The Asher Fulero Band Goes “Airborne” On New Live Album

first_imgSought after side man Asher Fulero is stepping out of the shadows and making his mark with a new band and a decidedly jammy sound. Having worked with dozens of artists in the studio and onstage Fulero has honed his keyboard skills to razor sharpness and it shows on his new live release, Airborne. Playing tunes from his band’s 2015 studio release, Catching Air, Fulero shows a dynamic sound and a deep commitment to musical exploration.Fans of his most visible current gig as part of the Emancipator live band will be pleased to hear elements of that sound present throughout the disc. To help celebrate the release, the band is releasing a series of videos from the show, all edited together by Fulero himself. “I taught myself Final Cut Pro and set out to edit all the footage together myself. I really enjoyed getting to learn another way to bring my music to the people,” said Fulero in a recent chat.Airborne (Live) was recorded at the venerable Goodfoot Pub & Lounge in Portland, Oregon, the band’s home base where their previous studio album was recorded. The show is a wild and exploratory take on the material, with each song well over ten minutes in length. ‘That’s what I love about the jam scene in articular, and why I wanted to form a jam project. Stretching things out, taking the time to find the magic in each piece, is extremely rewarding to me.”With the fourth video segment from the show launching this week and the album finally being made available to the public Asher is excited for fans to hear how the music translates to the stage.  Luckily, you can listen and watch for yourselves!Here’s a link to the songs from Airborne, filmed live at the Goodfoot. Enjoy!Check out the Asher Fulero Band’s Bandcamp page for new tracks and tunes including this latest release!last_img read more

Coping with cold

first_imgBy Mike IsbellUniversity of GeorgiaWow. It’s been really cold this winter.I’m surprised the creeping gardenias at my house have made it through the cold. Truly frigid weather (12 degrees at my house) is supposed to severely injure them. I knew that when I planted them, but it’s been so long since we’ve had a real winter I just didn’t think we’d see temperatures like that.Years ago — OK, many years ago, back when we had “real” winters and I was a kid at home in north Georgia, and back when it seemed to snow every year, and we saved water in big pots because the water pipes froze all the time, and I slept in an unheated room and no electric blanket — now, that was cold.At night, even with so many blankets and quilts I could hardly turn over in the bed, the only way to stay warm was to sleep rolled up in a ball. I didn’t dare stretch out, because those sheets at the foot of the bed were ice cold.We didn’t worryBack then, we didn’t worry about outdoor plants freezing. We worried about the water freezing and pipes bursting. And we didn’t worry too much about Spot and Butch, our old “sooner” dogs freezing. You do know what a “sooner” is, don’t you? You know –“sooner one breed or another.”Now we worry about our plants freezing.So if you’re worried that cold weather may cause the demise of your plants, here’s what you can do.Bring in your containerized plants. But remember, even an unheated garage can get below freezing. And I can tell you from experience that an unheated bedroom can, too.Add an extra layer of pine straw or mulch over perennials and annuals. Tender shrubs can be covered with cardboard boxes or thick blankets. Cover them all the way to the ground and leave the covering open to the ground so the heat radiating from the soil can rise up under the covering.No plasticDon’t cover the plants with plastic. That will encourage moisture lost from the foliage to condense on the leaves and flowers, causing ice crystals that may damage plant parts and cause more damage.And don’t try to spray the plants with water to form a layer of ice on the foliage. You just can’t apply the volume of water needed to make this type of freeze protection effective.Pansies can be frozen solid and still come back.How can they do that? I called horticulturist Paul Thomas at the university to find out.”When it gets cold,” Paul explained, “most plants die because the ice freezes within the cells and ruptures the cell membranes. This damage either kills the plant outright or allows in disease that quickly finishes off the plant.”Making antifreezePansies and many other perennials, he said, can sense the cold and move water from the cells into the between-cell spaces. They relocate water into the roots, too, where it is less likely to freeze underground.”When the water is removed, the cell contents inside are concentrated,” he said, “and all the sugars from photosynthesis form a simple antifreeze. The pansy may turn a dull, gray green, but it’s perfectly happy.”When things warm up, he said, the plants move water back into the cells and come back strong.I don’t know if “sooner” dogs can be frozen solid, but they always come back.last_img read more