Day Motor Sports delivers awards to IMCA special events drivers in all eight divisions

first_imgTYLER, Texas – Drivers in all eight IMCA divisions chase awards from Day Motor Sports for a 14th season in 2017.Top five finishers in up to 80 designated specials receive $50 gift cards from the Tyler, Texas, circle track warehouse.Those gift cards will be mailed from the IMCA home office within a week after official race results are received.Day also gives gift cards to competitors at the IMCA Speedway Motors Super Nationals fueled by Casey’s and the IMCA Sprint Car Nationals again in September.“Day Motor Sports, your circle track warehouse, is proud to be a sponsor for the 2017 racing season and looks forward to providing IMCA racers the finest quality parts at the lowest prices,” said Company President Joe Francis. “Look for our parts trailer visiting our local IMCA tracks as well as at the Super Nationals in Boone. Also, come by and see us or call for a new 2017 catalog.”Information about the wide range of Day high performance products, safety gear, shop and pit equipment is available by calling 800 543-6238, at the www.daymotorsports.com website and on Facebook.“The support from racers for the Day Motor Sports program has been tremendous and that has allowed us to renew this program with Day in 2017,” IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder said. “We appreciate their support of IMCA racing in all divisions across the country and look forward to an outstanding season.”last_img read more

Kotoko 0-0 Olympics: Yaw Acheampong defends tactics in Kumasi draw

first_imgGreat Olympics coach, Yaw Acheampong, has expressed satisfaction at his side’s 0-0 away result with Asante Kotoko on Sunday.The Porcupine Warriors despite dominating possession but the visitors, who paraded a very experienced side including ex-Black Stars trio Godwin Attram, Dan Quaye and evergreen goalkeeper Richard Kingson.Olympics defended well to play out a draw with Kingson keeping a third clean sheet since returning to his boyhood club.“I am a defensive-minded coach and when I see that things are changing, I have to play to have at least a point which is better than none,” Acheampong told supersport.com after the game in Kumasi.“Our target is, if we have a goal, we kill the game so when the game reaches a certain stage that we see that things are getting difficult, we fight to take a point home.”Our tactics was to play behind the ball and then counter when in possession. We had a couple of chances that we should have made use of but we failed to score. That’s football. We are okay with the result.” Olympics increased their points tally to 19 but dropped from sixth to ninth position on the First Capital Plus Premier League log.–Follow Gary on Twitter: @garyalsmithlast_img read more

Tommy John, Jamie Moyer weigh in: Can anyone play a quarter century in MLB?

first_imgConsidering advancements in medicine, coaching techniques, and the emergence of biomechanical data, this seems counterintuitive. Yet the reason behind the vanishing over-40 pitcher is no secret. By emphasizing velocity, baseball’s prevailing game theory has turned pitching from a series of distance races into a series of sprints. The well-paced marathoner – the master of the complete game – has become less valuable than ever.John knows this. He doesn’t like it.Pitchers, he said, “can try to go on and pitch longer, or pitch the way the general managers and the techies want them to pitch – the Yalies, the Harvard guys and all that.”“The owner of the team looks at the bottom line: did we make money this year? You go from there,” John continued. “I’m a bottom-line pitching guy. I want to see wins. I don’t watch baseball anymore. It’s not the same game I played. The game’s changed. The players in it have changed. … I don’t think they appreciate the game and respect the game for what they’ve got. They’ve got a rare talent. They don’t respect it. I don’t like to see it.”Moyer, who retired midway through the 2012 season, holds a more agnostic view.“The sabermetrics have changed the game,” he said. “I’m not affiliated with an organization and I don’t know a lot about it. I’m not here to condone it, but it’s different. There’s a way for all of it to work together.”Unlike John, Moyer said he gladly watches baseball at home.“What the Milwaukee Brewers did last season was fantastic,” he said. “The starting rotation was probably their weakest link. The bullpen was one of their stronger links. I thought (Manager) Craig Counsell did a fabulous job with what he had. When you get into the playoffs, you don’t need five starters; you only need three or possibly a fourth. Their bullpen was so strong, so dominant, and it got them almost to the World Series. They did it a lot differently than how we’re used to seeing baseball being played.”By 2018 standards, John and Moyer were extreme finesse pitchers. They concede their careers are products of a bygone era, the relics of a dying trend. While it’s accurate to ascribe their longevity to when and how they pitched, it’s unfair to their perseverance.John wasn’t ready to retire in May 1989. After he was released by the Yankees, John said he tried hooking on with a handful of teams to no avail. Not once, he said, did he look around and wonder what he was doing on the same field as men half his age.“I loved playing baseball. That’s why I kept playing it as long as I did,” John said. “I loved competing. I loved it. That’s why I had Tommy John surgery. I asked Dr. Jobe if I needed it. He said, ‘no you don’t need it, but if you don’t have it you’ll never pitch again.’ It wasn’t that I was making $15 million. I wanted to pitch.”Once, midway through a disappointing 2006 season, Moyer said he resolved to retire at year’s end. That changed when he was traded by the Seattle Mariners to the Philadelphia Phillies in August. He gladly waived his 10-and-5 rights to accommodate the trade to a contending team.Four years later, weeks away from his 48th birthday, Moyer faced another dilemma. He was attempting to rehab his ailing elbow with the Leones del Escogido of the Dominican Winter League. In his third appearance, Moyer said he completely tore the ulnar collateral ligament and flexor pronator tendon in his left elbow.When the Phillies’ team physician offered a recommendation of surgery, Moyer said he went to the late Dr. Lewis Yocum for a second opinion.Related Articles Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros “(Yocum) said, ‘look, you tore this thing pretty good’,” Moyer recalled. “‘I can fix it just so you can do some simple things for the rest of your life – golf, play catch – or I can fix it like I would if you’re 25, 30 years old. You’re probably not going to pitch again.’ I said, really? I took that as a challenge.“For me, it was the challenge of getting through the surgery. I only wanted to play if I felt like I could contribute.”Moyer did contribute again, finishing his major league career with the Colorado Rockies at age 49. In his third-to-last start, Moyer tapped a weak grounder between the mound and first base, and eluded the tag of Arizona Diamondbacks first baseman Paul Goldschmidt for a single. Two runs scored on the play, making Moyer the oldest player ever with an RBI.It’s a record he might never concede.“If you look at pitching these days, everything is max effort,” he said. “Look at the younger generations – high school, college, minor leagues, everybody’s trying to light up a radar gun, throw 100 mph. Our bodies aren’t made to perform in this game as a pitcher at max effort.”Not a 49-year-old’s body. Major League Baseball is no country for middle-aged men. Dodgers lose a wild game to the Giants in 11 innings Dodgers’ Will Smith: ‘I feel like it’s been five years’ since his 2019 debut Tommy John is driving south on Interstate 5, somewhere between Bakersfield and the Bay Area, when his cell phone reception cuts out. Our call drops a moment later. I call him back. “This is Gavin Newsom,” says the voice on the other end. I have reached Tommy John’s sense of humor.As a rookie with the 1963 Cleveland Indians, John was teammates with World War II veteran Early Wynn. When John was released by the New York Yankees on May 30, 1989, the Yankees purchased Deion Sanders’ contract from Triple-A the next day. One might say his 26-year career started early and ended in prime time. In so doing, John persevered longer than all but two major league players: Nolan Ryan and 19th-century pioneer Cap Anson. That excludes the 1975 season John missed while recovering from a surgery that now bears his name.I called John because, maybe it’s just me, but it seems his longevity might never be surpassed. The math doesn’t look good. Bartolo Colon, 45, would need to pitch in each of the next five seasons to get to 26. Outfielder Ichiro Suzuki counted off his 27th season of professional baseball last year in Seattle, but only if you include his first nine seasons in Japan.I caught John lamenting the limits of GSM cells while tumbling down the Interstate en route to humble acclaim. The Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation will honor John and 25-year veteran Jamie Moyer with Iron Man awards Saturday at its annual “In The Spirit Of The Game” dinner in Beverly Hills. This token of recognition might too be meager. We might not see another 46-year-old in MLB.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Harvard-Westlake alum Lucas Giolito throws no-hitter for White Sox Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros “You see ’em all the time,” John said, pausing for effect. “They’re coaches and managers.”Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.“On the field? No,” he continued. “The guys who run the game now are more into the metrics, the spin on your fastball and curveball, the velocity, and as you get older it’s a fact: you start losing speed on your fastball. You just can’t do it. Jamie Moyer, he and I pitched the same way. (Tom) Glavine, (Greg) Maddux, we pitched the same way. You can’t compete at 46 throwing 100-mph fastballs. I could’ve if they let me use steroids.”Major league players lost their hall pass to the PED aisle in increments over a decade. Pitchers now strategically exchange the complete game for shorter starts featuring faster fastballs – a pitch that averaged 92.8 mph last season. Free agents are aging out of the market ever earlier. Add it up, and it’s easy to understand why the average MLB player age is trending younger.The irony of all this isn’t lost on John. He is less famous for his 26 seasons and 288 wins than a landmark medical procedure. If Dr. Frank Jobe had not replaced the ulnar collateral ligament in John’s left elbow in September 1974, he might have been forced to retire at age 32. Tommy John surgery carried the promise of extending pitchers’ careers – it has – but what John and Moyer accomplished looks less and less likely by the day.Hope for another 26-year career dies in the numbers. Toss out the period in which baseball treated standard drug tests as optional, and the distribution of seasons featuring pitchers over age 40 looks almost random. MLB’s kindest year to over-40 pitchers was 2007. That year, 18 men pitched past their 40th birthday. Next on the list is 2006, with 15. The 1945 season, a year when World War II forced younger men into military service, featured 14 over-40 pitchers. Next is 2008. In fact, of the top 30 seasons on this list, only one (2017) took place after regular-season HGH blood tests were introduced in 2013.last_img read more

Meghan Kelly: CNN’s Don Lemon “Pretends to be Objective”

first_imgFormer Fox News and NBC News anchor Megyn Kelly and CNN anchor are in a war of words over objectivity and racism. Kelly ripped Don Lemon in a tweet that CNN “pretends he is an objective news anchor.” In her tweet, Kelly linked to a story that included Lemon’s criticisms of the way President Trump conducts the White House coronavirus task force briefings.“CNN still pretends he is an objective news anchor (yeah, sure) while the [mainstream media] recoils in horror at the bias of Fox/[One America News], etc. Who do they think they’re kidding?” Kelly tweeted. Lemon, who has served as a moderator for several of the network’s town hall events during the 2019-2020 Democratic primary season and is listed as an anchor on his CNN.com bio, said on “CNN Tonight” on Monday that he feels like Howard Beale, the character from the satiric 1976 movie “Network,” after watching the president’s task force briefings.“I have to be honest with you. For the last couple of weeks, when I walk into this building and I get in front of this camera, I swear I feel like I’m in the movie ‘Network.’ I feel like Howard Beale. Americans are mad as hell. What are you going to — how much more can Americans take?”“Every single day berating people, lying,” Lemon said of Trump. “How much more — How many people have to die?”https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/tv/news/megyn-kelly-don-lemon-twitter-fox-news-trump-a9452976.html?jwsource=clKelly’s perspective on Lemon quickly trended Tuesday as a top topic on Twitter.Twitter users have also brought up remarks made by Kelly on her later Today talk show, in which she questioned why wearing blackface as part of a Halloween costume wasn’t acceptable.Kelly apologised for her comments but was dropped by NBC in October 2018 following the controversy.Lemon reacted to Kelly’s remarks on Chris Cuomo’s CNN show, telling his colleague at the time: “Megyn is 47 years old, she’s our age. There has never been a time in that 47 years that blackface has been acceptable.” Kelly was a longtime Fox News host before joining NBC News in 2017.last_img read more

Bike Lanes Roll Out In Three Towns

first_imgBy John Burton Cyclists and runners now have a designated lane in portions of Fair Haven, Little Silver and Rumson, which local officials hope will be the beginning of a longer network of bike lanes. Contractors late last week and this week striped recently milled and repaved portions of Rumson and Ridge roads running through the three communities. As part of that work, the contractor, Traffic Lines, Inc., Farmingdale, is stenciling a cyclist silhouette – in traffic engineering lingo called a “sharrow,” a shared lane designation providing space for cyclists and those on foot – along the roadway.According to Monmouth County Freeholder Thomas Arnone, the freeholder board’s liaison for public works and engineering, the work along these county roads will continue through the week and will include accompanying bike lane signage.This is a major step forward for Fair Haven Mayor Benjamin Lucarelli and Rumson Mayor John Ekdahl, who advocated for the bike lanes and worked with county officials to win their support.“I think at the end of the day the idea is good,” to have these lanes, said Lucarelli.Since the sharrows first began being installed, Lucarelli said “ten people have come up to me to say thank you…They’re going out of their way to say thank you.”Lucarelli added, “What is really gratifying is seeing people use it.” With the unseasonably warm weather last weekend, he observed cyclists pedaling in the lanes. And with the formal designation “It raises awareness with cars and drivers,” he said.With the county’s plan to resurface those roadways early this fall, Lucarelli and Ekdahl saw an opportunity to get county government to allow the roads’ shoulders to have the official designation.The communities struck an agreement with county officials to equally share the engineering and installation cost.Workers this week installed bicycle lane stenciling on Rumson and Ridge roads through portions of Fair Haven, Rumson and Little Silver. Local officials hope this will be the first in an ongoing effort establishing a Two River bike lane connecting a number of local communities. Photo: John BurtonLucarelli said Fair Haven budgeted $49,000 for its share.On average, he explained, it costs roughly $1,800 to stripe a mile and about $285 for each sharrow, with signage an additional expense.Lucarelli is a cycling enthusiast who has been advocating for a Two River bike lane connecting from Red Bank east through the Rumson peninsula, on to Sea Bright and Ocean Avenue/state Highway 36. It would run through Monmouth Beach and Oceanport and loop back around to the Red Bank border. His support also had a personal and profound resonance, given Fair Haven Borough Councilman Jerome Koch was killed a little over a year ago when struck by a vehicle while out cycling in the borough.The state Department of Transportation will install bike lanes on Ocean Avenue throughout Sea Bright when it repaves the roadway in the near future, Sea Bright Mayor Dina Long said previously.The Two River Council of Mayors, an informal collection of 13 municipalities, which includes Rumson, Fair Haven and Little Silver, threw its support behind the efforts.Lucarelli and supporters see their effort as intended to encourage people to get out of their vehicles and take to bikes for transportation, recreation and for health and environmental considerations. That is the trend through much of the country and abroad, Lucarelli said in the past. But cyclists are entitled to the designated lanes for the safety of all using the roadways, advocates have stressed.Indeed, there is a considerable body of research that indicates that clearly marked lanes have a traffic calming effect. In general terms, even when no cyclists are present, drivers instinctively slow down, and cyclists, when on the roads, tend to stay in the lanes.Of those who have approached Lucarelli, “I think they all realize our leafy suburb is ripe for this,” he said.The local officials approached the county freeholders about supporting the project for the county roads, hoping the county would cover the expense. County officials were initially resistant to the idea, citing costs, liability and the complexities of having it cross multiple municipalities. Finally, both sides hammered out an agreement to share expenses, supported by Arnone who secured the remainder of freeholders’ support.“The county appreciates the commitment by the boroughs of Fair Haven, Little Silver and Rumson to advance the bicycle routes by committing to the engineering design and funding on the county roads in their towns,” Arnone said in an email response.Fair Haven resident Gail O’Reilly, a volunteer working with Lucarelli on garnering support for the lanes, said this week of this development, “I think it’s profoundly significant now that area residents have an option to travel more safely through and between our communities.”Cycling has yet to become the norm for most people’s transportation, O’Reilly acknowledged. “But it shouldn’t be the exception.”“And that’s one of our goals,” she said of the group working with Lucarelli, “to make it more readily available.”Bike lanes, under federal and state guidelines, are expected to be from 4-to-5 feet wide, depending on whether there is curbing on the road. Sharrows should be installed every quarter- to half-mile, and at every intersection, accompanied by signage.The lines and stenciling are done with a thermo-plastic compound that’s expected to last approximately three years, said Dave Cuje, a Traffic Lines, Inc. foreman overseeing their installation this week.– By John Burton | The Two River Times John Burton can be reached at [email protected]last_img read more

Prepping for Summer Salads

first_imgBy Gretchen Van BenthuysenLocal garden centers have begun stocking flats of lettuce and vegetables that do well in cool weather and taste so delicious when you cut, wash and serve them all within a few minutes.Four-packs of Red Sail and Iceberg lettuce, escarole, kale, Bright Lights Swiss chard and spinach, for example, could be found at Sickles Market, 1 Harrison Ave, Little Silver and planted in pots by the end of March.Although they don’t mind cool weather, when the temperature starts flirting with 32 degrees it’s time to cover your plants or risk losing them. With our ever-changing weather these days you’re often wearing boots and the next flip-flops.In that case you may need to bring pots inside – a garage usually is fine – and cover plants in the ground. A floating row cover is designed to trap heat inside during the day so at night there’s enough warmth to prevent wilted mush. Burpee sells a 72-inch by 50-feet row cover for $20. It also sells the TunLcover which is 18-feet long, consists of a 2-layer UV protected cover with thick gauge wire hoops every two feet that stick into the ground and extends like an accordion.It is designed to act like a greenhouse protecting plants from frost, wind chill and garden pests and sells for $25. Search the internet for more products or visit area garden centers for other options.If you are really caught off guard, use layers of newspapers or a shower curtain liner weighted down around the edges with rocks, bricks or whatever you can find. Remove the covering during the day when temperatures climb. A sheltered area and southern exposure also are helpful. Besides patience, gardeners need to cultivate a willingness to do what it tales to adapt to the weather.Lettuces and mixed greens do best in temperatures between 45 and 80 degrees. Once the heat and humidity hit in July plants generally bolt, which means they send up flower stalks to produce seeds and develop a bitter taste. It’s time to pull them up at this point.But before then, extend your growing season by either harvesting the plants’ outer leaves or cut just above the growing point in the cut-and-come-again method and see new growth emerge for your salad bowl.Flashy Trout Back lettuce is an Austrian heirloom variety that dates to 1793. Allegedly its ancestors can be traced back to the kitchen gardens of ancient Mesopotamia.Most garden centers buy from suppliers that specialize in mass production and your choices at the local level will be limited. The greens will taste great, but probably you won’t find many heirloom varieties such as Flashy Trout Back. It looks good and tastes great but you have to start it from seed, which is not all that hard to do.If you grow and harvest lettuce this spring you will want to do it again in the fall, but you won’t be able to find any transplants in the garden centers then. They all are focused on pumpkins and mums after Labor Day.So take advantage now of materials on sale in stores and online for seed starter kits. Seedlings need two- to three-inches of soil so you can grow them in yogurt or paper cups, but trays are more convenient.If you plan to start from seed this spring inside — it’s not too late —you will need lights designed for that purpose. It’s the best way to guarantee consistent, abundant light. Set the timer for 15 hours a day and water regularly. Start with the light about two inches above the seeds and raise it as the seedlings grow. If the light is too far away the seedlings will stretch toward it becoming leggy and weak. Let the top of the soil dry out a bit between watering. Soggy is not good.Do not use just any soil. Seedlings, like babies, are tender and need extra special food — a sterile seed starting mix that will ensure healthy, disease-free seedlings. Jiffy’s Natural & Organic Seed Starting Mix works great. Follow the directions — do not skip the pre-moistened part — and do not, use soil from your garden. You will be doomed to seedling failure.You will need to use a liquid fertilizer after a couple of weeks. Lettuce loves nitrogen so choose a well-balanced fertilizer with equal parts nitrogen, potassium and phosphate such as 10-10-10 or 5-5-5 mixtures, which all garden centers carry. Ask for help if you are confused.You could have the somewhat pedestrian garden center varieties with Burpee seedlings — Looseleaf Blend lettuce (Black Seeded Simpson, Lollo Rossa, Red Salad Bowl and Royal Oak Leaf); heirloom Tom Thumb, Four Seasons and Heatwave Blend lettuces; Flashy Trout Back, and A La Carte Spinach under a light inside.When it’s time to transfer indoor seedlings outside they need to be hardened off. Here’s where a cold frame comes in handy. It also helps extend your growing season. Pampered plants need to be introduced slowly to wind and intense sun. You can also put the plants outside for a few hours at a time, or move to the shade before bringing them back inside for a week or so.To learn more about spring gardening, the Rutgers Master Gardeners of Monmouth County, 4000 Kozlowski Road, Freehold, are hosting “Celebrate Spring! … a Symposium” from 8:45 to 4 p.m. April 16. Topics include container gardens, spring lawn maintenance, organic vegetable gardening, perennials, butterfly/pollinator gardening, and raised bed gardening. Best of all — it’s free.To register, or for more information, call 732-303-7614 or visit www.visitmonmouth.com.More From The Two River Times Home & Garden Special SectionApril 14, 2016 Two River TimesHummingbird Mania by David SaidnawayPrepping For Summer Salads by Gretchen Van BenthuysenHow to Guarantee Your Garden Starts Off On the Right FootClippings: Gardening Events Around TownAtlantic Highlands Looking for Favorite Treeslast_img read more