Saint Mary’s students reflect on Semester at Sea

first_imgSaint Mary’s seniors Madison Marshall and Clare Theisen, along with junior Maura Newell, made waves when they participated in the Semester at Sea program, which is not directly offered through Saint Mary’s, but which the students managed to incorporate into their experiences at the College.Semester at Sea is a 100-day program that allows students to experience the cultures of ten or more countries in only one semester of school. Students travel on a boat that is slightly smaller than a cruise ship to get from international destination to destination — the destinations change slightly each semester. Newell, who studied abroad last semester, said she attended classes with fellow students from around the world while on the boat. “We would have class every day we were at sea, so we didn’t really didn’t have weekends,” she said. “The longest we were sailing was 12 days when we went from Hawaii to Japan, and the shortest was two days when we went from Japan to China.”Newell said as long as students discuss their plans to study abroad with the Registrar Office, their classes can count toward Saint Mary’s credits. Classes cover a range of topics, such as economics, art history, world diplomacy, photography, literature, anthropology, oceanography and religion, she said.“When we’re on the ship, we study what country we’re going to,” she said. “So in my business economics class, we would talk about the economy of whichever country we were traveling to.”Students have the option to either pay extra to take classes once the boat docks in a country or to travel independently. However, even if the students opt to travel independently, they must attend at least one field lab while they’re visiting a country. Newell said her art history class met with an artist in Vietnam. Professors, like students, must also apply to teach for a semester on the ship. Marshall, a marketing major who studied abroad in the fall of 2015, said most of the professors were from the U.S., but some were from other countries. “All of the professors were from prestigious schools,” she said. “I had professors from Yale and Harvard, which is something I wouldn’t be able to experience anywhere else.”Newell said the community feeling on the ship was unique because of how close the students live to the faculty.“When you’re living in close quarters with everyone, you get to know everyone really well,”  Newell said. “You don’t just see your teachers in a professional setting. You see them all over the ship, even walking down the hall in their PJs.”The ship was equipped with a gym, pool, a theater where students could attend talks or performances and multiple dining halls. Marshall said the ship was similar to the one in the movie Titanic.“We were lucky that our boat was a new boat,” Marshall said. “It had a Titanic vibe. Everything was elegant and decorative and kind of old-fashioned.”The ship also had no phone service and no internet for the students. Theisen, who studied abroad with Marshall, said this aspect of the ship made the experience more authentic.“Because you couldn’t rely on your phone, you were forced to listen and learn.” Theisen said. “When we went abroad, it was around the time of the Paris attacks, so it was interesting to see people’s perspectives from around the world. I grew and learned so much from the people around me.”Marshall said she made some of her best friends on the ship. “The relationships I made with other students on the ship aren’t even comparable with any of my other relationships,” Marshall said. “You build this inseparable bond with the people you travel with, even though they start out to be complete strangers.”Newell was the only Saint Mary’s student on her voyage, but she said it was worth pushing herself outside of her comfort zone for the experience. One of the greatest experiences she had was on her trip to Myanmar, she said. “We took a hot air balloon and flew over a bunch of pagodas and temples at sunrise,” Newell said. “I went to a little town that most tourists don’t go to. We met a family while we were there, and we stayed with them over night. It was such a different experience.”Students are able to travel to places such as the United Kingdom, Italy, Croatia, Greece, Spain, Morocco, Senegal, Brazil, Panama, Costa Rica, Japan, Hawaii, Vietnam, Burma, India, Malaysia and Myanmar, Marshall said.Marshall said one of the highlights from her trip was riding on camels in the Sahara Desert and sleeping in hammocks on the Amazon River. “Semester at Sea offers you the option to explore so many different places,” Marshall said. “I would have never chosen to go to Senegal, but that was probably one of my favorite places to go to. Every country was so amazing.” Theisen said one of the biggest advantages of studying abroad on the ship was the personal growth it offered.“It was a huge learning experience,” Theisen said. “In some places, you were surrounded by poverty, and a lot of people chose not to get off the ship. “There were times when people would swarm you begging for money, and I had never experienced anything like that. Those situations can be uncomfortable, but that’s when you grow.”Marshall said she would recommend Semester at Sea to anyone. “It pushes you to go outside of your comfort zone by spending time on a boat with a bunch of strangers and traveling to different parts of the world I could have never imagined going to,” Marshall said. “It has definitely helped to shape me into the better person I am today.”Tags: center for women’s intercultural leadership, semester at sea, study abroadlast_img read more

FA panel to discuss Scudamore case

first_img The FA’s inclusion advisory board (IAB), chaired by independent FA board member Heather Rabbatts, will look into Scudamore’s emails and the Premier League’s process in handling the case. Scudamore spoke of his “sincere contrition” after the clubs decided against any further disciplinary action and said he would hold a series of meetings across football’s administration to reassure them of his commitment to promote women in the game. Ouseley said: “The Prime Minister stated earlier today that he wouldn’t tolerate these types of comments in his own cabinet. A decision like this and the way it was made reflects the dominance, strength and culture at the very top of the football pyramid. Ouseley also claimed the Premier League’s process in dealing with Scudamore was “flawed”. Ouseley said: “Richard Scudamore is one of the most successful and powerful men in world football. The outcome of the proceedings into the revealed emails and their contents leaves the status quo intact. “The process adopted by the Premier League is a flawed one and there was only ever going to be one outcome. It is incumbent on the Premier League to put in place a proper, objective, fair and independent process for dealing with such important matters in future.” The row has gone to the very top of British politics, however, with Prime Minister David Cameron saying the sexist emails highlighted the need for people to treat others with respect. Cameron said he had not personally read the messages sent by Scudamore, but that high standards had to be maintained. Asked if a minister would survive in their job if they admitted sexist behaviour, he told BBC Radio 5 Live: “I don’t think they would. “I have to be careful what I say because I haven’t seen these specific emails, but…we have to set and keep high standards in politics. “I have tried to enforce that in my own party.” He added: “I haven’t actually seen the emails myself but obviously people should treat everybody else with respect.” West Ham vice-chairman Karren Brady insisted Scudamore “is categorically not sexist”, but said she was disappointed to learn of the emails. The head of anti-discrimination group Kick It Out, Lord Herman Ouseley, said Cameron’s statements showed the need for change in football. A Football Association equality panel will meet on Tuesday to discuss the Richard Scudamore sexist emails case after the Premier League chief executive received full backing from clubs. Press Associationlast_img read more

Pochettino quiet on Schneiderlin

first_img French midfielder Schneiderlin is determined to join his former Saints manager at White Hart Lane, yet new St Mary’s boss Ronald Koeman insists the 24-year-old is not for sale. It remains to be seen whether the £15million-rated Frenchman will eventually be able to leave ahead of the closing of the transfer window. “Our style is always to (get a) feel (for) the player and after to try to get the best out of them for the team and for the club.” Pochettino, conducting his media duties in English, unlike when at Southampton, added: “At the moment our challenge is putting into practice our philosophy, our system. “We know we need time to improve our new system, our new philosophy, but we are very happy at the moment. “We improve quickly and the most important thing is we are ready to play and compete.” Pochettino will assess those players who returned late from international duty at the World Cup – three Belgians and Brazil’s Paulinho – before naming his squad to take to Upton Park. “We need to analyse some players because they arrived late from the World Cup and we need to improve their physical condition,” he said. “At the moment I have my ideas in my mind but I need one more day to decide the 18 players for playing against West Ham on Saturday.” England winger Andros Townsend should be in contention having missed the end of last season and the World Cup with an ankle problem. “We need to recover a player like him because he has great potential and very good qualities,” Pochettino said. Spurs have also announced that striker Harry Kane has signed a new five-year deal at White Hart Lane. The 21-year-old has long been considered as a hot prospect at the north London club and enjoyed a run in the side under former head coach Tim Sherwood last season. Kane, who has also spent time on loan at Leyton Orient, Millwall, Norwich and Leicester, scored in three consecutive Barclays Premier League games in April and will provide competition to Roberto Soldado and Emmanuel Adebayor as Pochettino looks to hit the ground running with victory over West Ham on Saturday. Pochettino has already brought in the likes of goalkeeper Michael Vorm and defenders Ben Davies and Eric Dier – signings the Argentinian feels can help the north London club in their quest to break back into the Barclays Premier League’s top four. “It (new signings) is not my concern. I think we have an unbelievable squad,” said the Tottenham manager. “Last season the club made a big investment and they signed unbelievable players. The most important thing is to develop our players and to provide the best team to play on the pitch.” When pressed on Schneiderlin, the former Saints boss said: “No, it is not my style to speak about a player from another club, I don’t like that. “I have full respect for all of them and I have nothing to say.” Tottenham open the new campaign at West Ham, and then play a Europa League qualifier against AEL Limassol before heading across London again to tackle promoted QPR. Pochettino sees no reason why Spurs cannot move forward in 2014-2015. “We want to improve every time, but we need to learn,” he said. Tottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino believes he has an “unbelievable squad”, but refused to be drawn on any attempt to recruit Morgan Schneiderlin from Southampton. Press Associationlast_img read more

Friday is deadline for requesting absentee ballot for Primary

first_imgDES MOINES — Almost 400,000 Iowans have asked for an absentee ballot for the June 2nd Primary and early voting is likely to set an all-time record for a primary.“People have listened and they heard. They got the message: let’s vote safe, let’s vote from home right now,” says Secretary of State Paul Pate, the state’s commissioner of elections.His office mailed absentee ballot request forms to every registered Iowa voter, encouraging Iowans to ask their county auditor for the vote-by-mail option rather than in-person voting on Primary Day.“I think the pandemic has put a much stronger emphasis on voting,” Pate says. “People are at home. They’re paying attention to what the government’s doing.”The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot is Friday at 5 p.m. and officials suggest any request sent through the U.S. Postal Service be mailed today to ensure it gets to the county auditor on time. Polk County Auditor Jamie Fitzgerald says in Iowa’s largest county, an average of about 9000 people typically ask for an absentee ballot for a Primary. His office has already processed 10,000 “and we still have 54,000 requests,” Fitzgerald says.While there will be in-person voting available on Primary day, election officials like Fitzgerald are encouraging Iowans to use this vote-at-home option.“We are in the pandemic,” Fitzgerald says. “You have people now that are voting safely, making sure they don’t spread the virus.”Pate says Iowa National Guard soldiers distributed personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies to county auditors last week that will be used by poll workers at precinct voting sites on June 2nd. Each voting booth will be cleaned between uses. Some counties plan to offer voters gloves. In Polk County, each Primary Day voter will be given their own pen to use and take with them after they cast their ballot.“We want Iowans to be able to vote,” Pate says. “We want them to be able to vote safely and we want our poll workers to be safe.”Fitzgerald says in Polk County — and most others — the number of precincts have been reduced, to ensure there’s enough space inside for social distancing and to make sure there are enough poll workers.“I don’t want to wake up like they did in Wisconsin and find out that 400 people have quit, so we’re constantly training,” Fitzgerald says. “We’re constantly talking to our poll workers.”Pate predicts as many as 70 percent of ballots cast in the June Primary, however, will be absentee ballots. He says Iowans can track their absentee ballots on www.voterready.iowa.gov.“When the auditor’s office receives your request i’ll show that. It’ll show when the auditor sends (the absentee ballot) out. It’ll show when it got back to the auditor’s office, Pate says, “so you know it got there.”The two election officials made their comments this weekend on the “Iowa Press” program on Iowa PBS. They both are urging Iowans voting by mail to avoid a common mistake — and remember to sign and date the ballot.last_img read more

Somalia eject Uganda cubs in CECAFA U-17 event

first_imgKampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | Defending champions Uganda Cubs are out of the on-going CECAFA U-17 Championship in Burundi.The Cubs suffered a shock 1-0 defeat to Somalia at the Gitega Stadium in one of the semi final matches played on Wednesday.Uganda Cubs who won the trophy when the Championship was last held in 2009 failed to match the Somalia team that reportedly played a highly passing game.Ahmed Farhaman scored the lone goal for Somalia early in the first half, while Uganda Cubs had Sula Mpuga miss a penalty in the second half. Before the semi final Uganda Cubs drew 1-1 with Tanzania in the opening group B game before defeating Sudan 3-0. “It is disappointing that we created several scoring chances, but failed to win the game,” Uganda’s coach Peter Onen said after the game.Tanzania joined Somalia in the final after they humbled Kenya 2-1 in the second semi final game also played the same day. Somalia started the tournament with a 3-0 loss to Zanzibar, but were awarded the points and three goals after Zanzibar was thrown out of the tournament when they were discovered to have 12 over age players in the tournament.The Somalia team handled by Salad Farah Hassan went on to defeat Kenya 1-0 in another group game and also drew goalless against the hosts Burundi.The tournament that attracted Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania, Somalia and hosts Burundi is fully sponsored by the Federation of International Football Association (FIFA).***URNShare on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Boxer Rubin ‘Hurricane’ Carter dies at 76

first_imgIn this Jan. 29, 2004 file photo, former boxer, Rubin, “Hurricane” Carter, holds up the writ of habeas corpus that freed him from prison, during a news conference held in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, the boxer whose wrongful murder conviction became an international symbol of racial injustice, died Sunday. He was 76.He had been stricken with prostate cancer in Toronto, the New Jersey native’s adopted home. John Artis, a longtime friend and caregiver, told The Canadian Press that Carter died in his sleep.Carter spent 19 years in prison for three murders at a tavern in Paterson, N.J., in 1966. He was convicted alongside Artis in 1967 and again in a new trial in 1976.Carter was freed in November 1985 when his convictions were set aside after years of appeals and public advocacy. His ordeal and the alleged racial motivations behind it were publicized in Bob Dylan’s 1975 song “Hurricane,” several books and a 1999 film starring Denzel Washington, who received an Academy Award nomination for playing the boxer turned prisoner.Carter’s murder convictions abruptly ended the boxing career of a former petty criminal who became an undersized middleweight contender largely on ferocity and punching power.Although never a world champion, Carter went 27-12-1 with 19 knockouts, memorably stopping two-division champ Emile Griffith in the first round in 1963. He also fought for a middleweight title in 1964, losing a unanimous decision to Joey Giardello.In June 1966, three white people were shot by two black men at the Lafayette Bar and Grill in Paterson. Carter and Artis were convicted by an all-white jury largely on the testimony of two thieves who later recanted their stories.Carter was granted a new trial and briefly freed in 1976, but sent back for nine more years after being convicted in a second trial.Thom Kidrin, who became friends with Carter after visiting him several times in prison, told The Associated Press the boxer “didn’t have any bitterness or anger — he kind of got above it all. That was his great strength.”“I wouldn’t give up,” Carter said in an interview on PBS in 2011. “No matter that they sentenced me to three life terms in prison. I wouldn’t give up. Just because a jury of 12 misinformed people … found me guilty did not make me guilty. And because I was not guilty, I refused to act like a guilty person.”Dylan became aware of Carter’s plight after reading the boxer’s autobiography. He met Carter and co-wrote “Hurricane,” which he performed on his Rolling Thunder Revue tour in 1975. The song concludes: “That’s the story of the Hurricane/But it won’t be over till they clear his name/And give him back the time he’s done/Put him in a prison cell but one time he could-a been/The champion of the world.”Muhammad Ali spoke out on Carter’s behalf. Advertising art director George Lois and other celebrities also worked toward Carter’s release.With a network of friends and volunteers also advocating for him, Carter eventually won his release from U.S. District Judge H. Lee Sarokin, who wrote that Carter’s prosecution had been “predicated upon an appeal to racism rather than reason, and concealment rather than disclosure.”Born on May 6, 1937, into a family of seven children, Carter struggled with a hereditary speech impediment and was sent to a juvenile reform center at 12 after an assault. He escaped and joined the Army in 1954, experiencing racial segregation and learning to box while in West Germany.Carter then committed a series of muggings after returning home, spending four years in various state prisons. He began his pro boxing career in 1961 after his release, winning 20 of his first 24 fights mostly by stoppage.Carter was fairly short for a middleweight at 5-foot-8, but he was aggressive and threw a lot of punches. His shaved head and menacing glower gave him an imposing ring presence, but also contributed to a menacing aura outside the ring. He was quoted as joking about killing police officers in a 1964 story in the Saturday Evening Post, which was later cited by Carter as a cause of his troubles with police.Carter boxed regularly on television at Madison Square Garden and overseas in London, Paris and Johannesburg. Although his career appeared to be on a downswing before he was implicated in the murders, Carter was hoping for a second middleweight title shot.Carter and Artis were questioned after being spotted in the area of the murders in Carter’s white car, which vaguely matched witnesses’ descriptions.Both cited alibis and were released, but were arrested months later. A case relying largely on the testimony of thieves Alfred Bello and Arthur Bradley resulted in a conviction in June 1967.Carter defied his prison guards from the first day of his incarceration, spending time in solitary confinement because of it.“When I walked into prison, I refused to wear their stripes,” Carter said. “I refused to eat their food. I refused to work their jobs, and I would have refused to breathe the prison’s air if I could have done so.”Carter eventually wrote and spoke eloquently about his plight, publishing his autobiography, “The Sixteenth Round,” in 1974. Benefit concerts were held for his legal defense.After his release, Carter moved to Toronto, where he served as the executive director of the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted from 1993 to 2005. He received two honorary doctorates for his work.Carter’s papers will be sent to the Rubin Carter/John Artiz Innocence International Project at Tufts University outside Boston, Kidrin said.Director Norman Jewison made Carter’s story into a well-reviewed biographical film, with Washington working closely alongside Carter to capture the boxer’s transformation and redemption. Washington won a Golden Globe for the role.“He’s all love,” Washington said while onstage with Carter at the Golden Globes ceremony in 2000. “He lost about 7,300 days of his life, and he’s love. He’s all love.”On Sunday, when told of Carter’s death, Washington said in a statement: “God bless Rubin Carter and his tireless fight to ensure justice for all.”The makers of “The Hurricane,” however, were widely criticized for factual inaccuracies and glossing over other parts of Carter’s story, including his criminal past and a reputation for a violent temper. Giardello sued the film’s producers for its depiction of a racist fix in his victory over Carter, who acknowledged Giardello deserved the win.Carter’s weight and activity dwindled during his final months, but he still advocated for prisoners he believed to be wrongfully convicted.Carter wrote an opinion essay for the New York Daily News in February, arguing vehemently for the release of David McCallum, convicted of a kidnapping and murder in 1985.Kidrin said Carter would be cremated, with some of the ashes given to his family. Two sisters are among Carter’s survivors, though Kidrin said Carter was alienated from many relatives.Kidrin planned to sprinkle Carter’s remains in the ocean off Cape Cod, where they spent the last three summers together. Artis planned to bring some of the ashes to a horse farm in Kentucky the boxer loved.Kidrin spoke with Carter on Wednesday.“He said, ‘You know, look, death’s coming. I’m ready for it. But it’s really going to have to take me because I’m positive to the end.’”___AP Sports Writer Rick Freeman and AP Drama Writer Mark Kennedy contributed to this report in New York.last_img read more

Eat, Sleep, Learn!

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Andrew Taber, Kumon Math & Reading Center of LaceyThere are three key essentials for a successful school year: healthy eating habits, the right amount of rest, and a positive and productive work environment. Each component can help lead your family into the school year on the right foot. We’ve put together a guide to help families foster a home in which all members are thriving. With ideas for quick and easy bedtime routines, personalized study rooms, and even a simple list of “brain foods,” this article will help create a hassle-free start to the school year.You Are What You EatChildren who are taught good time management and healthy eating habits early in life are likely to continue and maintain them throughout adulthood. Create a morning routine for your child that includes a healthy breakfast, a proven way to improve focus and study skills in school. Prepare a healthy, well-balanced lunch filled with nutritious snacks to keep your child energized throughout the day. When your child gets home from school, offer up some serious “brain foods” such as nuts, low-fat cheese with whole grain crackers, or even some celery with peanut butter. Providing the freedom to choose his or her snack is quite empowering for a child!  Set a timeframe for snacks after school so your child will appreciate structure and routine, while also improving time management skills.A Good Night’s SleepEarlier wake-up times can be tough on kids and parents alike. Ease your family’s transition to a “school night” sleep schedule by rolling back bedtimes the week before classes start. Children aged three to twelve need at least ten to twelve hours of sleep per night, while older children need at least nine or more.  We all know that some children have a more difficult time being told when to go to sleep.  Here are a few pointers that may help avoid the “the battle of bedtime.”Creating a Productive Learning EnvironmentA supportive home environment will foster a child’s love for learning. Enable your child to excel by making study and productivity part of everyday life. Your child needs a special place to call their own, so consider setting up a space where your child can settle in and leave papers and pens at hand without having to pack up each night. Encourage your child to spread out and take advantage of his or her work space.  Let them maintain and take ownership of that area and they will begin to develop organizational skills they’ll need down the road.Keep these tips in mind as you organize and prepare your home for the new school year. Keep your child’s developing life skills in mind during the process, you’ll create an atmosphere that nurtures success in the classroom and beyond.To learn more, visit Kumon by clicking here.last_img read more