FA panel to discuss Scudamore case

first_img The FA’s inclusion advisory board (IAB), chaired by independent FA board member Heather Rabbatts, will look into Scudamore’s emails and the Premier League’s process in handling the case. Scudamore spoke of his “sincere contrition” after the clubs decided against any further disciplinary action and said he would hold a series of meetings across football’s administration to reassure them of his commitment to promote women in the game. Ouseley said: “The Prime Minister stated earlier today that he wouldn’t tolerate these types of comments in his own cabinet. A decision like this and the way it was made reflects the dominance, strength and culture at the very top of the football pyramid. Ouseley also claimed the Premier League’s process in dealing with Scudamore was “flawed”. Ouseley said: “Richard Scudamore is one of the most successful and powerful men in world football. The outcome of the proceedings into the revealed emails and their contents leaves the status quo intact. “The process adopted by the Premier League is a flawed one and there was only ever going to be one outcome. It is incumbent on the Premier League to put in place a proper, objective, fair and independent process for dealing with such important matters in future.” The row has gone to the very top of British politics, however, with Prime Minister David Cameron saying the sexist emails highlighted the need for people to treat others with respect. Cameron said he had not personally read the messages sent by Scudamore, but that high standards had to be maintained. Asked if a minister would survive in their job if they admitted sexist behaviour, he told BBC Radio 5 Live: “I don’t think they would. “I have to be careful what I say because I haven’t seen these specific emails, but…we have to set and keep high standards in politics. “I have tried to enforce that in my own party.” He added: “I haven’t actually seen the emails myself but obviously people should treat everybody else with respect.” West Ham vice-chairman Karren Brady insisted Scudamore “is categorically not sexist”, but said she was disappointed to learn of the emails. The head of anti-discrimination group Kick It Out, Lord Herman Ouseley, said Cameron’s statements showed the need for change in football. A Football Association equality panel will meet on Tuesday to discuss the Richard Scudamore sexist emails case after the Premier League chief executive received full backing from clubs. Press Associationlast_img read more

Friday is deadline for requesting absentee ballot for Primary

first_imgDES MOINES — Almost 400,000 Iowans have asked for an absentee ballot for the June 2nd Primary and early voting is likely to set an all-time record for a primary.“People have listened and they heard. They got the message: let’s vote safe, let’s vote from home right now,” says Secretary of State Paul Pate, the state’s commissioner of elections.His office mailed absentee ballot request forms to every registered Iowa voter, encouraging Iowans to ask their county auditor for the vote-by-mail option rather than in-person voting on Primary Day.“I think the pandemic has put a much stronger emphasis on voting,” Pate says. “People are at home. They’re paying attention to what the government’s doing.”The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot is Friday at 5 p.m. and officials suggest any request sent through the U.S. Postal Service be mailed today to ensure it gets to the county auditor on time. Polk County Auditor Jamie Fitzgerald says in Iowa’s largest county, an average of about 9000 people typically ask for an absentee ballot for a Primary. His office has already processed 10,000 “and we still have 54,000 requests,” Fitzgerald says.While there will be in-person voting available on Primary day, election officials like Fitzgerald are encouraging Iowans to use this vote-at-home option.“We are in the pandemic,” Fitzgerald says. “You have people now that are voting safely, making sure they don’t spread the virus.”Pate says Iowa National Guard soldiers distributed personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies to county auditors last week that will be used by poll workers at precinct voting sites on June 2nd. Each voting booth will be cleaned between uses. Some counties plan to offer voters gloves. In Polk County, each Primary Day voter will be given their own pen to use and take with them after they cast their ballot.“We want Iowans to be able to vote,” Pate says. “We want them to be able to vote safely and we want our poll workers to be safe.”Fitzgerald says in Polk County — and most others — the number of precincts have been reduced, to ensure there’s enough space inside for social distancing and to make sure there are enough poll workers.“I don’t want to wake up like they did in Wisconsin and find out that 400 people have quit, so we’re constantly training,” Fitzgerald says. “We’re constantly talking to our poll workers.”Pate predicts as many as 70 percent of ballots cast in the June Primary, however, will be absentee ballots. He says Iowans can track their absentee ballots on www.voterready.iowa.gov.“When the auditor’s office receives your request i’ll show that. It’ll show when the auditor sends (the absentee ballot) out. It’ll show when it got back to the auditor’s office, Pate says, “so you know it got there.”The two election officials made their comments this weekend on the “Iowa Press” program on Iowa PBS. They both are urging Iowans voting by mail to avoid a common mistake — and remember to sign and date the ballot.last_img read more