Saints return holds no fear for Redknapp

first_img “They are not bad people there. I wouldn’t say Southampton supporters are nasty, aggressive people. They’re not. They’re good supporters and they’ll give me a bit of grief but that’s life. I accept that. I will just get on with. I won’t lose any sleep over that. I will only lose sleep if the result is bad.” Anything but victory for QPR could prove disastrous for a side already seven points adrift of safety at the bottom of the Premier League. That is where Southampton ended the 2004-05 season under Redknapp but he insists he has a clear conscience. “Listen, no one was more upset than I was that the club got relegated that year,” he added. “When I went there were four teams cut adrift by miles and we just couldn’t get out of it. “I gave everything I had and that’s all you can do. You can look yourself in the mirror. No one tried harder than I did. You can only give your best at the end of the day. You are relying on players. I have said when I have been successful and done well at Tottenham, it is about good players. That is what the game is about. “If you’ve got good players, it is an easy game. You send them on the pitch and off they go. They perform week in, week out. It’s easy and the better players you’ve got the easier the job is.” QPR manager Harry Redknapp will not be losing any sleep over the hostile reception awaiting him at Southampton on Saturday, insisting he has no regrets ahead of his first return to St Mary’s. Saints suffered relegation from the Barclays Premier League eight years ago under the supervision of Redknapp, who then quit to re-join bitter rivals Portsmouth a matter of months later. That period still rankles with many Southampton fans, who will no doubt make their feelings known when he brings bottom side QPR to the south coast tomorrow. “Listen, I will get a bit of grief, won’t I? But what can you do? That’s no problem,” he said. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

USC creates new task force to address sexual violence

first_imgThe Office of Equity and Diversity announced the launch of the Sexual Misconduct Prevention Task Force, a group consisting of five committees to address the issue of campus sexual assault and gender violence on Wednesday.New home · The Center for Women and Men plans to relocate to the Engemann Student Health Center (above) in October 2014. – Razan al Marzouqi | Daily TrojanThe launch, announced by email, follows a March letter to the USC community from Ainsley Carry, vice provost for student affairs.“Student safety is our highest priority, and USC wants all members of our community to have an environment free from sexual assault and misconduct,” Carry said in his March 25 letter. “We desire to enhance communication to achieve this priority.”Though it is headed by Jody Shipper, Title IX Coordinator and executive director of the Office of Equity and Diversity and Ekta Kumar, director of the Center for Women and Men, the task force will be mainly student-run. Title IX is a federal provision barring gender discrimination in an education environment.The five committees of the task force are student programming; clinical and advocacy procedures; communications; sexual assault policy; and inclusivity, LGBTQ and gender-based misconduct.Ilene Rosenstein, director of student counseling services, will lead the clinical and advocacy procedures committee; Lynette Merriman, associate provost for support and advocacy, will lead the communications committee; Kelby Harrison, director of the LGBTQ Center, will lead the inclusivity, LGBTQ and gender-based misconduct committee; and Shipper will lead the sexual assault policy committee.Kumar will coordinate the student programming committee in addition to managing the task force as a whole. She said that she has already received over 20 emails expressing interest in the committee, and that other coordinators she has spoken to have received similar levels of student interest.“We’re getting a lot of student interest in it, which is good,” Kumar said.“I think the whole point of the task force is to get students involved in this kind of work, and for their voices to be heard,” Kumar said. “And so that is why we separated it in five areas, to have a comprehensive approach.”Though planning is its early stages, the five committees will collaborate with each other in managing and implementing student-led initiatives.“Everyone who’s leading a committee, all of us will be touching base with one another, so there will be communication with different people who are running the subcommittees,” Kumar said.Last week, USC hosted a national conference of university leaders to discuss issues related to sexual misconduct. Thirty-five universities sent representatives to the conference to discuss issues of prevention, bystander awareness education, education programs and legislation regarding college sexual assaults.Such legislation includes the yes means yes law. California became the first state in the nation this week to institute an affirmative definition of consent. SB 967, popularly known as the yes means yes law, requires that people who engage in sexual activity give affirmative, unambiguous and voluntary consent to sexual acts. All California universities who use financial aid funding from the state must conform to the law.Kumar said input from the conference encouraged the development of the task force.“It reinforced the fact that we’re doing this and helped us recognize that we’re ahead of the wave,” she said.last_img read more

Friday is deadline for requesting absentee ballot for Primary

first_imgDES MOINES — Almost 400,000 Iowans have asked for an absentee ballot for the June 2nd Primary and early voting is likely to set an all-time record for a primary.“People have listened and they heard. They got the message: let’s vote safe, let’s vote from home right now,” says Secretary of State Paul Pate, the state’s commissioner of elections.His office mailed absentee ballot request forms to every registered Iowa voter, encouraging Iowans to ask their county auditor for the vote-by-mail option rather than in-person voting on Primary Day.“I think the pandemic has put a much stronger emphasis on voting,” Pate says. “People are at home. They’re paying attention to what the government’s doing.”The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot is Friday at 5 p.m. and officials suggest any request sent through the U.S. Postal Service be mailed today to ensure it gets to the county auditor on time. Polk County Auditor Jamie Fitzgerald says in Iowa’s largest county, an average of about 9000 people typically ask for an absentee ballot for a Primary. His office has already processed 10,000 “and we still have 54,000 requests,” Fitzgerald says.While there will be in-person voting available on Primary day, election officials like Fitzgerald are encouraging Iowans to use this vote-at-home option.“We are in the pandemic,” Fitzgerald says. “You have people now that are voting safely, making sure they don’t spread the virus.”Pate says Iowa National Guard soldiers distributed personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies to county auditors last week that will be used by poll workers at precinct voting sites on June 2nd. Each voting booth will be cleaned between uses. Some counties plan to offer voters gloves. In Polk County, each Primary Day voter will be given their own pen to use and take with them after they cast their ballot.“We want Iowans to be able to vote,” Pate says. “We want them to be able to vote safely and we want our poll workers to be safe.”Fitzgerald says in Polk County — and most others — the number of precincts have been reduced, to ensure there’s enough space inside for social distancing and to make sure there are enough poll workers.“I don’t want to wake up like they did in Wisconsin and find out that 400 people have quit, so we’re constantly training,” Fitzgerald says. “We’re constantly talking to our poll workers.”Pate predicts as many as 70 percent of ballots cast in the June Primary, however, will be absentee ballots. He says Iowans can track their absentee ballots on www.voterready.iowa.gov.“When the auditor’s office receives your request i’ll show that. It’ll show when the auditor sends (the absentee ballot) out. It’ll show when it got back to the auditor’s office, Pate says, “so you know it got there.”The two election officials made their comments this weekend on the “Iowa Press” program on Iowa PBS. They both are urging Iowans voting by mail to avoid a common mistake — and remember to sign and date the ballot.last_img read more