Butterfly Evolution Pushed 70 Million Years Before Flowers

first_imgNew fossil evidence puts the squeeze on Darwinians, making butterflies appear suddenly, with complex mouth parts, before there were any flowers to pollinate. Time to rescue the theory again.Keeping the evolutionary story consistent is like having to modify a play with the characters constantly making their entry earlier than they were supposed to. We’ve seen that numerous times. The latest is about butterflies (Lepidopterans), the darlings of the insect world. Reporters are scrambling to keep the crown on King Charles (Darwin) in the aftermath of fossil butterfly scales found in Jurassic rock they claim is 70 million Darwin Years older than the evolution script says they were supposed to appear on stage. This means they appeared already as modern-looking butterflies 200 million Darwin Years ago.Moths and butterflies existed during Jurassic era, millions of years before flowering plants, team reports (Science Daily). “A team of scientists report on new evidence that primitive moths and butterflies existed during the Jurassic period, approximately 50 million years earlier than the first flowering plants, shedding new light on one of the most confounding cases of co-evolution.” It wasn’t co-evolution, though, if butterflies lived just fine for 50 million Darwin Years before the plants they were supposed to co-evolve with first appeared.Scientists have accidentally found the oldest ever butterfly or moth fossils  (The Conversation): Now researchers in the Netherlands have discovered Lepidoptera fossils that are older than any previously found, proving these familiar insects have been around for at least 200m years,” worries paleontologist David Martill. “The particular type of fossils found mean we have to rethink Lepidoptera evolution.” [insert Tontologism here; see Darwin Dictionary].The Oldest Butterflies on Earth Had No Flowers to Feed On (Live Science). “Some of the fossils share features with modern moths in the suborder Glossata, which have a straw-like proboscis that can suck up fluids like nectar,” writes Darwinist reporter Laura Geggel. “Given their complexity, and the time it would’ve taken to evolve to have such complex features, these fossils push the calculated age of glossatan moths back by about 70 million years to the Late Triassic ‘refuting ancestral association of the group with flowering plants,’ the researchers wrote in the study.”Monarch butterfly using proboscis to suck nectar from a flower (Illustra Media)Darwinians still have some tricks to keep Darwin’s crown glued onto his mummy’s head. They can say that butterflies slurped on gymnosperm sap before the flowers cornered the butterfly market. That could be reasonable, since butterflies can eat tree sap and other things. They could introduce ghost lineages, imagining butterfly ancestors further back in time than they had assumed. And they can use the sidestepping tactic, smiling for the press and saying that the embarrassing situation “sheds light on evolution.”What they cannot do is show the public a series of fossils showing the gradual evolution of a proboscis, which is admittedly one of the “complex features” that should have taken time to evolve even for Darwinians. The Illustra Media film Metamorphosis shows this complexity it detail, showing close-up footage of the proboscis coming out of the chrysalis as two long half-tubes that the adult fastens together with its palpi (mouth parts). Even more challenging for evolution, this complex structure forms inside the chrysalis from a previous form—the caterpillar—that did not have a proboscis, and fed on different food. The obstacles these facts present to evolutionary theory are explained in the film.Martill hedged his bets, saying,If the fossil record can be pushed back 70m years in one stroke, it may get pushed back even further, and we’d need another way to explain the change.Whatever the trigger for the development of the butterfly proboscis, it was clearly an evolutionary innovation that resulted in phenomenal diversity and added immensely to the beauty of planet Earth.Insect fossils incl. moth at Florissant Fossil Beds (Darwin date 34 my). Photo by David Coppedge.The source paper in Science Advances advances another conundrum: these delicate little flying insects managed to survive the Triassic extinction (the “end-Triassic biotic crisis), another tangle in the convoluted story of evolution that unravels if butterfly origin precedes the catastrophe. The authors admit, “the early evolutionary history of these insects remains murky and mired in an exceedingly poor fossil record.” Now that fossil evidence pushes butterflies 70 million years back, does the paper explain how the proboscis evolved? Their answer invokes the “mother-of-necessity” angle in Darwinian storytelling: “Development of the proboscis may be regarded as an adaptive innovation to sucking free liquids for maintaining the insect’s water balance under arid conditions.” This idea should be testable. Go into the desert and see if it evolves on you. If it doesn’t, then death also “may be regarded as an adaptive innovation” to free up the gene pool for humans who happen to evolve straw-like mouths.About Those Flowers…An article on Phys.org tantalizes readers with news about “the origin of flower-making genes.” Does it succeed? Only by hand-waving about a “likely” just-so story. First, though, the author claims his turf. The first sentence announces, “Flowering plants have evolved from plants without flowers.”The DAM Law appeared on schedule in the discussion of flowering plants: namely, the phrase “Darwin’s Abominable Mystery.” Look in Science Daily, where the phrase is part and parcel of the story about the origin of flowering plants. It also appears in Science Daily‘s latest confabulation about “How flowering plants conquered the world.” Here’s the story; is it plausible?Over the last thirty years researchers have shown that the flowering plants have unparalleled rates of photosynthesis. This has allowed them to grow faster and to outcompete ferns and conifers which had dominated ecosystems for hundreds of millions of years. The secret to the metabolic success of flowering plants is their specialized leaves that facilitate faster rates of water transport and carbon dioxide uptake. But how were the flowering plants able to build leaves capable of these high rates of transpiration and photosynthesis?This new research provides a mechanism. By scouring the literature for data, the authors argue that these anatomical innovations are directly linked to the size of their genome.This speculation, naturally, does nothing to explain the origin of photosynthesis itself. It makes the beauty of large leaves a matter of accident (the Stuff Happens Law). And what good is an answer that creates more problems than it solves?Although this research answers a major question, it opens the door to many more. Why were the flowering plants able to shrink their genomes more than other plant groups? What innovations in genome structure and packing have the flowering plants exploited? How have the ferns and conifers managed to elude extinction despite their large genomes and cells?Evolutionists are not perturbed by having more questions, because it provides job security for storytellers.The mystery is not abominable. Darwin is. “Lying lips are an abomination to the Lord,” says the Good Book, “But those who deal faithfully are His delight.” (Proverbs 12:22) (Visited 892 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Wives of two dons battle it out in Siwan

first_imgKavita Singh. | Photo Credit: Amarnath Tewary In conversation with Hena ShahabIt’s 7.30 a.m. and a motley crowd has gathered outside the modest home of imprisoned “Sultan of Siwan” Mohd. Shahabuddin in Pratapur village. Over two dozen SUVs are parked outside. Some of the occupants are sitting beneath trees, while others form a semi-circle on the verandah of the old house. Fully covered in burkha and hijab, Hena Shahab, Shahabuddin’s wife, is standing on the half-closed doorsill and instructing a group about the day’s campaign. Contesting the Lok Sabha poll on an RJD ticket, Ms. Shahab takes some time off to respond to questions.You have become mature now… earlier in the 2009 and 2014 Lok Sabha polls you were a contestant with very few words on your lips.Paristhithi sab kuch sikha deti hai (The situation makes you learn everything).This time your fight is against the wife of another don… how do you see the challenge?I don’t see any challenge. And moreover, I do not wish to make any comment on others. I want to focus only on my work and leave the rest to the people of Siwan who know well what my husband has done for them and what others have done.After losing twice, how do you think you’ll win this time?I lost in the 2009 parliamentary poll because I got very little time and I was a new entrant in politics… I could hardly speak at that time. In 2014 it was “Modi wave” that swept the poll. But this time, I’ve got experience and people too have realised what PM Modi promised them and what he has fulfilled. All the people cannot be cheated all the time.Who do you find a better politician — Lalu Prasad or Nitish Kumar? And why?Lalu Prasad always. He is the only mass leader of Bihar who cares for the downtrodden and becomes their voice. He doesn’t change, he doesn’t betray his people.Do you miss your husband?Yes, I miss him a lot… the people of Siwan miss him a lot.In conversation with Kavita SinghIt’s 11. 30 a.m. and the blistering heat has forced everyone indoors, including Kavita Singh, the NDA candidate and wife of gangster Ajay Singh. Mr. Singh has been challenging Mohd. Shahabuddin’s sway in Siwan for several years. The couple are inside a local BJP leader’s house in the town. Mr. Singh, surrounded by a few of his men, is busy on his mobile phone asking people to ensure his wife’s victory. Ms. Singh, who has been MLA twice, comes out after some time. Resplendent in yellow sari, bangles, gold earrings, finger rings, mangal sutra and a tattoo of her husband’s name on her right hand, she appears more articulate than her husband. She speaks like a seasoned politician.center_img  How do you feel contesting the Lok Sabha poll for the first time?Not much difference, except that we have to visit more people in more areas. But I’m getting an overwhelming response everywhere as people have made up their mind to bring Ram Rajya in Siwan with Modi ji as Prime Minister.How do you find Hena Shahab as a challenger?Everyone knows in Siwan who she is. She has been defeated twice in the last two parliamentary polls and she will be defeated for the third time as well.But you too are a wife of a don accused in several criminal cases.All the cases lodged against my husband are false and politically motivated. He is a desh-bhakt (patriot) and has been challenging the reign of terror unleashed in Siwan. If he is a gangster, why have people voted to elect me as an MLA twice? I feel bad when people call him a don.What are the issues you raise when asking people to vote for you?Desh ko bachana hai, Modi ji ko phir ek baar PM banana hain (We’ve to protect our country and make Modi ji our Prime Minister again). I also tell people about the development work done by Nitish Kumar’s government in the State.Who is a better leader Nitish Kumar, Lalu Prasad or PM Modi?In the country it is Modi ji and in the State it is Nitish ji.last_img read more

NCAA Season 93’s Best 7: Week 8

first_imgMOST READ Streaking Ginebra outlasts Star in OT NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters LATEST STORIES For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. With the collegiate season in full swing, INQUIRER lists the week’s top seven performers in the ongoing NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament. From their game statistics to their overall impact in the outcomes, everything is weighed to come up with the best players from the week that was.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Forty-five games done, and it seems like the battle lines have already been drawn.Lyceum and San Beda have established control of the field, but the rest of the pack are not far behind, with leaders already gearing up for the homestretch of the eliminations come the second round.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingHowever, we must first put the spotlight on the first round as last year’s Final Four teams took center stage and rounded out their schedules.Here’s our list of this week’s top performers. Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side 1. Javee Mocon – F, San Beda Red Lions19 points, 14 rebounds, 3 assists, 2 steals, 1 blockLast Week: N/APhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netHard work pays off, especially for Javee Mocon.Playing second fiddle behind leader Robert Bolick all season long, the versatile forward finally gained his share of the spotlight as he helped San Beda close out the first round on a seven-game winning streak.Mocon may not get the lion’s share of the limelight for the Red Lions, but there’s no doubt that his contributions are largely to blame for his side’s ascent this NCAA season.2. Robert Bolick – G, San Beda Red Lions23 points, 6 rebounds, 2 assistsLast Week: N/AADVERTISEMENT 5. Kent Salado – G, Arellano Chiefs26 points, 2 rebounds, 2 assistsLast Week: N/APhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netKent Salado could just carry so much for the Arellano.Despite the speedster’s best efforts, he still can’t stop the Chiefs from losing five of their last six games to finish the first round.One thing going Arellano’s way, though, is the week-long break, giving Salado, coach Jerry Codiñera, and the rest of the team to reassess their standing as they seek to make a huge run in the second round.6. Christian Buñag – C, Mapua Cardinals15 points, 21 reboundsLast Week: N/APhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netWhen one door closes, another one opens.Luckily for Christian Buñag, the injuries abound the Mapua lineup led to him racking up consistent double-doubles through the course of the first roundUnfortunately, those stats aren’t translating to wins, and Buñag needs more help to validate the numbers he’s pouring for the Cardinals.7. Jed Mendoza – G, JRU Heavy Bombers12 points, 5 rebounds, 2 assistsLast Week: N/APhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAnother strong showing from Jed Mendoza results to another win for JRU.The first-year playmaker has proven that he’s no one-game wonder, emerging as a solid contributor for Meneses’ rotation after the first round.center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netWhat a way for Bolick to cap off the first round.Allowing his teammates to step up in the past few games, the swingman finally took the baton and torched the net early in San Beda’s 95-70 thumping of Arellano, getting his baskets in the first half to set the tone for the blowout.The game may have been billed as a Finals rematch, but just like in last year’s championship duel, Bolick remains to be the Chiefs’ bane and made the Red Lions no match for the opposition.3. Aaron Bordon – G, JRU Heavy Bombers17 points (8/14 FG), 4 assistsLast Week: N/AAaron Bordon. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netCoach Vergel Meneses continues to stumble on surprise contributors for Jose Rizal University, this time, unearthing Aaron Bordon.The transferee from Cavite State University stepped up and tallied a career-best 17 points to provide the offensive boost for the Heavy Bombers in their close 68-59 escape of Mapua.If Bordon sustains his form, it shouldn’t be a surprise that JRU can hold on to its standing and move on once again to the Final Four.4. Donald Tankoua – C, San Beda Red Lions15 points, 5 rebounds, 6 assists, 1 blockLast Week: N/AAaron BordonSlowly but surely, Donald Tankoua is getting his groove back.Evoking memories of last season’s Finals, the Cameroonian big man churned out his best outing in the first round as San Beda once again got the better of Arellano on Tuesday.The signs are promising, and if Tankoua continues this tear, there’s no doubt that the Red Lions can also sustain this winning run. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim If Mendoza continues this stretch in the second round, things may continue looking up for the Heavy Bombers. View commentslast_img read more