors).Matches: Saturday 8 June v Samoa, King’s Park, Durban, kick-off 1.15pm LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND – MAY 06: Reds coach Ewen Mckenzie (L) and Crusaders coach Todd Blackadder prior to the start of the round 11 Super Rugby match between the Crusaders and the Reds at AMI Stadium on May 6, 2012 in Christchurch, New Zealand. (Photo by Martin Hunter/Getty Images) All in his head: Scott Johnson is orchestrating Scotland’s exciting, unpredictable changes but who is his Head Coach?By Alan DymockCHANGE IS coming, or so it would seem north of the border as Scotland today named nine uncapped players for their quadrangular tournament this summer in South Africa against their hosts, Italy and Samoa.Those nine amongst the 31 are Edinburgh’s Steven Lawrie and Greig Tonks, the full-back who was so impressive in Scotland A’s defeat of England Saxons earlier in the season, Glagow’s Pat MacArthur, Tim Swinson, Alex Dunbar, Peter Horne, Peter Murchie and Tommy Seymour, and Saracens winger Duncan Taylor.Reliable: Greig Tonks impressed against the England SaxonsThe announcement comes hot on the heels the SRU announcment that Scott Johnson would become Director of Rugby at Murrayfield after the summer tour was over and a new head coach was announced. He would still be the man making all the decisions in South Africa, where the squad will arrive on May 31.“First up, it’s a strong squad designed to win Test matches against quality opposition,” the coach-cum-director said. “We’ve continued to monitor the players’ form closely and we’ve been pleased that Glasgow have reached the knockout stages of the Rabo.“We are taking the opportunity to have a look at some players and want to assess what they’re like at this level. We need to be able to find out whether players who’ve done the business for their clubs can replicate that form in international footy.”With international footy, however, there is always lots of distraction and plenty to look at when changes come. So while there has been plenty of news coming out of Scotland, banging out like the drummers on Murrayfield’s roof, it has all come in a disorderly fashion.Before it was made official that Johnson would stay on and move closer to the boardroom, Scotland contracted highly rated and hard-edged Ospreys coach Jonathan Humphreys for two years to coach their forwards. Now after the DOR and forwards coach are in place for the summer tour it is announced that the search for a new Head Coach has been concluded but that no further information will become available until some time has passed.The need to let the public in on good news is admirable, but by trying to generate positive momentum the Scots have let slip something about their workings.They have shown themselves eager to make moves before the ink has dried on their paperwork, a trait that has got them and young players like Steve Shingler in trouble before. They have also shown that they are happy to talk to fans while money may still be haggled over.last_img read more

George Ford and Owen Farrell: The story so far

first_imgEngland U18 coach John Fletcher brought George Ford and Owen Farrell through the age-groups, and now he believes they can thrive alongside one another… Midfield mates: Owen Farrell and George Ford during their England Under 18 days in South Africa LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Regardless of five Test defeats in a row and whatever has appeared in this week’s newspapers, English rugby is in rude health. An exacting talent identification system and a cohesive, connected representative ladder mean that will not change anytime soon. Consecutive Junior World Championship victories have not come by accident.Valuable: John Fletcher oversees England U18In that respect, John Fletcher is one of Twickenham’s most valuable assets. For six years he has overseen England U18 sides that play with pace, structure and eye-catching innovation. His list of alumni is already long and illustrious and each graduate raves about the contribution of ‘Fletch’ to their burgeoning careers.But when the chirpy, cheerful Geordie left the director of rugby position at Newcastle Falcons back in 2008, the first assignment of his current post was picking a squad for a tricky July tour to Argentina.Alongside more established players in their late teens such as Joe Marler and Freddie Burns, two northern lads had impressed over a successful spring with the U16 set-up.George Ford was 15 and Owen Farrell was 16. One was a diminutive fly half with exemplary distribution skills and enough vision to jump three years out of his age group. The other was a strapping centre whose prickly tenacity and measured maturity made him capable of playing two years up.Fletcher did not need a second thought and his inkling was immediately vindicated. He observed the strikingly assertive manner of two tyros as their close friendship translated into an exceptional on-field partnership.“They were dominating International U16 games,” he remembers. “They were head and shoulders above anything else on the pitch.Ruling the school: a midfield wrap-around sets up a try for England U16 v Millfield in 2008“What stood out with them was not just their skills but their attitude. They were far beyond their years from an emotional and cognitive point of view. Mentally, they were both so strong.“They spent a lot of time together socially, so they were confident in one another and understood each other – what they liked, what they didn’t like, what motivated them and what annoyed them. That’s a massive part of playing together.”Following an assured showing together against Uruguay on that trip, Farrell and Ford were mainstays of the next season for England U18 and cut a swathe through opponents while commanding a backline including Manu Tuilagi, Christian Wade and current sevens star Marcus Watson.Fletcher is an affable character who is enthusiastic without ever straying over the border into hyperbole. Even so, he does not bother trying single out one moment that sticks in his memory. By his reckoning,  Ford and Farrell would create danger “pretty much every time they touched the ball.”Original combo: Wade crosses for England Under 18 during the 63-0 defeat of Scotland in 2009A decade and a half guiding glittering talent will leave you with fairly accurate instincts in terms of gauging potential. Fletcher worked with Jonny Wilkinson and Toby Flood before joining the RFU, and admits that he often weighs up the respective qualities of past and present charges – including Henry Slade and prodigious Gloucester 17-year-old Mathew Protheroe. TAGS: Highlight Reunited: Ford and Farrell will start v SamoaInterestingly, given what Stuart Lancaster has decided to do this weekend, Ford and Farrell’s complementary combination stands out among Fletcher’s graduates. Both fine players in their own right, they always added up to more than the considerable sum of their parts.“As a pair, their collective awareness was outstanding,” Fletcher continues. “That was anticipation, decision-making and everything that is vital for a team to perform. People wrap those things up in the concept of ‘experience’.“I’ve reviewed games with George and Faz – they see and called things at the same time. They’re not telepathic, but they’re getting that way. It’s about reading body language and knowing what people think, and it’s massively important because it creates time on the ball and creates opportunities.Double trouble: Farrell & Ford combine again in the same game v Scotland“That can take time to develop, but those two just have it. It’s an absolute joy to coach. In fact, you’re not really coaching when those two are charging around – you’re just a facilitator.”Rob Hunter’s England U20 travelled to Italy for the 2011 Junior World Championship saturated with ability, from brawny, athletic forwards such as skipper Matt Kvesic and Joe Launchbury to an electric back division featuring Elliot Daly and Marland Yarde.Kick clever: Farrell sets up another try for Wade in the 2011 JWC semi-final victory over FranceEventually they were beaten 33-22 in the final by the Baby Blacks, who numbered Charles Piutau, Brodie Retallick and Beauden Barrett among an awesome crop. Throughout the tournament, Ford and Farrell directed proceedings. Fletcher watched on, and is now “incredibly excited” to see what a first senior start against Samoa will bring.Despite Farrell’s rather off-colour outing during the 31-28 loss to South Africa on Saturday, he is clearly confident of the pair posing problems in attack as well.“Owen will get in at first receiver a lot of times during the game, which allows George to go somewhere else. Something that people didn’t realise about Jonny Wilkinson was that his timing as a runner was as good as I’ve ever coached. A lot of times he’d get into scoring positions and nobody would be good enough to pass him the ball.“What you will see when these two are together is both of them threatening. They both recognise things as runners – lazy defenders, players not moving very well, guys shooting out of the system.“There was an inevitability about this happening, really. I know for a fact that Stuart has thought about the possibility of this combination for some time. It’s a good decision.” How do you think Ford & Farrell will get on v Samoa? Tell us by tweeting @Rugbyworldmag or posting on our Facebook wall – Rugby World Magazine.last_img read more

Video: Syrian Anglican priest urges dialogue for peace

first_img February 16, 2012 at 12:05 pm I met this priest when he visited a parish in Washington, DC. I believe he is the kind of person who could succeed in opening dialogue to avert continued bloodshed and violence. His group, the Awareness Foundation, is supported by St. Paul’s Parish K Street in DC, among others. Jenny Brake says: [Episcopal News Service] Syria has for the past 11 months been embroiled in a civil conflict in which President Bashar al-Assad and his supporters have responded with violence and bloodshed to protestors calling for an end to his leadership.In recent weeks the crackdown has escalated in many of Syria’s major cities. U.N. and human rights groups have estimated that the Syrian Army has killed at least 6,000 protesters since the start of the uprising in March 2011.China and Russia vetoed a Feb. 4 U.N. Security Council Resolution that would have called for Assad to step down. Before the vote, President Barack Obama denounced Assad’s “unspeakable assault,” demanded that he leave power immediately, and called for U.N. action against his “relentless brutality.”The Rev. Nadim Nassar, a Syrian Anglican priest who lives in London and is a member of the Church of England, speaks with ENS about the need for dialogue between the current regime and its opponents for there to be any hope of a peaceful resolution. Nassar is director of the London-based Awareness Foundation, an ecumenical initiative founded in 2003 in response to religious conflict and violence around the world and to educate about peaceful coexistence in pluralistic societies. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Video TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Greg Capaldini says: Nadim Nassar says: Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK February 25, 2012 at 7:15 pm Thank you so much for all your support, encouragement and love. I am deeply touched with your words. God bless you.Nadim Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group February 27, 2012 at 8:39 am Dear Nadim, i too have you in my prayers and heart. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN February 20, 2012 at 6:45 pm Nadim — you have been so much on my mind and in my prayers these last weeks. Every day the news seems worse, though I know we’re not getting the full story that you must have. I’ve been listening constantly for mention of Latakia. Didn’t know you had family also in Aleppo. But of course know you have dear friends across the country. You helped me understand that it’s so much more complicated than I’d realized as an American who didn’t comprehend the complex role religion plays in all of this. Praying for courage, for safety, for the kind of true dialogue for which you’re calling. If only our churches would foster this kind of deep listening and dialogue EVERYwhere! Proof that efforts like your Awareness Foundation are more critical than ever. Thank you for your amazing commitment and open-heartedness. Blessings from Atlanta! Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 20, 2012 at 5:07 pm I met this priest in London when he conducted a memorial service for my brother in law. He is a most charismatic man. A very good example of a true Christian. Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Debbie Shew says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (5) Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Video: Syrian Anglican priest urges dialogue for peace Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Advocacy Peace & Justice, By Matthew DaviesPosted Feb 15, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Marika Jenkins says: Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

Episcopal Relief & Development website highlights friends in Atlanta

first_imgEpiscopal Relief & Development website highlights friends in Atlanta Posted May 22, 2012 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Relief & Development Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Episcopal Relief & Development] This month’s Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development focuses on the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta’s efforts to engage congregations and communities in the fight against malaria through the NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund.  The feature especially highlights 11th-grader Adriana Embus, the winner of the 2012 World Malaria Day Make a Difference Essay Contest, who wrote about encountering malaria on a school visit to Liberia, and how it inspired her to take action and raise awareness about the deadly disease.Please note that the Power of Partnerships and Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development web features are now on an alternating schedule.  The next Power of Partnerships will be published in June.The Power of Partnerships and Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development web features present stories about the agency’s partners in the US and worldwide. Visit www.er-d.org to read past installments, find information about our programs or make a contribution.  You can also call 1.855.312.HEAL (4325). Gifts can be mailed to Episcopal Relief & Development, PO Box 7058, Merrifield, VA 22116-7058.last_img read more

Ferguson, Missouri: Church leaders aim to help rebuild community trust

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missouri Bishop Wayne Smith marches Aug. 14 with clergy and others through the Canfield Green apartment complex where 18-year-old Michael Brown was fatally shot Aug. 9. Photo: Mike Angell[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Teresa Mithen-Danieley gambled “there probably wouldn’t be tear gas” and took her two-year-old daughter Ruby Frances with her to the Aug. 14 march in Ferguson, Missouri, to begin to rebuild community trust after the Aug. 9 fatal police shooting of an unarmed black teenager and its violent aftermath.Along with Missouri Bishop Wayne Smith, she and other Episcopalians joined at least 1,000 other clergy, public officials, residents and supporters in the nearly two-mile march in Ferguson with clergy positioned on the perimeters and ends, according to Mithen-Danieley.“We wanted to try to be clear to anybody that wanted to participate in the march and to the police and to the public that this is a nonviolent event, and that we were all there in solidarity with the people of Ferguson.”As marchers approached the Canfield Green apartment complex where 18-year-old Michael Brown was fatally shot Aug. 9 “we were walking down into a valley of ranch-style homes and you could see how the whole neighborhood was tear-gassed,” she said.“You could see how the tear gas was used, it permeated the whole area,” said Mithen-Daniely, rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Tower Grove near St. Louis.The shooting — and the level of police violence directed at the predominantly African American community in its aftermath — has re-opened old wounds and painfully exposed racial and economic divides in the suburban St. Louis community of about 21,000.And the Aug. 15 police statement naming the officer involved in the shooting and identifying Michael Brown as a robbery suspect didn’t change any of that, according to Bishop Smith.“It’s unfortunate timing, that the mention of Michael Brown as a suspect was released at the same moment as the name of the officer was released,” he told ENS on Aug. 15. “It just did not seem right. It is absolutely a red herring when it comes to the shooting itself.”The lingering effects of the spiritual violence of racial and economic injustice “are not new to us; it’s something we’ve had to face for a long time,” added Smith, who in a statement on the diocesan website called upon all Episcopalians “especially those whose race or culture gives innate privilege, to look upon what has been laid bare, to pray about these things, humbly to learn from them, and to yearn and work for responses that would bring justice.”Lingering scars, racial and economic dividesWhile traveling to Ferguson from Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis for the Aug. 14 march Smith said: “I passed by Calvary Cemetery, where Dred Scott is buried, and I thought of that long and painful history that we’ve had with race relations here in St. Louis city and county.”A slave, Dred Scott sued to gain his freedom in a landmark case that eventually reached the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1857, the court ruled that because Scott was black, he was not a citizen and therefore had no right to sue.Smith said that he joined the march at the invitation of the St. Louis Metropolitan Clergy Coalition “a predominantly African American organization. We sent out email notification to clergy and laity and I really was heartened by the strong support,” he said.“I hope that our church really can follow the lead of what the community in Ferguson and surrounding communities need and want. We have to respect their integrity and authority,” he said.During the march Smith said he “walked with a young man from Morehouse College who drove from Atlanta with Ruby Sales” who had been invited to speak at a local event.“He wanted to be involved with conflict resolution in St. Louis and asked for my contact information,” Smith said. “I mentioned to him that yesterday was the feast of Jonathan Daniels” the Episcopal seminarian who died when he pushed Sales out of the way of a shotgun blast during the 1965 civil rights Freedom Summer in Hayneville, Alabama.‘A huge poverty of trust’The Very Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis, said after the Aug. 15 release of the officer’s name and information naming Brown as a robbery suspect that “the situation is changing moment by moment.”The timing of the release “speaks to the huge poverty of trust in our community; that’s one of the central issues here,” he said. “There has been over time an incredible deterioration of trust between the black community in St. Louis and the police department and the institutions of justice in general, and not just in Ferguson, but the whole metro area.”On Aug. 14, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon took supervision of security in Ferguson away from the local police and gave it to Highway Patrol Capt. Ronald S. Johnson, and he promised a change in tone from what the Rev. Steve Lawler and others had called “a militarization” of the police.State police joined with demonstrators during the Aug. 14 march. Noticeably absent were the riot gear, semi-automatic weapons, armored vehicles and excessive show of force previously used by the Ferguson police, he said.“That’s been the biggest shock, the biggest surprise, the police response,” said Lawler, rector of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church (http://www.saint-stephens.info) in Ferguson. “It’s really been intense, and it seems like it’s accelerated rather than decelerated the figuring out how to get folks back to working together.”Chester Hines, chairperson of the diocesan commission on dismantling racism was leading an anti-racism training in Sikeston, 145 miles south of St. Louis, that had been previously scheduled “before Ferguson blew up.”But he wasn’t surprised at the shooting or the violence, “as a result of my own experience with racism in this community for over 60 years now,” he said. “The reason I do this work is because of my own personal experiences of living with racism in St. Louis.”And, he said, the same circumstances in Ferguson are present in other communities. The difference is “Ferguson has a large enough population of people of color, that they were able to stand as a community against the forces of the police department. In most of our suburban communities people of color are really in a minority so they actually have very limited voice or impact.”Engaging ‘the Power of the Gospel’Yet, in spite of it all, Lawler said “the power of the Gospel” has been palpable.St. Stephen’s food pantry desperately needed restocking; many local businesses were closed and residents were reluctant to venture out because of the massive police presence, he said.“We couldn’t get food and we knew that this is the time of year when people have to buy school supplies and other things,” he said. “Monday would have been the first day of school for the local school district.“People are already stressed financially,” he added. “It’s an expensive month.”But the response was overwhelming, as diocesan congregations, community organizations and individuals flooded the food bank with food and personal items. For instance, Lawler said, “a guy I know who toggles in and out of being homeless but who stopped by and handed me a couple of cans of baked beans, which I know is probably half of the food he had for the day, if that.”“Another guy, whose son was in the wrong place at the wrong time, buying weed and was shot and killed a couple of weeks ago, came by with food, with such compassion for the community. There’s a level of connectivity that’s been here throughout, in the midst of all this.”Planning for additional prayer vigils, demonstrations and events is also underway, as the community begins to grapple with the long-term and challenging work of rebuilding trust and engaging reconciliation.Chuck Wynder, Episcopal Church missioner for social justice and advocacy said he has been working closely with his colleagues Missioner for Racial Reconciliation Heidi Kim and with Alex Baumgarten, who directs the church’s Office of Government Relations, “to see how we can companion the folks there and how we can support the diocese and the community.”“We want to make sure our witness and our advocacy is present both locally and church-wide and facilitate our missional response so that other parts of the church beyond Ferguson and the Diocese of Missouri know the church is present in the midst of all this,” he said.The Rev. Mike Angell, who as Episcopal Church missioner for young adult and campus ministries is based in St. Louis, said he wrote a question and answer sheet to help college students and young adults discuss the ramifications of the Ferguson tragedy.Beginning the hard task of reconciliationComing together and moving forward is a long-term challenge, Angell said. “It’s an issue of systemic racism,” he said. “We have a crisis in our country that broke through with what happened with Michael Brown. It’s ongoing. We have a lot of work to do today and isn’t the church exactly the place where we should be doing it?”The Rev. Teresa Mithen-Danieley agreed.“There’s been some immediate response this week, and I’m glad of that,” said Mithen-Danieley who grew up in Normandy, a community adjoining Ferguson. “But I want a long-term commitment,” she added.“To me, it doesn’t mean much unless the diocese as a whole and the people of the diocese continue to be invested and engaged in long-term economic justice and racial justice in our region. Unfortunately, this tragedy has helped people to see there are a lot of tensions that have been going on my whole lifetime, and I’m 37,” she said.“I hope this is an opportunity to bring this to the wider church, how racial and economic justice are tied together and that this is a long-term problem that’s not going to go away when the marching stops.”Kinman agreed.“Right now, it’s in the media, we’re riled up about it and that’s important and that’s good. But the issues this is all about are power and privilege and race and class and they have been around a long time. This will take a sustained effort to deal with.“And it’s going to take people of power and privilege and that’s most of us white Episcopalians and white St. Louisans; it will take us becoming educated and becoming really good listeners and examining how we are being called to change some of these systems that led to the killing Michael Brown.”The cathedral is having conversations about being part of that ongoing educational process, “and of healing, not healing to a point where everyone’s just sort of quiet again, but healing to where we reach a different level,” he said.“We’re never bringing Michael Brown back, but somehow that this can be redeemed,” he said.“It’s so easy in moments like this to cast one side, one person, one group of people as completely good and the other side as completely evil and we have to resist that at all costs. But, we are called to be ambassadors of Christ and ministers of reconciliation and we stand with everyone. We have to call all of us to be those images of God that are our best selves.“That’s the long-term work of the church, to build relationships of love and respect with everybody so we can bring people together and say let’s listen to everybody and look at who God is calling us to be.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rev. Gary Nowlinl says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Henry Roulin says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 18, 2014 at 10:22 pm I am from Trinity Episcopal Church in Farmington Hiills, Michigan. I see this picture I feel hopeful. I have seen nothing like it on national TV. Civil rights is an issue every citizen of the US whether black; white; brown or regardless of gender should care about . On TV I saw almost no white protesters. I find that disappointing. By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 15, 2014 Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC August 15, 2014 at 9:02 pm I applaud the church for seeking to rebuild trust and/or community. But I am disheartened that the church would be drawn into yet another mass media-driven event. We shouldn’t allow ourselves to be tools. We don’t know what happened with the officer and the decedent. Regardless of one’s political views for or against the police, we would do well to distance ourselves from anything to do with a race-baiter like Al Sharpton. We he comes to town, we should leave. Just sayin’ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA August 15, 2014 at 9:26 pm This is a problem of all our American society, which has been well-attested to here on this Website. Racism has been around a very long time, stemming of course from the time of slavery in our nation, and even the lack of equal rights given to all citizens from the outset. We must all, black and white, Asian and Native Americans, Latinos those of mixed-races–all Americans–resolve now to pray and work for justice for all, equality under the law for all, and economic and educational opportunity for all, in a society which is often bent on individual self-interest rather than desiring above all the common good–especially those of us in the dominant white group in this area and across the country. As a priest working in two churches of this diocese in the general area where this tragedy occurred a few days ago, I have become most cognizant of the injustices and inequality concerning African-Americans especially in that north St Louis County part of the St, Louis metro area, formerly virtually all white. I was fortunate to have for many years, slowly at first, a parish of roughly half black and half white, with good relations and shared leadership among all parishioners. That was in the Normandy area, not far from Ferguson. (St. Andrew’s in Northwoods, where Ascension Church now occupies the building. Owing to poor decisions, a miss-match happened between clerical and lay leadership some three years after my retirement, and the parish soon had to close.Stronger and wiser leadership and involvement by various within and beyond the church there could have meant a far different outcome, in my view. The dioceses of our Church need to provide much stronger and wiser support for struggling congregations, especially those with heavily black or mixed membership. [St. Andrew’s had a good number of Nigerians, mainly college students, as members, in addition to the African-Americans.] Teresa Mithen-Danieley, who is white, was a member there [St. Andrew’s] from birth–I baptized her and her younger brother!–and as related above, is a priest, quite effective I can say without reservation! She now is pastoring in the south St. Louis City [Tower Grove] area.)What we need now I believe is to take time to reflect, pray and have serious, informed discussion on all these matters, continuing to support the people of Ferguson of course, but waiting patiently for the outcome of all the investigations, perhaps trials, and the like, before coming to premature conclusions in the “blame game” in this whole affair. God help us all! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ferguson, Missouri: Church leaders aim to help rebuild community trust Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Daniel Zipperer says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 18, 2014 at 9:42 am SERMON ON FERGUSON.I have been an Episcopal priest for almost thirty years. In all that time, I have never done what I am going to do this morning, which is to preach on current events, rather than the appointed lessons. But I also served for many years as rector of St Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Ferguson, and even after I went into hospital chaplaincy, I contintue to live in the house we had purchased in Ferguson. I live in a safe quiet mixed race middle class neighborhood, but it is a neigborhood only a 5 minute drive from the looting, the violence, and the shooting. And I have done a lot of thinking about the situation.But first, a boring but important comment about the psychology of belief that is relevant to the Ferguson situation. On any important and controversial topic, facts do not dictate a single belief, a single interpretation. Facts can be arranged in different patterns, and some facts can be highlighted, while others are minimized. We have choices among a range of beliefs, and what casts the deciding vote is our HOPES.People get into arguments that they think are about facts Each recites the facts that support their side, and show how they can be arranged in a pattern that fits their belief. But the really important questions are “Why do you HOPE that that is true” and “What does it say about your character that you have those hopes?” and “Are those hopes appropriate hopes for Christian to have?”And I will tell you some hopes that are not worthy and appropriate for a Christian.It is not worthy and appropriate to hope that other people are total villains so that you can look down on them. And yet we all find it so very helpful to have enemies. Despise the enemy, deny their fellow-humanity, and you can be distract yourself from your own problems and faults.Focus on THOSE terrible people over there and you don’t have to examine yourself.The spiritual danger is that we will be tempted to HOPE that those people, the ones will label the OTHER, are just as bad, just as villainous, as we can possibly imagine.There are black people who HOPE that all whites are vile racists and white racism is the total explanation for all their problems. Some of them think white racism justifies looting and violence in response. There are white people who HOPE it is true that most or all black people are born criminals, who deserve any misfortune and poverty that they suffer. There are black people who think all cops are villains and no investigation or trial is needed to know the cop is guilty. There are whitepeople who think that any cop who shoots a black person is justified, and no trial or investigation is needed.I marched down West Florissant Avenue, where all the trouble is, with a group demonstrating for justice and peace. I was beside a young black man in his twenties named Marcel. Marcel said to me “There are good people and bad people in every group of people, but the trouble starts when people look at the bad people in the other group and say ‘Oh, they are all like that.’”Too many people, who claim to be Christians, hope that the worst is true of those who have a different skin color. Such hopes are not Christian. They come from our desire to focus on the sin outside ourselves and avoid thinking about the sin inside ourselves.Think you have enemies? Jesus commanded us to pray for our enemies.Think all the sinners are over there, with those other people, whoever THOSE people are? St Paul tells us that “ALL have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.” Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release The Rev. Carol Ruthven says: Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Ferguson, Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Eric Anderson says: Carolyn Brooks-Burton says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Racial Justice & Reconciliation Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Rev. Dr. Charles H. Morris says: Comments (7) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ August 18, 2014 at 1:02 pm Gary,I regret that I haven’t heard your sermons more often. What a brilliant and beautifully expressed insight here. Alex and I have kept you. Susan and family in our prayers!Love and peace to you all, and thank you for your strength! Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL August 16, 2014 at 10:41 am Rev. Morris, Thank you for sharing your story. We all need to share and hear stories like yours as we join hands together across The Episcopal Church to continue to work for economic, social and racial justice and reconciliation. – Rev. Carol Ruthven, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Lexington, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET August 20, 2014 at 11:41 am You are in y thoughts and prayers and let’s keep in mind what the Scriptures says in Psalm 127:1 “Unless the Lord builds the house, they labor in vain who build it; Unless the Lord guards the city, the Watchman stays awake in vain.” NKJV Let’s continue to SPEAK PEACE from the Word of GOD! Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

Episcopalians reaffirm their commitment to the environment

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopalians from the Diocese of California gathered under a tree at Lone Tree Point along the East Bay in Rodeo, California, northeast of San Francisco for the April 23 EcoConfirmation, where participants reaffirmed their commitment to the environment. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Rodeo, California] Three words, three additional words, is all it takes to expand the way Episcopalians are called to live out their faith to include care of the Earth.In the Episcopal Diocese of California, the Baptismal Covenant’s fifth and final question that follows the Apostles’ Creed, the question reads: “Will you strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of the Earth and of every human being?” The keyword, of course, being “Earth.”“For about as long as the bishop has been here he’s been reminding us in most baptisms and confirmations that we are committed to reconciliation with God, each other and the Earth,” said the Rev. Julia McCray-Goldsmith, the diocese’s canon for discipleship. “Part of that is his own deep commitment to healthy stewardship of the Earth; and I would say to the integrity of our incarnated nature, to ourselves as physical beings who really can’t be separated from the human and natural ecologies we dwell in.”On Saturday, April 23, the day after Earth Day, which this year marked the historic signing of the Paris Agreement, the first international climate agreement aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and limiting global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius, the Diocese of California hosted its third annual EcoConfirmation.The Rev. Este Cantor, vicar of Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Berkeley, California, leads a regular attendee (behind her), into the Cosmic Walk to be received into the Episcopal Church during the April 23 EcoConfirmation at Lone Tree Point in Rodeo. The man’s dog followed him into the circle where he was received by Bishop Marc Andrus. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceDuring the EcoConfirmation participants uphold their baptismal vow to “cherish the wondrous works of God, and protect the beauty and integrity of all creation.” As a community, they recommit themselves to the Fifth Mark of Mission, “to strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the Earth.”During his homily, California Bishop Marc Andrus, who represented Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Episcopal Church at the April 22 signing ceremony of the climate agreement at the United Nations headquarters in New York, reflected on the significance of the previous day.“The Episcopal Church and all the Christian world, indeed all the world of faith, is given this moment to stand with all the Earth and the healing of what has become what is a very sick Mother Earth,” he said. “And this little Earth, so fragile, so handmade in every way, and yet so incredibly beautiful to me, is a seed that can be as powerful as the seed that began all of this. Why? Because it is God who starts the seed to grow. It is God that gives the growth. God who makes the seed. God who blesses us with this day.”The Paris Agreement calls on countries worldwide to limit carbon emissions, which will require a transition from fossil fuels to more renewable sources to meet their energy needs. In its third incarnation, rather than take place in a place of unspoiled natural beauty, like a retreat center in Sonoma County or Half Moon Bay, the outdoor service took place at Lone Tree Point in the shadows of an oil refinery in Rodeo, a diverse working-class community in the East Bay 25 miles northeast of San Francisco.The Rev. Susan Champion, rector of Christ the Lord Episcopal Church, Pinole, leads more than 25 participants in the April 23 EcoConfirmation on a journey to the communion table, stopping for prayers at three points along the way where beauty and degradation meet. She and her husband, the Rev. Peter Champion, live in Rodeo. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe poignant location, given the signing of the climate agreement and its emphasis on reducing dependence on fossil fuels, was suggested by the Rev. Susan Champion, rector of Christ the Lord Episcopal Church in neighboring Pinole, who lives in Rodeo with her husband, the Rev. Peter Champion, and substitute teaches in the local public school system.When proposing the location, Champion asked: “What if we held it at a place that would remind us of the human degradation of the environment?”The Phillips 66 refinery is one of five in the San Francisco Bay Area: four are located in Costa County. It processes 120,000 barrels a day. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe Phillips 66 refinery is massive, and is one of five oil refineries in the Bay Area; it has repeatedly received notices for violating state air quality standards and is ranked as California’s seventh most toxic polluter. Not only is the refinery huge, but it’s near a public housing project and a state-run Head Start program serving children. Many residents, said Champion, suffer from asthma and other air-quality related illnesses.Rodeo is unincorporated, she added, and therefore doesn’t have a city council, its residents represented by one man on the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors. Local media doesn’t cover the refinery, and it was through a brief carried on the Dow Jones News wire that ran in the Wall Street Journal earlier this year that residents learned an equipment malfunction had caused 500 pounds of sulfur dioxide to be released from the 120,000-barrel-a-day refinery.The service began with the Cosmic Walk, a mediation on the history of creation beginning with the Big Bang 14 billion years ago and the formation of the Earth’s atmosphere, through the emergence of homo sapiens, the writing of the Bible and Jesus’s birth to the discovery of gold in California in 1848 and oil becoming a major industry in the state in the early 20th century to 1969, when humans first viewed the Earth from space.So how can the EcoConfirmation remind Episcopalians of the impact humans are having on the planet? “I think the use of the Cosmic Walk reminding us of our deep interrelatedness is important,” said Andrus following the service.Miriam MacGillis, of New Jersey’s Genesis Farms, created the Cosmic Walk as a way to bring the Earth’s 14-billion-year history from something humans know in their heads to something they know in their hearts. Andrus and his wife, Shelia, brought it to the Diocese of California shortly after his consecration as bishop 10 years ago.As Andrus mentioned during the service, the world is in the proposed Anthropocene Epoch, or the epoch when human influence is having a significant impact on the Earth’s geology and ecosystems. To consciously curb human influence will take a shift in human thinking regarding how humans relate to one another and the ecosystems and economies they are a part of.“The move that we have to make at this point is the move from being a world where there are some subjects like humans and then there are many objects, and that would include humans used for labor and trafficking … where humans are used as tools,” he said, following the service. “Basically, the whole Earth has been objectified and that’s a process that’s been going on in the West for about 400 years.“So what we want to do is work our way out of that and into a universe of subjects. This is a very graspable way to understand our interrelatedness to not only each other but to the Earth and all the life of the Earth.”Andrus gave his homily, confirmed one man and received another into the Episcopal Church, and the majority of the remaining 25 people recommitted themselves to Christ and renewed the Baptismal Covenant. Then, Champion led the group on a journey to the communion table, stopping for prayers at three points along the way where beauty and degradation meet.At the first stop, participants looked out over the bay and acknowledged that for 150 years people have allowed pollutants to enter its waters; on the second stop they reflected on the railroad tracks that have transported crude oil in ill-equipped rail cars when oil prices are high, threatening residents’ safety; and finally, to the top of an incline where they viewed the refinery, the dirtiest in California.“This piece of land, when I first saw it – my heart just broke,” said McCray-Goldsmith, adding that the land itself is like stations of blessings and grief. “This land is kind of a sacramental window, an outward and visible sign and an inward spiritual grace that includes the grace of tears, the grace of grief for the damage we’ve done to the Earth … as we’ve gone out to various sites, the sites have become sacraments every time.”– Lynette Wilson is a reporter/editor for the Episcopal News Service. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 May 1, 2016 at 11:13 am I’d love to see the headline, ‘Episcopalians reaffirm their commitment to Jesus Christ’. [God instructs his children to , ‘honor Me –not the created things.’] Press Release Service Episcopalians reaffirm their commitment to the environment Diocese of California hosts its third annual EcoConfirmation Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY April 27, 2016 at 11:17 am The eight commitments of the Baptismal Covenant bind us to belief in the Holy Trinity, and to Christian practice in terms of worship, repentance, evangelism, service, and justice. A confirmation service which emphasizes only one of these areas of practice (and then only through one specific avenue of justice-seeking) is sorely out of balance. Do we also have confirmation services for evangelism? How about penitence?Committing ourselves to environmental service work in the Church’s name is a GREAT idea. But it should not be done through confirmation in such a way as to overshadow the fullness of all the commitments of the Baptismal Covenant. This sort of commitment seems like it would be an ideal use for the grossly under-used “A Form of Commitment to Christian Service” on pp. 420-1 of the BCP, whose stated purpose is “to make or renew a commitment to the service of Christ in the world, either in general terms, or upon undertaking some special responsibility.” L.G. Marshall says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listingcenter_img David Hedges says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA M. J. Wise says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL April 27, 2016 at 9:11 am So…how much of the jet fuel for that Bishop Andrus symbolic treaty signing visit came from that refinery? Did he atone for objectifying the earth in that way at this event?We have met the enemy, and he is us. April 30, 2016 at 4:15 pm It would seem that there are Episcopal bishops who believe that all things necessary for salvation are contained in the Democratic Party Platform. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 26, 2016 Environment & Climate Change Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (4) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Kenneth Knapp says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Advocacy Peace & Justice, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Iglesia de Alaska, que se fusionó en 1979, cree que…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Called to Common Mission 15th Anniversary, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Foto de un grupo de miembros de la iglesia luterana-episcopal de la Epifanía en una caminata durante un retiro de jóvenes este otoño.Nota de la redacción: El 6 de enero de 2001, luego de 30 años de diálogo, la Iglesia episcopal y la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América, en tanto conservaban su autonomía, convinieron en juntarse para colaborar en la misión conjunta en el mundo y permitir que los clérigos se movieran libremente entre las dos iglesias. Este semana, ENS  publica la serie “Llamados a una misión común” que celebra 15 años de plena comunión episcopal-luterana.[Episcopal News Service] Una de las más antiguas congregaciones episcopales-luteranas comenzó con un apretón de manos entre obispos. El sentimiento de buena voluntad aún orienta a la congregación luterana-episcopal de Valdez, Alaska.Localizado en el canal del Príncipe Guillermo, el pueblo de Valdez tiene una población de aproximadamente 4.000 habitantes. El pueblo más cercano con una iglesia episcopal se encuentra a más de 400 kilómetros. Aunque hay 50 congregaciones en la Diócesis de Alaska, la mayoría son iglesias rurales muy pequeñas. Sólo un puñado de clérigos con preparación teológica presta servicios en la diócesis.“Le digo a la congregación todo el tiempo que ellos son como la Iglesia se va a ver de aquí a 20 o 30 años”, dijo la Rda. Christina Mauntel, pastora de la congregación. “Tenemos solamente un empleado a sueldo. Las señoras limpian la iglesia y todo el mundo trabaja unido para mantenerla. Tenemos un laicado muy fuerte que sabe dirigir. No están más apegados a una u otra denominación, sino que están comprometidos entre sí”.Según los miembros más antiguos, la unión comenzó cuando la congregación episcopal de Valdez se resquebrajó por alguna razón. El sacerdote que estaba en ese tiempo se acercó al pastor luterano y le habló de unir fuerzas. El diálogo continuó entre los obispos, quienes aprobaron una fusión en 1979 —22 años antes de que la Iglesia Episcopal y la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América se unieran oficialmente en plena comunión.La congregación fusionada usaba el edificio de la iglesia episcopal y pagó un alquiler nominal durante los primeros años; finalmente, contó Steve Newcomer, presidente del consejo de la congregación, el edificio le fue cedido a los luteranos. Pero en todos los otros sentidos, ellos son una sola congregación, afirmó  Newcomer.Tener una iglesia unida “nunca ha sido un problema para ninguno de nosotros allí”, dijo Newcomer que asiste a la Epifanía [Epiphany] desde que se mudó a Valdez en 1994. “Seré sincero: estuve asistiendo a la iglesia aquí durante una década antes de que supiera lo que era episcopal y lo que era luterano… Nuestra misión es ser un lugar de acogida para todos los cristianos. Ponemos nuestro mayor empeño en aceptar a cualquiera que entre por la puerta”.Esta hospitalidad radical está profundamente arraigada en las congregaciones. Tanto Mauntel como Newcomer recordaban un letrero en el sótano que anunciaba que la iglesia era un lugar donde eran bienvenidos a reunirse y a alabar a Dios. Con el transcurso de los años, episcopales, metodistas, bautistas americanos, presbiterianos, discípulos de Cristo y otros grupos denominacionales se han reunido y han adorado en el edificio de la Epifanía.“No cerramos las puertas [de la Iglesia]”, dijo Newcomer. “Queremos que la gente que busca albergue pueda usar nuestro edificio. Dejamos a cualquier grupo que no se proponga hacer un uso lucrativo de nuestra iglesia. Se nos conoce como la iglesia del pueblo donde todo el mundo es bienvenido”.Aunque ella nunca había puesto un pie en Alaska, la naturaleza ecuménica de la Epifanía atrajo a Mauntel cuando consideró a la congregación como su primer llamado después del seminario. Pastora luterana, para ella es una alegría y un reto aprender más acerca de las tradiciones y la política episcopales.Por ejemplo, la Iglesia Episcopal es más estricta que los luteranos en lo que respecta a administrar el sacramento de la Sagrada Eucaristía, dijo Mauntel. Esto ha llevado a una situación interesante: uno de los líderes laicos episcopales de la iglesia tiene permiso para administrar los sacramentos en el culto luterano, pero no puede presidir en una reunión episcopal.Priscilla Gregg ha vivido toda su vida en Valdez y asistió a la iglesia episcopal de niña y de adulta. Ella formaba parte de la congregación episcopal cuando se fusionó con la iglesia luterana.“Al principio hubo algunas dificultades”, afirmó ella. “Pero decidimos temprano juntarnos como una familia. Nuestro foco a lo largo de los años ha sido que no somos dos cuerpos separados, sino que somos un solo cuerpo”.Ella espera que otras congregaciones del país contemplen la fusión como una oportunidad.“Lo primero para ellos es fijarse en qué se asemejan y en qué difieren”, dijo Gregg. “Y no asustarse. Habrá cambios, pero podemos resolverlos juntos y salir fortalecidos”.– Richelle Thompson es subdirectora y gerente editorial de Forward Movement. Traducción de Vicente Echerri Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ecumenical & Interreligious Iglesia de Alaska, que se fusionó en 1979, cree que el futuro se le parecerá Llamados a la Misión Común: 15 años de asociación luterana-episcopal In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Por Richelle Thompson Posted Dec 15, 2016 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

ENS series on Episcopal Church’s anti-hunger efforts explores all levels…

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The beloved church coffee hour may soon return as COVID-19 fades in US Posted May 4, 2021By Bob Smietana Western New York church partners with farmers market for food ministry Posted Apr 28, 2021 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service UTO grants help feeding ministries expand to meet needs of communities hit by pandemic Posted Nov 11, 2020By David Paulsen Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Farm ministry distributes seedlings in lower Michigan amid churchwide call to plant, pray, proclaim Posted May 28, 2020By David Paulsen Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Church pantries help Diocese of Indianapolis step up food ministries during pandemic Posted Apr 16, 2020 Maine congregation keeps local lobster industry afloat by buying in bulk Posted Apr 20, 2020By Egan Millard Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Total: 30 Episcopalians face challenges to help the hungry during pandemic Posted Mar 26, 2020By Mary Frances Schjonberg An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Food Ministry from The Benedictine Way Posted May 19, 2020Diocese of Nebraska – The Benedictine Way Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopalians try to counter ‘startling’ problem of food insecurity among college students Posted Feb 19, 2019By Mary Frances Schjonberg Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Actors’ Guild offers aid to New York performers as pandemic devastates livelihoods Posted Jan 22, 2021By David Paulsen Maine diocese’s food distribution ministry connects farmers with jobless residents, both hit by COVID-19 Posted Aug 25, 2020By David Paulsen Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Churches Create New $100,000 Matching Fund for Food Bank Donations in Michigan Posted Apr 22, 2020Episcopal Diocese of Michigan Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL center_img Good News Gardens begins its second year of praying, planting and proclaiming Posted Mar 3, 2021By Heather Beasley Doyle Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls North Carolina ministry promotes health care access, rooted in bonds formed over prayer, food Posted Dec 10, 2020By David Paulsen Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Church farm brings two Southwest Florida congregations together as ministry yields first fruits Posted Jan 29, 2020By David Paulsen Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Campus food ministries come in all serving sizes Posted Feb 19, 2019By Mary Frances Schjonberg Episcopalians try to counter ‘startling’ problem of food insecurity among college students Posted Feb 19, 2019 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Frozen turkey donations highlight Episcopalians’ efforts to fight food insecurity on Thanksgiving Posted Nov 23, 2020By David Paulsen Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Food and Faith Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Church’s grassroots efforts help Navajoland feed families impacted by COVID-19 outbreak Posted May 14, 2020By David Paulsen Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group 12 Featured Events 400 students served by spring break feeding ministry as Eastern Michigan church adjusts to pandemic Posted Mar 30, 2020By David Paulsen last_img read more

Science-faith partnership is vital for tackling climate change, Archbishop of…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Science-faith partnership is vital for tackling climate change, Archbishop of Canterbury says Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby told an international gathering of faith leaders that the fight against the climate crisis would benefit from the relationship between science and faith. He made his comments in the first of a series of online meetings being held in advance of the United Nations’ COP26 climate change conference in Glasgow, Scotland, later this year. Welby said that “the relationship between science and faith presents us with a very real and a powerful route to lasting, major change. Our global reach, our commitment to local communities and our hope combined with the knowledge and expertise of science can forge a powerful alliance.”He welcomed United States President Joe Biden’s decision to resume America’s commitment to the Paris Accord and said: “I speak as a Christian. Jesus teaches us that there are no greater commandments than to love God and love our neighbor. To abide by those commandments as a Christian today is to step up to the challenge of climate change and connected environmental crises.”Read the entire article here. Environment & Climate Change TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Posted Mar 3, 2021 Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Tags Featured Events Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Archbishop of Canterbury, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

3 tips when buying a used car

first_img December 14, 2017 at 6:33 pm If you’re in the market for a used vehicle, the car-buying process can be both an exciting and daunting experience. Whether you are a first-time buyer or looking for a different model, a car is one of the largest purchases you will ever make. It’s not only important to make sure you have the right car for your lifestyle, but one that makes the most sense for your personal financial situation.If you are one of the millions of Americans looking to buy, here are some tips to consider.Get pre-approvedSimilar to buying a house, it’s important to know what you can afford before you start hunting for your dream car. If you will be financing a vehicle, getting pre-approved for a car loan may save you a lot of heartburn during your car search.Interest rates continue to be at historic lows, but it’s important to check in on what rates you may qualify for and how it will affect the price of what you can afford.“It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of looking for a new car and forget about the affordability piece,” says Renee Horne, vice president of Consumer Lending at USAA. “Before you even begin your search, give your lender a call to see what you can actually qualify for and what will fit in your budget.”A good tip to keep in mind is to not let your car payment exceed more than 15 percent of your monthly net income. While you don’t have to stick to it, this rule will help give you a rough estimate of what you may be spending each month.Know what you can affordKnowing what you can afford reaches beyond your car loan payment. Although used cars are typically less expensive, they may have more maintenance and ownership costs.“It’s important to look at the total cost of ownership,” says Heather Pollard, vice president of Auto Experience at USAA. “Everyday expenses such as gas, insurance, taxes, maintenance and future repairs are all associated with owning a vehicle.”Knowing a rough estimate of these expenses will help you stay on budget in the long run. Simple online loan calculators, like this one at USAA, can help give you an idea of how much you can afford.Narrow your choicesWith countless choices available, finding the right car for you can be a challenge. Your budget should help narrow some of your choices, but consider your lifestyle as well.Do you have young children or plan to start a family soon? Then you might want to consider the highest IIHS safety ratings. Do you frequently travel for work? In that case, improved gas mileage and reduced emissions are important factors. Remember, all those extra upgrades come with a higher insurance price tag and are depreciating assets once you drive off the lot.Although you may be more inclined to go after a new car with the latest cutting-edge technology, a pre-owned vehicle may be the better alternative for your lifestyle and budget. Better still, used car prices are the lowest they have been in years. Even if you opt for a slightly older version of the model you’re interested in, many used models still offer similar advanced features while saving you thousands of dollars in the end.Need help finding the right car for you? The USAA Car Buying Service can help. Reply I do like that one of the first pieces of advice that the article gives is to get pre-approved for your used car. After all, if you can do that then you will know the exact amount of money that you have to spend on the vehicle. This can really help you when assembling a budget to stick to once you start looking around at cars. Reply Alexandria Martinez 8 COMMENTS UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 I really like that you talked about not getting emotionally attached to the car or even excited about it. My younger sister is looking to buy pre-owned Fords for sale so she doesn’t have to rely on our parents to get her around. I’ll be sure to talk to her about not getting attached to cars when meeting with an Auto Dealer. October 26, 2017 at 9:17 am August 30, 2017 at 1:38 pm I’m trying to set up a budget as to what I can afford on a car, and I found some the tips you provided to be very helpful. I really appreciated how you mentioned the importance of taking the cost of things like gas and insurance into consideration when getting an idea of what I can afford. I’ll be sure to do this so I don’t accidentally end up spending more than I can afford. October 17, 2017 at 10:56 pm Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSUSAAUsed Cars Previous articleCentral Florida Foundation announces social enterprise acceleratorNext articleNew on Netflix in July Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR My husband and I want to look around for a used car for our son to drive to school, but we have never bought a used car before and don’t know what to do. That is a great idea to have a budget and know a rough estimate of different expenses that will go along with the car. I think having a budget will help us find a good car for our son. Thank you for the tips! Please enter your comment! Callum Palmer November 29, 2017 at 8:16 pm Reply I am thinking about getting a pre-owned car for sale and want some tips. The idea to narrow your choices was really helpful for me and something I will look into. I will consider things like my lifestyle to help narrow these choices further.center_img Reply January 8, 2018 at 7:26 pm Roger Middleton I like that you talked about getting approved for a loan before you decided to buy a car. I am going to buy a car for the first time this month. I can see how it would be nice to have a loan approved first because it would help me choose a car that fits my budget. Ashley Turns My husband and I are in need of a used car since our old one is on its last leg. So I like your suggestion to start narrowing down your choices by considering things like if you have a family or if we travel a lot. Since we both live pretty far from our jobs, well be sure to get a used car that can handle more travel time. Scott Adams Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. January 12, 2018 at 5:47 pm Finley Moreira December 26, 2017 at 11:27 pm Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Kyle Wayne Deb Pearl Reply Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply My wife has been wanting a car for a while now and I’m wanting to surprise her with one for her upcoming birthday. I liked that you had mentioned that it can be important to know what you can afford and to take the cost of maintenance into account. Once I can find a used car seller, I’ll be looking into the price and figuring how much a car might cost to maintain and everything so I can get the best deal. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Reply Reply last_img read more