SMC hosts foreign language celebration

first_imgSaint Mary’s students shared in the native languages of six women from five different countries Monday through “Writing Across the World,” an event sponsored by the Saint Mary’s English Language School. At the event, which also marked the beginning of International Week, the women translated and transcribed students’ names into their native languages. She designed the event to promote dialogue – in English or otherwise –  between students, Terra Cowham, assistant director for International Student Scholar Services at the English Language School, said.  “During International Week, we want to highlight all the diversity in the international students on our campus,” Cowham said. “We thought it’d be really awesome if they wrote some themes or sayings while sharing their native language with us.”  “This event begins a cultural festival,” Ethiopian student Neima Mohammed said. Mohammed’s ability to speak English fluently is a result of five months of language classes from Saint Mary’s, she said. The Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership offers a rigorous program in the English Language School to non-native speakers, and Cowham said the four-week program is open to anyone. “We have a program for anyone, [from] adult women [to] students just out of high school, if they want to come and learn English they come here, live on campus and they take classes that are non-degree but focused on learning the English language,” she said. Cowham said many women come for additional practice or instruction before they enter another college. “I am extremely passionate about making students global citizens and connecting the world every day,” Cowham said. “I want to help all of campus see what wonderful resources we have, all the wonderful students that come here from across the world.” Noemy Siles-Alvarado, a Costa Rican student, said she feels the strong sense of community that Cowham has tried to foster for international students at Saint Mary’s. “The professors are really, really good. All the girls are friendly,” she said. “I have enjoyed it, it feels like family.” Siles-Alvarado said she found her role at the writing event amusing. “It’s interesting for me because I’m from Costa Rica. It’s not that amazing and for most people it’s the same name in English as it is in Spanish,” she said. “For the other girls, I think it’s really cool because they can write in their own language.” Siles-Alvarado said she chose to attend the English Language School to improve her grammar before she begins pursuing a pre-medicine degree at Goshen College. Maha Alshahrani, a student from Saudi Arabia, said she chose Saint Mary’s to study among pupils of her own gender and aspires to receive a Master’s degree from Notre Dame. Mayumi Oda and Misa Inaba are both studying abroad from the same college in Japan, which Inaba said was “kind of a sister school to Saint Mary’s.” This semester they live with two American roommates in Le Mans Hall. Oda said as much as they miss home now, when they leave they will miss Saint Mary’s as well. “It’s beautiful to communicate with another country’s people,” Oda said. Contact Rebecca O’Neil at [email protected]last_img read more

Executive Encourages People To Buy Dairy Products As Farms Dump Excess Milk

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Cropped Photo: Rebecca Siegel / CC BY 2.0MAYVILLE – Farms remain open as an essential business during the global COVID-19 pandemic, but the farming industry is still struggling, according to Chautauqua County Executive P.J. Wendel. Wendel discussed the struggles that the 1,200-plus farms in Chautauqua County have faced during his daily COVID-19 Facebook update. He says there’s too much milk on the market due to the closure of schools and decline in restaurant sales, causing farms nationwide to dump their excess milk.The County Executive says there’s more than 150 dairy farms in the County, and he asks that people buy extra dairy products to help support them.“Please consider buying an extra judge of milk, a block of American-made cheese, or a tub of ice cream,” Wendel said. “According to the Institute for Food Safety at Cornell University, our food system is secure and there are no legitimate threats of food shortages.” Wendel asks anyone who sees stores limiting dairy products or purchases to call Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Business Management Specialist at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Chautauqua County, at 716-640-0522.“We want to remind everybody to stay home, stay healthy and stay safe, and in the end, we will be CHQ strong.”last_img read more

London Spirit retain England captains Eoin Morgan and Heather Knight for The Hundred | Cricket News

first_imgMorgan said: “We have the makings of a great squad and I’m looking forward to playing at the Home of Cricket in this exciting new format. I believe we will have a great blend of skills both in the squad and our coaching staff and I can’t wait to get going.”Knight added: “It is a real honour to be retained as skipper for next year. We are beginning to build an exciting side and hopefully we can make a real impact on the pitch.“While it was obviously disappointing that the competition wasn’t able to take place this year, The Hundred promises to be a real leap forward for our sport and I can’t wait to lead the side in 2021.” Dan Lawrence in action for Essex Eagles London Spirit have retained Heather Knight, Eoin Morgan, Dan Lawrence and Naomi Dattani
London Spirit have retained Heather Knight, Eoin Morgan, Dan Lawrence and Naomi Dattani