Northrop Grumman gets $115M deal for DoN LAIRCM systems

first_imgNorthrop Grumman’s LAIRCM system is said to provide maximum aircraft and aircrew survivability. The DoN LAIRCM system defends aircraft against surface-to-air infrared missile threats. The system automatically counters advanced infrared missile systems by detecting, tracking and jamming the threat with a high-intensity laser beam. Northrop Grumman gets $115M deal for DoN LAIRCM systems As informed, the company will integrate the latest version of the DoN LAIRCM system onto U.S. aircraft. The DoN LAIRCM is currently in service on both rotary and fixed wing aircraft. Additionally, Northrop Grumman will install DoN LAIRCM systems on aircraft owned by allied governments. Naida Hakirevic April 12, 2021, by Share this article View post tag: US Navy Photo: US DOD Equipment & technologycenter_img The U.S. Navy recently awarded Northrop Grumman Corporation a $115 million production contract for U.S. Department of the Navy’s Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (DoN LAIRCM) systems. View post tag: Northrop Grumman Under this latest task order, Northrop Grumman will continue to provide support and maintenance for the battle-proven DoN LAIRCM systems that are currently installed on U.S. military aircraft. Northrop Grumman was also awarded additional contracts recently including integration, sustainment and support of the DoN LAIRCM systems. View post tag: DoN LAIRCM Back to overview,Home naval-today Northrop Grumman gets $115M deal for DoN LAIRCM systems Northrop Grumman’s Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) systems are installed on more than 1,500 aircraft of more than 80 different platform types worldwide and are the frontline defense system for U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps platforms.last_img read more

Not livestock. Food

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaFarmers never get to set the price for their livestock. They can have more say in the matter, though, whenever they can stop thinking “livestock” and start thinking “food” for restaurants, grocery stores and other direct markets.To help them do that, two free “Direct Marketing of Livestock Products Workshops” are set for Feb. 28 in Tifton, Ga., and March 14 in Statesboro, Ga.Specialists from three university groups will lead the workshops: the University of Georgia Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, the UGA Food Science and Technology Department and the Fort Valley State University Animal Science Department. The event is sponsored by the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program at UGA.Direct marketing can make farms more successful in ways that are environmentally friendly and good for rural communities. Consumer demand for direct-marketed livestock products is growing.The workshops are each a full day packed with information on how to be successful at direct marketing of beef, goat, hog, sheep and poultry products. Each program starts at 8 a.m. and ends around 5:15 p.m. Lunch and a resource binder are provided.And it’s free.The only catch is that each location has room only for the first 30 people to register there. The workshop is open to farmer mentors, county agents, agricultural professionals and community leaders.The Tifton workshop will be at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center, and the Statesboro program will be at the Bulloch Center for Agriculture. To learn more about either workshop or to register, contact Joy Schomberg at (706) 542-8084 or [email protected] The workshop agenda is online at www.agp2.org/sust_ag/.last_img read more

Citigroup warns that the boom in U.S. LNG exports could be headed for a 2020 bust

first_imgCitigroup warns that the boom in U.S. LNG exports could be headed for a 2020 bust FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:A global glut of natural gas has gotten so massive that U.S. exporters could soon face their worst-case scenario: Halting shipments to get supply and demand back in balance.Prices for the heating and power-plant fuel may collapse in Europe and Asia next year to levels that would force U.S. liquefied natural gas suppliers to curb output, Citigroup Inc. said in a note to clients last week. Morgan Stanley sees as much as 2.7 billion cubic feet a day of American exports curtailed around the second or third quarter, assuming normal weather. That’s about half the volume now being sent abroad.China’s demand for U.S. LNG has plunged amid the trade war, while Europe’s gas storage is almost full and tankers carrying the fuel are taking unusually long journeys in search of better prices. That’s created a “toxic witch’s brew” that’s making it harder to find a home for American exports, according to Madeline Jowdy, senior director of global gas and LNG for S&P Global Platts in New York.“It’s also a harbinger of bigger troubles ahead for U.S. exporters in the second quarter of next year, when global demand is at its weakest point and the U.S. will have even more volumes to place” as new export terminals start up, Jowdy said in an email.Capping LNG production is an extreme measure, but the idea is gaining traction as new terminals from the U.S. to Australia unleash exports faster than demand can catch up. Gas for near-term delivery in Asia has lost half its value in the past 14 months, with the Dutch benchmark nearly matching that decline. A mild winter would make the glut even worse — bad news for U.S. suppliers like Cheniere Energy Inc. and Sempra Energy.In the past three years, soaring gas output from shale basins has vaulted the U.S. into the ranks of the world’s largest LNG producers. The nation is widely seen as a so-called swing supplier because its exports can respond quickly to a volatile market.More: Gas ‘witch’s brew’ has U.S. exporters facing worst-case scenariolast_img read more