SMC hosts foreign language celebration

first_imgSaint Mary’s students shared in the native languages of six women from five different countries Monday through “Writing Across the World,” an event sponsored by the Saint Mary’s English Language School. At the event, which also marked the beginning of International Week, the women translated and transcribed students’ names into their native languages. She designed the event to promote dialogue – in English or otherwise –  between students, Terra Cowham, assistant director for International Student Scholar Services at the English Language School, said.  “During International Week, we want to highlight all the diversity in the international students on our campus,” Cowham said. “We thought it’d be really awesome if they wrote some themes or sayings while sharing their native language with us.”  “This event begins a cultural festival,” Ethiopian student Neima Mohammed said. Mohammed’s ability to speak English fluently is a result of five months of language classes from Saint Mary’s, she said. The Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership offers a rigorous program in the English Language School to non-native speakers, and Cowham said the four-week program is open to anyone. “We have a program for anyone, [from] adult women [to] students just out of high school, if they want to come and learn English they come here, live on campus and they take classes that are non-degree but focused on learning the English language,” she said. Cowham said many women come for additional practice or instruction before they enter another college. “I am extremely passionate about making students global citizens and connecting the world every day,” Cowham said. “I want to help all of campus see what wonderful resources we have, all the wonderful students that come here from across the world.” Noemy Siles-Alvarado, a Costa Rican student, said she feels the strong sense of community that Cowham has tried to foster for international students at Saint Mary’s. “The professors are really, really good. All the girls are friendly,” she said. “I have enjoyed it, it feels like family.” Siles-Alvarado said she found her role at the writing event amusing. “It’s interesting for me because I’m from Costa Rica. It’s not that amazing and for most people it’s the same name in English as it is in Spanish,” she said. “For the other girls, I think it’s really cool because they can write in their own language.” Siles-Alvarado said she chose to attend the English Language School to improve her grammar before she begins pursuing a pre-medicine degree at Goshen College. Maha Alshahrani, a student from Saudi Arabia, said she chose Saint Mary’s to study among pupils of her own gender and aspires to receive a Master’s degree from Notre Dame. Mayumi Oda and Misa Inaba are both studying abroad from the same college in Japan, which Inaba said was “kind of a sister school to Saint Mary’s.” This semester they live with two American roommates in Le Mans Hall. Oda said as much as they miss home now, when they leave they will miss Saint Mary’s as well. “It’s beautiful to communicate with another country’s people,” Oda said. Contact Rebecca O’Neil at [email protected]last_img read more

48 Hours in Morganton, NC

first_imgDriving along I-40 across North Carolina, many BRO readers may be apt to cruise past one of the most perfect hubs of outdoor adventure in the Blue Ridge and not even realize their unfortunate mistake.  At the eastern gateway to the North Carolina mountains and situated at the midway point between Asheville and Charlotte, the foothills town of Morganton (population: 17,000+) possesses a charming and buzzing downtown that serves as the perfect base camp for exploration. In addition to great restaurants, breweries, parks, shops, and greenways within the town itself, only a drive of a few minutes will place you in the midst of a dizzying array of mountains, cliffs, waterfalls, lakes, rivers, swimming holes, and more multisport options than you can ever imagine. So let’s get started….Day One:Hike Linville Gorge’s Shortoff Mountain Established as one of the first wilderness areas in the U.S. and also reigning as the deepest canyon in the east, the nearly 12,000-acre Linville Gorge Wilderness Area could itself alone provide for a lifetime of adventures. Craggy peaks, cliffs, caves, and the rugged and wild Linville River in the bottom of the gorge offer all levels of challenge to would-be explorers. One of the best and closest gorge hikes from town that also provides constant and epic views is Shortoff Mountain. Pick up a good map at the local outfitter CBS Sports before striking out and head to the end of Wolfpit Rd. off of Hwy.126 to find the trailhead. If you are seeking a guide company for partial-day or multiple-day treks in the gorge, call the good folks at Hike More Adventures.Paddling and mountain biking in Lake James State ParkVery close to the trailhead for Shortoff Mountain along Hwy 126, you will find the Paddy’s Creek area of Lake James State Park. This 6,812 acre lake with over 150 miles of shoreline is a refreshing jewel that offers a perfect sandy beach for swimming, kayak rentals for only $5 and $3 per hour as well as 15 miles of recently designed flowing singletrack perfect for beginner and intermediate mountain bikers. Click here for more info.IMG_2448.JPGLake James State Park – photo by Justin CostnerGreenways, disc golf, adventure playgrounds…and a life-size Ewok village?Back in town the 4.8 mile Catawba River Greenway is a smooth paved trail that hugs the river and eventually terminates in the beautiful 230-acre Catawba Meadows Park. Here you have a range of options including a forested 18-hole disc golf course, a wild adventure ropes playground for the kiddos and best of all…The Beanstalk Journey, an exhilarating blend of ziplines, canopy tour, and ropes course designed and owned by the local and legendary Outward Bound pioneer Mike Fischesser. This amazing and elaborate adventure complex is breathtaking just to look at much less to experience firsthand. Find out more details on the greenway, park, and Beanstalk Journey here.DSC_0078Cycling the Catawba River Greenway – photo courtesy of the City of MorgantonDay Two:Fishing, swimming and hiking in the wild Wilson Creek drainageWilson Creek is born on the high slopes of 5,920 ft. Grandfather Mountain and 20 miles later rushes through a gorgeous granite bedrock gorge. With 25 plus miles of trails and 39,000 acres this wild and rugged playground is a haven for kayakers, anglers, and swimming hole enthusiasts. Although you could easily spend all day here, an 8 mile out and back trip to Harper Creek Falls and Bard Falls will lead you to two of our favorite waterfalls and provide a good taste of what makes this area so special. For more detailed local fishing beta, check out Upper Creek Angler.11304402_10153423756618120_220780415_nBard Falls – photo by Brandon ThrowerBiking and running in the largest State Park in North CarolinaWith over 18,000 acres and 45 miles of trails, South Mountains State Park is the state’s largest in the system and offers a grueling 17-mile mountain biking loop that provides great views from a lot of gnarly forest roads. If you are more interested in exploring on foot, run or hike a nice 3 mile loop to witness one of the park’s gems: the 80 foot High Shoal Falls and the beautifully rock-strewn corridor of Jacob’s Fork River.11091224_10153423758178120_1618443394_nSouth Mountains – photo by Brandon ThrowerFood:Downtown Morganton has the great fortune of possessing two outstanding craft breweries only mere blocks from one another and a number of great dining options that span all budgets. Here are some of our favorites:The Grind Café – The place where all the locals know to go before their big day outdoors. Located downtown on Union St., this café/wine bar/coffee shop offers pastries, quiche, breakfast burritos, smoothies, strong coffee, and much more. Judge’s Riverside – Right off the greenway, hit this place up at lunch for some of the best BBQ and down home cooking around. Even better than the food itself is the setting…expansive patios and decks that offer outside dining while overlooking the Catawba River.Wisteria Southern Gastropub: Fantastic locally-grown, sustainable, and fresh farm-to-table cuisine blending classic Southern fare with new and exciting flavors.Root and Vine: Some of the finest dining in town. You will find French-influenced dishes incorporating seasonal local produce, fresh seafood, and a vast array of beer, wine and cocktails.MoonDog Pizza: The best pie in town! You will find delicious and creative toppings and combinations here at a great value.Libations and Nightlife:Catawba Brewing Company – Although this well-loved operation now has 2 outposts in Asheville, Morganton is where it all began. Their head facility and taproom are still located right in downtown on South Green St. Here you can find their classic line of canned beers of course, but also you can try some of their other excellent and unique offerings like the Mother Trucker Pale and Black Dome Stout.Fonta Flora Brewing – Only a couple of blocks away, this small regional brewery has been causing quite the buzz lately on the craft beer scene. Fonta offers visitors adventurous and delicious rustic ales and saisons while using as many local ingredients as possible.Brown Mountain Bottleworks – A newer community gathering spot. As a hybrid bottle shop, beer, and wine bar, and music venue, this is the kind of place that is perfect for an after-dinner hangout and nightcap.brownmtBrown Mountain Bottleworks: photo by John S. PayneLodging: A wide range of lodging options exist, including private and state park camping, lakeside cabins, and in-town hotels & inns. The Burke County TDA is the best clearinghouse of choices, but here are two different options on opposite ends of the spectrum:Camp Lake James – An exclusive lakeside community and adventure center that offers 2 unique cabins with all the amenities and privileges of the community.Steele Creek Park – A family campground complete with a camp store and a natural swimming beach with water slides and diving boards.Upcoming Events Not To Miss:State of Origin Craft Beer Festival: An extremely unique beer festival focusing on the flora and fauna of the state. All 23 of the participating North Carolina breweries are required to bring a beer that was brewed using ingredients grown in North Carolina. June 13 in the Courthouse SquareRed, White, and Bluegrass Festival: This much loved multi-day event is in its 12th year and features a holiday packed with some of the most acclaimed bluegrass acts in the business. A sampling of this year includes The Del McCoury Band, Blue Highway, Town Mountain, Seldom Scene, Balsam Range, Mountain Heart, and many more. July 1st–4th at Catawba Meadows Park.Native Knowledge:“Morganton is amazing because it is such a good jumping off point to access a plethora of outdoor activities. It offers something for almost all outdoor pursuits and those offerings are top of the class experiences.  Combine that with two amazing breweries a few blocks from each other and great grub and it is no wonder that most of my adventures begin and end here.”  – Brandon Thrower,  BRO trail running athlete and educator“Morganton combines all the comforts of a small mountain town with truly world-class outdoor opportunities and a unique cultural collision of various ethnic and social groups… it is the most fascinating place I’ve ever lived, and its appeal continues to grow every year I’m here.” Seth Hawkins, Owner of Hawk Ventures and Vertical Medicine ResourcesRelated:last_img read more

FA panel to discuss Scudamore case

first_img The FA’s inclusion advisory board (IAB), chaired by independent FA board member Heather Rabbatts, will look into Scudamore’s emails and the Premier League’s process in handling the case. Scudamore spoke of his “sincere contrition” after the clubs decided against any further disciplinary action and said he would hold a series of meetings across football’s administration to reassure them of his commitment to promote women in the game. Ouseley said: “The Prime Minister stated earlier today that he wouldn’t tolerate these types of comments in his own cabinet. A decision like this and the way it was made reflects the dominance, strength and culture at the very top of the football pyramid. Ouseley also claimed the Premier League’s process in dealing with Scudamore was “flawed”. Ouseley said: “Richard Scudamore is one of the most successful and powerful men in world football. The outcome of the proceedings into the revealed emails and their contents leaves the status quo intact. “The process adopted by the Premier League is a flawed one and there was only ever going to be one outcome. It is incumbent on the Premier League to put in place a proper, objective, fair and independent process for dealing with such important matters in future.” The row has gone to the very top of British politics, however, with Prime Minister David Cameron saying the sexist emails highlighted the need for people to treat others with respect. Cameron said he had not personally read the messages sent by Scudamore, but that high standards had to be maintained. Asked if a minister would survive in their job if they admitted sexist behaviour, he told BBC Radio 5 Live: “I don’t think they would. “I have to be careful what I say because I haven’t seen these specific emails, but…we have to set and keep high standards in politics. “I have tried to enforce that in my own party.” He added: “I haven’t actually seen the emails myself but obviously people should treat everybody else with respect.” West Ham vice-chairman Karren Brady insisted Scudamore “is categorically not sexist”, but said she was disappointed to learn of the emails. The head of anti-discrimination group Kick It Out, Lord Herman Ouseley, said Cameron’s statements showed the need for change in football. A Football Association equality panel will meet on Tuesday to discuss the Richard Scudamore sexist emails case after the Premier League chief executive received full backing from clubs. Press Associationlast_img read more

Stocco injures ankle before returning

first_imgYANA PASKOVA/Herald photoThe University of Wisconsin football team held its 10th spring practice late Wednesday night, and like the rest of Madison, the team took advantage of the delightful weather and held practice outside in Camp Randall, under the lights.While the climate was a dream, the workout looked to have turned into a nightmare when senior quarterback John Stocco dropped back awkwardly and fell to the turf clutching his right ankle, the same ankle he had to have re-taped during practice last Friday, April 7.After laying on the ground for a minute or so Stocco gingerly got up and left the practice area, before laying on the ground again to have the ankle taped. To the relief of players and coaches, Stocco was back in for his next set of repetitions about five minutes later.”He’s been battling through that,” Bielema said. “He rolled it I think towards the latter part of winter conditioning.”Bielema later joked about the condition of his star quarterback, one of only three offensive starters returning for last season’s squad.”It was funny, I was going to say something to him before practice because he wasn’t taped and he is usually taped on that one ankle,” Bielema said, with a wry grin. “But he was taped after that fall.”Stocco didn’t seem to show any ill effects from the injury, throwing the ball well in the second half of practice, though he did pace and stretch while waiting for his next set of reps.In other notes, redshirt freshman Jaevery McFadden, who had been working out of tight end thus far in spring, has switched positions and is now practicing with the linebackers playing the strong side, or “Sam” linebacker spot. Bielema noted that he had recruited McFadden as a linebacker and that McFadden wasn’t getting enough reps at tight end.Speaking of which, the tight end position still looks as murky as every two-thirds through spring drills, as sophomores Travis Beckum and Sean Lewis, along with junior Andy Crooks, continue to battle for position supremacy. Crooks looks like the best blocker, while Beckum seems to be the most dynamic athlete and looks to have the best hands.”By just pure body competition obviously [Crooks] is going to be better on the line of scrimmage that [Beckum], who is a mover and a shaker,” Bielema said. “I thought on Saturday they both moved exceptionally well.”Junior Danny Kaye also took snaps at center for the first time during practices, as the Badgers try and improve depth at the position which looks to be pretty thin behind projected starter Marcus Coleman who has had an up and down spring, thus far.Wide out Luke Swan, made his return to practice Wednesday after missing much of the spring with an undisclosed injury. He did not participate fully.After practice, the team ran sprints for the first time, as punishment for off the field issues. Fourteen players ran double, including running back Jamil Walker, cornerback Jack Ikegwuonu, third-string quarterback Dustin Sherer and even defensive end Matt Shaughnessy, who is cleared to do little more than run during the spring.”I told them we weren’t going to run in spring ball unless we had to, and today we had to,” Bielema said. “It was a team ownership [off the field] issue, so everyone took ownership.”last_img read more

Baseball looks to recover against Cal State Fullerton

first_imgNo. 13 USC (30-11) looks to regain momentum tonight at Dedeaux Field against the Cal State Fullerton Titans after dropping a disappointing Pac-12 series last weekend against Oregon State.The Trojans came out with a punch over the weekend behind a strong start from junior Tyler Gilbert, who threw seven complete innings of  four-hit baseball. USC delivered an all-around impressive offensive showing, defeating Oregon State 11-3 during game one of the series.In game two, the Trojans managed a comeback from a 2-0 deficit during the top of the sixth, but a lead off walk in the bottom of the ninth proved deadly for the Trojans, after pinch hitter Billy King singled through the right side to bring in the game-winning run from third.The Trojans once again had trouble with consistency on the mound during game three, allowing Oregon State to win the game 9-6. Despite the threat of a major comeback in the top of the ninth as they attempted to crawl out of a 9-4 deficit, they could only produce two more runs in the loss, falling 2-1 in the series.Tonight, USC looks to shake off last week and start fresh against the visiting Cal State Fullerton Titans. Currently, the Titans hold a 22-20 overall record, an 8-4 record in the Big West Conference and an 8-12 record on the road.Cal State Fullerton is highlighted at the plate by junior outfielders Josh Vargas, David Olmedo-Barrera and Tyler Steib. The Titans, similarly to the Trojans, have recently transitioned from a very young team to one more experienced, boasting a starting roster of almost all juniors. The Titans are led behind the mound by junior Thomas Eshelman with a 2.10 ERA and junior Justin Garza with a 3.56 ERA.The Trojans and Titans last met on Feb. 17 in Fullerton where the Trojans came away with the game 6-4. The then-No. 25 Titans were unable to halt the Trojans’ hot streak during the fourth inning as the team put up four more runs to put the game out of reach. Sophomore Bernardo Flores got the win, entering in relief in the fifth to throw three innings, striking out four batters while allowing two runs on three hits with no walks.Tonight, the Titans will enter the game following a 2-1 series victory at home against UC Irvine.Reviewing the numbers, USC currently maintains a .297 team batting average compared to CSFU’s .259 average. USC has a 3.13 team ERA, and CSFU holds a 3.38 team ERA.Statistics aside, USC head coach Dan Hubbs believes the key to tomorrow night’s game remains the same as all season: overall game consistency.“It’s the same as it always is with us; we need to pitch well and hit well every time we enter a game,” Hubbs said. “I think we pitched extremely well last Friday and pretty well on Saturday. On Sunday we pitched really poorly, and we faced the consequences of that. We just need to play well [tonight] and get back in our rhythm. If we can do that we’ll be in the position to win. We just need to play our game.”In terms of pitching, the Trojan team has recently had trouble finishing off batters and putting men on bases because of walks, oftentimes to lead off innings. Hubbs believes that minimizing the number of walks will be key to playing clean defense in tonight’s match.“I think we really need to focus on cutting down on our walks, especially from the guys in the pen but also our starters as well,” Hubbs said. “Some guys will get some work in tomorrow so hopefully that will help straighten them out for the weekend because we can’t keep giving out too many.”Working in USC’s favor is the fact that the team tends to play very well at home. The Trojans currently hold an 18-6 record at home, a factor that Hubbs hopes will positively influence the team in tonight’s game.“We always tend to play really well at home, which will hopefully really work in our favor tonight,” Hubbs said. “That being said, we’re going to need to stop them early in order for that to remain an advantage. We need to get ourselves on the board early in the game and then extend. We’ve done a good job of that when we’re at home and we tend to pitch much better at home. I don’t expect tomorrow to be any different.”The Trojans will host the Titans tonight at 6 p.m. PST at Dedeaux Field. The game will also be broadcast on the Pac-12 Network.last_img read more